Civil Rights

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“The author sees more than 200 years of judicial interpretation of fundamental rights as having devolved into a zero sum game, with winners and losers declared by unelected judges, leaving

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“In Gates’ capable hands The Black Church is a stirring story, told with compassion, respect, and not a little awe.”

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“An affecting blend of memoir and history, Shaking the Gates of Hell offers an unflinching account of a family in a tumultuous time.”

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American history is “littered with utopian experiments that began with giddy promise and ended in depressing failure,” writes Thomas Healy. In Soul City, he tells one such story.

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“Alter provides a multi-dimensional portrait of an American president’s journey as a husband, father, and perhaps his most fulfilling role, as humanitarian.”

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Life of a Klansman is . . .

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Author Laila Lalami came to the US from Morocco in 1992. In 2000, she became US citizen. But Lalami does not fit neat categories defining US personhood. Neither, she argues, do many others.

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“Christopher Caldwell may be on the receiving end of the slings and arrows of the liberal governmental and cultural elite he scorns in this book.

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In the post-Charlottesville world where the President of the United States continues to enable these “very fine people” with a deliberate blind eye to the intensity of the

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Nelson Mandela wrote hundreds of letters from August 5, 1962, until February 11, 1990. Prison Letters is a selection.

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“Polchin has collected innumerable long-lost newspaper stories of anonymous sex crimes involving gay men and, through careful analysis, given them historical and political

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“Is a baby a commodity? Is pregnancy and childbirth work? Is raising a child a job?”  

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Kashmir has been a conflict zone since 1989. Nation-states have the power to nip idealism in the bud. Vested interests play a role in keeping conflict simmering.

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“In documenting this country’s fateful journey from slavery through thwarted Reconstruction to segregation, Luxenberg paints on a broad canvas, elegantly narrating several captivating and s

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“Chancer’s study is well-intentioned and well-argued, but does it answer the fundamental challenge it poses: Is it possible to ‘take back a revolution’?”

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“Marty’s Handbook for a Post-Roe America is all the more important.”

 

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“In brisk, vigorous, precise prose honed over decades of daily newspaper work, Gilliam paints a vivid portrait of the obstacles she faced as a black woman breaking multiple barriers in the

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“Placeless People delves deeply into the philosophy of human rights but with easy prose and a structure that would give anyone pause when thinking about our times.

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In “The Accidental Rebel,” an op-ed published in The New York Times on the 40th anniversary of the Columbia student uprising of 1968, novelist Paul Auster (Columbia ’69) asserted that stud

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"A Fierce Glory offers spectacle over detail to the benefit of understanding."

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It has been asked before, regarding topics which have previously received considerable attention from the publishing world: Is it really necessary for another book on this subject?

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“General readers, with no initiation in law, will learn quite a bit about racial discrimination, civil rights laws, and how academics grapple with theoretical difficulties underlying race r

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“An American Quilt [is] nothing less than a reexamination of American history through the lens of race, class, and gender.”

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