History

Reviewed by: 

“Trying to divine and react to an assertive China’s intentions and capabilities will be the critical national security challenge for the U.S. this century. . . .

Reviewed by: 

[That] The Presidents makes a fast, engrossing read comes as no surprise . . . It works on so many levels including for a general audience.”

Reviewed by: 

“This journal is my life, my companion and my confidant. Without it, I would be lost. In it, I pour out all my heart’s feelings, until I feel somewhat relieved.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Hitler’s Last Plot is certainly among the first to bring together a more detailed look at how the Nazis tried to use these people as a means of mitigating or avoi

Reviewed by: 

“a cautionary tale of ambition, service, and the passing down of the mantel of public service from father to son . . .”

Reviewed by: 

Leadership and the Rise of Great Powers gives morality an explanatory role. In international politics “moral actions help [a rising power] to establish a degree of credibility . . .

Reviewed by: 

What if we took seriously the form of thinking that we find in tragedy, and the experience of partial agency, limited autonomy, deep traumatic affect, agnostic conflict, g

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“A good piece of writing should be brief and concise, but it must also be worthy.”

Reviewed by: 

"In Women's War, Stephanie McCurry writes from a perspective of women as equally important in all social issues of the American Civil War."

Reviewed by: 

The historiography of prisoner of war (POW) publications generally takes the Western or Allied perspective.

Reviewed by: 

“David Powell is quickly becoming a noted historian on the war, with multiple volumes on the Chickamauga and Atlanta Campaigns.”

Reviewed by: 

“While much is known about the two successful accidentals, Roosevelt and Truman, and the partially-successful Lyndon, the latter Johnson, much of the book’s treasure lies in earlier, lesser

Reviewed by: 

“There could not be a better subject for a work of graphic nonfiction (to use the author’s term) than the great Prussian naturalist Alexander von Humboldt.”

Reviewed by: 

“Rubenhold does a commendable job in bringing these women on stage and through their stories illuminating the appalling reality behind the veneer of Victorian complacency.

Reviewed by: 

Perhaps most rewardingly and unexpectedly, Working is a book about what makes great writing: 'Rhythm matters. Mood matters. Sense of place matters.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Case Red has detail that  . . . would make an educational and entertaining read for the World War II enthusiast.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“In When Brooklyn Was Queer, Ryan digs deeper into both the history of Brooklyn, and its queer community . . .

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“If one man can be said to have gotten Americans to the moon, it was definitely John F. Kennedy . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“This is an enchanting and unforgettable little book, beautifully written and translated, which brings Stefania vividly to life.”

Reviewed by: 

“The Unwanted reads like a combination family history and national tragedy on two continents.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

"In Sea People, Pacific historian Christina Thompson tells of the European discovery of the Polynesians and the island people's opening to the wor

Reviewed by: 

“Weis’ book is particularly fascinating in offering a detailed picture of the place of the courtesan in 19th century Parisian social life.”

Reviewed by: 

"More adventure comes packed on certain pages in So Close to Freedom than in other entire books."

Reviewed by: 

The New Silk Roads updates in a concise and reader-friendly manner the author’s previous, much longer but well-received The Silk Roads: A New World History (2015).

Reviewed by: 

Claire Harman’s Murder by the Book begins in chaos and mystery: the body of 73-year-old aristocrat Lord William Russell is discovered in his own bed in his Mayfair mansion, hi

Pages