Social Activists

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“even readers already somewhat familiar with Sulak’s extraordinary life will find many things here to engage and surprise.”

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“The Women’s Suffrage Movement is for men as much as it is women. It’s for everyone, no matter what their sex, gender, ethnicity, or the color of their skin.

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“Zaman’s lines of love to her readers are urgent, unhurried, generous, and, yes, uniquely deserving of the appellation gorgeous.”

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Born in the forties and raised an only child in a middle class family in the fifties’ South, Peggy Caserta grew up in an era in which girls received little education and then worked only until they

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She is a self-taught journalist, a natural detective, a Good Samaritan, and a woman with a mission. Her name is Gladys Kalibbala but the kids she saves call her Mommy or Auntie Gladys.

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"Read this book. Do not wait until some modern Buffalo Bill makes this story into another epic movie about the West's greatest show!"

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“Daring to Drive is a testament to how women in Muslim countries are helping change their culture, one step at a time.”

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The media has a hard time, even in documentaries, of presenting factually accurate history and especially so with movies.

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The subtitle of Brooke Hauser’s new biography of Helen Gurley Brown—The Invention of Helen Gurley Brown and the Rise of the Modern Single Woman—is well chosen.

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“[S]he wrote, ‘I do not desire ecstatic, disembodied sainthood . . . I would be human, and American, and a woman.’”

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In the 19th century there were many individuals who could be considered larger than life, particularly in the United States.

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“Nafis Sadik is a woman who set out to ‘change the world’—and in many ways she did just that.”