Steve Nathans-Kelly

Steve Nathans-Kelly is a freelance writer, editor, and video producer. While editing a succession of technology trade magazines over the last quarter-century in Boston, Madison, Wisconsin, and Ithaca, New York, he has maintained a second career of sorts writing about literary fiction and narrative history for sites such as Paste magazine, First of the Month, and VirtualIreland.com, as well as his own blog, FirstLookBooksBlog.com. This work has afforded him opportunities for wide-ranging interviews with the likes of Richard Russo, John Edgar Wideman, Francine Prose, and Dennis Lehane.

Book Reviews by Steve Nathans-Kelly

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“Port establishes Leo Fender’s unique perspective on the world of electric noise he helped create, as he innovated and borrowed and cobbled his way to the world’s first production-model sol

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“For such an unabashedly polemical first novel, The Patricide of George Benjamin Hill works surprising well, due in large measure to the unremitting intensity of Charlesworth’s wri

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“In brisk, vigorous, precise prose honed over decades of daily newspaper work, Gilliam paints a vivid portrait of the obstacles she faced as a black woman breaking multiple barriers in the

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“Like The Thirteenth Tale, Once Upon a River is very much a story about the spellbinding power of storytelling, and the stories troubled people tell themselves and each other to ma

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“A Map of Days reveals Ransom Riggs at the peak of his powers, leaving loyal fans ravenous for more.”

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In “The Accidental Rebel,” an op-ed published in The New York Times on the 40th anniversary of the Columbia student uprising of 1968, novelist Paul Auster (Columbia ’69) asserted that stud

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“Mosley’s new book, John Woman, though it only intermittently delivers the tautly rendered violence and suspense of his detective fiction, is as provocative and morally instructive

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“Bealport is often uproariously and corrosively funny.”

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“an unsettling resonance that more triumphantly framed survivor stories rarely achieve.”