Amateur Sleuths

Reviewed by: 

Laura Joh Rowland switches from 17th century Japan to 1890s London in her memorable new series featuring a likeable trio of crime scene photographers for the Daily World newspaper.

Reviewed by: 

“Be warned: Once you pick up the book, you won’t put it down until the end.”

Reviewed by: 

“The premise that Graves lays out for her readers is a good one. The writing? Not to be unkind, but Graves could have used a good editor.”

Reviewed by: 

“The story is a good cozy read, and the reader will be challenged to ride along with the characters and try to learn who the criminal is before Sammy does.

Reviewed by: 

“This is not a fast read, nor is it a satisfying ending to a confusing story.

Reviewed by: 

“Beginning with that very first sentence, this novel is definitely one for the historical mystery buff.

Reviewed by: 

“a very interesting novel in which the concept of the discovery of a missing child’s remains giving closure to the family is a cogent one in today’s society.”

Reviewed by: 

“This is a fun book to read. It moves quickly and logically in spite of the many clues Penney throws in Iris’ path.

Reviewed by: 

“an intriguing and tightly written drama, pointing out as it does that what one wishes to be true, and what actually is the truth don’t always mesh.”

Reviewed by: 

“One of Hand’s remarkable abilities is the deftness with which she creates dynamic and unique voices for each point-of-view character, helping the reader track multiple storylines throughou

Reviewed by: 

“Martin Edwards crafts vivid descriptions of both character and setting that embed the reader into the scene in a way few writers can achieve.”

“DeDakis, a former journalist, can’t decide whether he’s writing a mystery, a political roman à clef or a YA book, and the result is none of the above.”

Reviewed by: 

“a lip-smacking light mystery flavored with lovable characters and Southern charm that readers of cozies will devour along with the scrumptious recipes included at the end.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“when it comes to gritty real life plots, believable characters, and on-point descriptions of both people and place Thomas Keis can't be beat.”

Reviewed by: 

“Buzzelli presents a good story with lots of twists and turns but enough clues to keep the reader turning the page to meet the next part of the conundrum.”

Reviewed by: 

Well-researched historical fiction takes readers to new (old) places and brings the time and people alive. That is, if the story works as a story.

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

Lady Georgie Rannoch has come a long way since the Royal Spyness series began.

Reviewed by: 

“as easy to read as one of Mr. Dickens’ actual novels and as entertaining. As the subtitle reveals, it’s a Dickens of a tale . . .”

Reviewed by: 

Shamed, book number 11 in The Kate Burkholder series very well stands on its own, offering many twists and turns along with descriptive reference

Reviewed by: 

“Lincoln scholar Putnam has once again woven a fact-based story into an entertaining fiction for his readers to enjoy.”

Reviewed by: 

“The Sentence Is Death . . . may just be one of summer’s greatest, guiltiest pleasures . . .

Reviewed by: 

“The interchange between Gwen and Iris is worth the price of admission. It is a laugh out loud escapade that would fit perfectly on British Channel 4.”

Reviewed by: 

“Jessica Fletcher experiences numerous crises, a lot of tension, and a multitude of unexpected events as she falls down this rabbit hole while investigating two murders and attempting to pr

Reviewed by: 

“this really extraordinary volume stands to become the new benchmark narrative . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“As the 24th novel in this long-running series, Bitter Brew is a welcome entry in which Savannah Reid’s detecting skills shine.”

Pages