History

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The 1936 Summer Olympiad marked pivotal moments in history for world athletes and world politics.

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“We should teach philosophers like Roa. We owe it to Galileo. But it’s unlikely because of science deniers, more prevalent than Livio allows.”

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“Ian Fleming himself could not have written such an improbable yet actual plot . . .”

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On June 1, 1943, Germans “pacified” the Polish village of Sochy. Anna Janko’s mother was orphaned. Sochy had “eighty-eight houses, most with thatched roofs. Two or three made of stone.

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“it would be well for all to read One Mighty and Irresistible Tide in order to gain a better understanding of what it means to be an immigrant pursuing the American Dream.”

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“shows how ordinary Britons and Germans lived their lives in that last year of peace . . .”

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“powerful raw material . . . stunningly beautiful prose. [But] it’s a shame that Thomson’s gifts and these women’s lives were not put to better use.”

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Un-American is most extraordinary because even after the indoctrination of West Point, Edstrom dared to question some of the decisions and the presence of US military as invaders

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Everyone likes a good mystery, particularly when it involves an actual event. In this case, it’s one of the unsolved mysteries of U.S. aviation history.

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As more and more documents and files on intelligence and counter-intelligence operations are declassified as time marches on, the public begins to learn many of the things that go on behind the sce

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Curzio Malaparte is pictured on the cover at his desk with official-looking papers wearing a satin mask and indeed, his many masks are (in)visible in A Foreigner in Paris, newly translated

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Alan D. Gaff is, among other things, a prolific military historian with ten well-received books dealing with various military campaigns and subjects.

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“This book proves that the abstract ‘ideal’ of communism has not died for some people despite the empirical evidence of communism in power.

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Wendy Moore’s skill as a writer delivers the story of these women and the history of the war with exceptional power, laying out a compelling combination of casual

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“Historian Paul Matzko’s well-researched and often terrifically entertaining new book, The Radio Right, provides a compelling, convincing, and closely observed

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Hemingway and Ho Chi Minh did not meet in Paris. They briefly lived a short distance from each other on the Left Bank. This book is about how Paris affected them.

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Political historians Mike Davis and Jon Wiener chronicle the civil rights movements that emerged in Los Angeles during the 1960s in Set the Night on Fire.

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Richard Haass, President of the Council on Foreign Relations, provides the reader with a comprehensive analysis of our world—a valuable guide for every alert citizen as well as for scholars and stu

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Churchill's Shadow Raiders is a genuine techno-thriller . . .”

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"Davis and Douglas arose from very different Americas to create one tragic national history."

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“Foxfire served as a radical revalorization of a denigrated southern mountain culture, often slapped with the pejorative label of ‘hillbilly.’”

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“These women were heroes in every sense of the word and for more reasons than one.”

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“Justice, even decades later, should send a message that these are crimes for which atonement must be paid in full.”      

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The Invention of Yesterday is a solid read for anyone curious about how the connections between human cultures have shaped the narrative of our history as a species.”

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