Popular Culture

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These are the first words you read upon opening this book:

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“I got the Simpsons job the same way I got a wife,” writes Mike Reiss. “I was not the first choice, but I was available.”

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This book is a grand rollercoaster ride through a brief but significant moment of U.S. history, one that America will not likely witness again.

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“This collection would make a great item to place on some deep space probe for other intelligent life to use to learn who and what we are.”

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In Algorithms of Oppression, Safiya Umoja Noble clearly explains how search engines, used by billions daily, are not an innocent, neutral vehicle by which to search for information.

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If Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, first published in 1818, is indeed a novel more talked about than read, as Sir Christopher Frayling suggests in Frankenstein: The First Two Hundred Year

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For some readers, Switched On will be a trip down memory lane; others will be made aware of just how potently and powerfully these women influenced the international worlds of fashion and

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Ann Powers is one of music’s enduring rock critics, emerging on VH1’s “Behind the Music” in the late ’90s with a shock of orange hair, an ironic yet warm affect, everybody’s cozy hipster big sis.

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Do you own a dildo—or its modern cousin, a vibrator—and, if so, when was the last time you used it? If you don’t, why not? 

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“If everybody always lies to you, the consequence is not that you believe the lies, but rather that nobody believes anything any longer.”—Hanna Arendt

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As a general matter, historians tell the stories of great men (and sometimes women) and the events that made them prominent.

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This timely publication addresses much of the misinformation about the trans community that persists despite increasing media coverage both popular and serious.

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It’s become something of a cottage industry for publishers in recent times to take an address that a noted personage gives to a respected college or university and slap it between hard covers to se

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Camille Paglia’s relentlessly controversial public persona and pronouncements tend to overshadow her actual work.

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“one of the best books to come out in many months.”

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“Why are futurists so often wrong, and why do we even listen to them given their poor track record?”

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This is a handy little book for anybody interested in political activism, and perhaps even essential for someone trying alone to navigate the endless corridors of federal bureaucracy.

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If you are in search of or require a “how to” manual or a book that speaks of the usual icons of men’s style, then please move on as those aspects of men and their individual style are not containe

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What makes a tool superior to another . . . has nothing to do with how new it is. What matters is how it enlarges or diminishes us.“

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There is a reason that world renowned chefs like Mario Batali and Anthony Bourdain are singing the praises of Table Manners: How to Behave in the Modern World and Why Bother—because the bo

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Morbid Curiosities is highly recommended for its lurid yet tasteful exploration of an otherwise ignored subculture of collecting.”

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Slim Aarons: Women is one of the most vividly and luxuriously documented books of its genre.

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Modern Life is an expedition through a universe of insightful images that chronicle artist and illustrator Jean Jullien’s perceptions and observations of 21st century life.

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"The hardest working dog in fashion."
—from T magazine

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