History

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“Engaging, gorgeous, and thought provoking, this massive tome is a truly landmark example of the synergy between military history and the visual arts.”

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Should one be inclined to search, there is a plethora of titles published on this subject since the end of World War II.

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“My aim in this book,” writes Polish historian Adam Zamoyski in his captivating new biography of Napoleon Bonaparte, “is not to justify or condemn, but to piece together his life . . .

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In the 21st century, Americans take for granted that U.S. presidents exercise broad war-making powers. U.S.

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Carl von Clausewitz is best known for his magnum opus, On War, which has long been considered the standard for Western thought on war and strategy.  Although generations of graduate and wa

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“The book is sure to inspire home cooks to try a hand at baking their own bread and churning fresh butter or spend time drooling over the scrumptious photographs.”

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"through this book of nonfiction snippets, however enlightening, the idea of the author seeing a much bigger picture emerges, one best told through the experience of the different parts."

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Many Americans were shocked last year to watch neo-Nazis marching and chanting racist profanity in the streets of Charlottesville, Virginia.

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On June 21, 1969, an estimated three-quarters of the British population tuned into Royal Family, a fly-on-the-wall BBC documentary that captured the royals as surprisingly ord

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If there are any remaining doubts about the central role played by Ronald Reagan in the unraveling of the Soviet empire, Seth Jones’ riveting new book A Covert Action should dispel them.

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In “The Accidental Rebel,” an op-ed published in The New York Times on the 40th anniversary of the Columbia student uprising of 1968, novelist Paul Auster (Columbia ’69) asserted that stud

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"A Fierce Glory offers spectacle over detail to the benefit of understanding."

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"This very thick book makes a fast entertaining read that illuminates facts about the times on almost every page.

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“The Order of the Day is smug, self-important, and pedestrian history.”

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“Wars are not won by evacuations,” remarked Winston Churchill after 338,226 British and French soldiers were safely transferred from the beaches at Dunkirk to England in late May-early June 1940.

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In the decade before the Civil War two writers penned words that capture the erratic pulse of our American Experiment.

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Anyone seeking to understand the last years of the Cold War should read this book. The central figure is Oleg Gordievsky, now in his eighties and living in a (hopefully) safe house near London.

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“this book is an excellent companion to a survey of photography course, or as an introduction to the evolution of modern visions in photography.”

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"Frontier Rebels makes for a good read, a lost bit of American history in a greater colonial epic in need of telling."

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“a crisply written, compelling narrative that highlights the roles of key U.S. policymakers such as Dean Acheson, George Marshall, Louis Johnson, and George Kennan.”

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"One would think that a biography of an economist would make almost as dull a read as a book on economics.

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“a tale of bravery, courage, and sacrifice . . .”

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John Hendrix tells a very complicated story in tracing Dietrich Bonhoeffer's journey of faith in Nazi Germany. The graphic format serves him well as he intersperses dense text passages with art.

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The “liberal world order” created by the United States after the Second World War is an historical anomaly that may be coming to an end, according to the Brookings Institution’s Robert Kagan in his

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This account of the rise of punk in East Germany is openly the work of a devoted fan of that scene. Tim Mohr is upfront about his emotional investment in the topic.

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