Civil Rights

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“In documenting this country’s fateful journey from slavery through thwarted Reconstruction to segregation, Luxenberg paints on a broad canvas, elegantly narrating several captivating and s

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“Chancer’s study is well-intentioned and well-argued, but does it answer the fundamental challenge it poses: Is it possible to ‘take back a revolution’?”

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“Marty’s Handbook for a Post-Roe America is all the more important.”

 

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“In brisk, vigorous, precise prose honed over decades of daily newspaper work, Gilliam paints a vivid portrait of the obstacles she faced as a black woman breaking multiple barriers in the

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“Placeless People delves deeply into the philosophy of human rights but with easy prose and a structure that would give anyone pause when thinking about our times.

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In “The Accidental Rebel,” an op-ed published in The New York Times on the 40th anniversary of the Columbia student uprising of 1968, novelist Paul Auster (Columbia ’69) asserted that stud

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"A Fierce Glory offers spectacle over detail to the benefit of understanding."

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It has been asked before, regarding topics which have previously received considerable attention from the publishing world: Is it really necessary for another book on this subject?

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“General readers, with no initiation in law, will learn quite a bit about racial discrimination, civil rights laws, and how academics grapple with theoretical difficulties underlying race r

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“An American Quilt [is] nothing less than a reexamination of American history through the lens of race, class, and gender.”

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well researched and well written, chronicling some of the major protest successes and failures of the last 70 years.”

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In Speak Freely, Keith Whittington, a professor of politics at Princeton University, defends free speech at colleges and universities, bemoaning that ideological activists, from both left

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“Gordon argues that the Klan represents how some of the most primitive political passions are rooted in fear and hatred of otherness—and a willingness to exploit these sentiments for purpos

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“Have Black Lives Ever Mattered? is powerful, disturbing, well-written, and an important book for our day.”

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Geoffrey Stone’s Sex and the Constitution: Sex, Religion, and Law from America's Origins to the Twenty-First Century is one of the most importa

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"This is a book for everyone who has ever questioned the validity of the “war on drugs,” the “war on poverty,” or any other governmental attempt to solve social ills . . ."

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The focus of this book is “the use of employment law and practices in the United States to exclude gay people from public social spaces.” The book focuses on discrimination in the U.S.

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Last year, journalist Michelangelo Signorile’s It’s Not Over detailed how the right wing and some religious groups were working feverishly with antigay organizations to attack any pro-gay

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This is not one Till tale but three. When young Emmett Till was murdered in Money, Mississippi, in 1955, his death changed the Civil Rights Movement and American history.

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Lillian Faderman received the 2016 Anisfield-Wolf Book award for The Gay Revolution. That alone makes this book worth reading.

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"Prisoners," wrote Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, "retain the essence of human dignity. . . .

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Don’t talk to police! What? Why not? Law professor James J. Duane tells you why; and if you do not heed his advice, you do so at your peril. Does that shock you?

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In the opening pages of March: Book Three, the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama has just ended its Sunday school lessons when a bomb explodes.

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“If Americans understood the extent to which policing fails to supervise itself, fails to rid the system of corrupt or corrosive cops, they would likely be shocked.”

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American “exceptionalism” has once again become a political headline. Few candidates would dare to challenge the underlying truth that America is simply better than all other nations.

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