Race & Ethnicity

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This powerful little book belongs to the Object Lessons series described by one admirer in the flyleaf as “the most consistently interesting non-fiction book series in America” (Megan Volpert,

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“Justice Deferred offers a needed refresher course for faded memories on the Supreme Court’s unequal history with one of the key issues not only of our day, but on

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In February of 1969, Duke University was on the cusp of national prominence, about to eclipse Emory and Vanderbilt as the South’s premier institution of higher learning and preparing what would be

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“Filled with vivid first-person accounts, Traveling Black is a superb history that captures a shameful aspect of the American story.”

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From the start it is clear Floating in a Most Peculiar Way is going to be a journey of discovery like few others. Not many people can say they are from a country that no longer exists.

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Koa Beck’s book, White Feminism: From Suffragettes to Influencers and Who They Leave Behind, comes with a rather double- or even triple-edged endorsement from Gloria Steinem; “Don’t judge

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“A challenging read that illuminates harsh truths of our time.”

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“chronicles the century-long struggle following the Civil War by Black Americans and other people of color for true civil and social rights, particularly the right to engage in interracial—

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“A recognition slowly arises that we are all in this together and the time for an awakening to that fact is now.”

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Life of a Klansman is . . .

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With November’s presidential election fast approaching, much attention is being given to white evangelical voters, the bedrock of Donald Trump’s electoral base—more so now, with the racial debate t

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It is late at night on June 4, 2018, and under cover of darkness a father and son, carrying nothing but a backpack, approach “a short wall painted dark” that demarcates the international border bet

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For James Baldwin, “what kind of human beings we aspired to be” matters more than policy and power.  On this, he was “absolutely right”, according to Eddie Glaude Jr.

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According to Jorge Castañeda, it is “as if the United states seeks to challenge foreign writers to explain it, confident they will fail.” His own attempt is for US citizens, not foreigners, at a “c

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In the post-Charlottesville world where the President of the United States continues to enable these “very fine people” with a deliberate blind eye to the intensity of the

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Empire of Borders provides fundamental, essential information about the current human situation at the borders.”  

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“This is a book about young Muslim men growing up in the United States,” writes Professor John O’Brien, who teaches sociology at New York University Abu Dhabi.

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The rise of Barack Obama to the office of the presidency in 2008 heralded, to the talking heads whose pronouncements much of the populace uses to form its opinions, the final indication that racism

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“The night a stone-fisted neo-barbarian would beat her to gashes and aches everlasting.”

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“Gordon argues that the Klan represents how some of the most primitive political passions are rooted in fear and hatred of otherness—and a willingness to exploit these sentiments for purpos

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Ta-Nehisi Coates writes with a sound mind and a broken heart, with great power and confessed pain, of America’s relationship to African Americans, of African Americans’ struggle to succeed against

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