Political & Social Science

Reviewed by: 

Audience of One: Donald Trump, Television, and the Fracturing of America is a must read for those who want to understand the media phenomenon now in the White House.”

Reviewed by: 

The Assault on American Excellence is a fantastic book. Its research is impeccable, and the writing is superb.”

Reviewed by: 

“This work by Brown, Lipton, and Morisy reminds us that the powerful institutions of the federal government are only as good as the men and women who lead them.”

Reviewed by: 

Life Undercover reveals the rewards that serving the country provide as well as the toll this service extracts with an intimate and compelling portrait of a woman who literally co

Reviewed by: 

“As an anthology, Leadership in War offers a fine, if not overly in-depth sampling of wartime leadership to show that successful wartime leadership is a rare commodity.

Reviewed by: 

Operation Devil Horns is the type of book that will make you proud and make your blood boil.”

Reviewed by: 

Minda Harts has written a “how-to memo” for women of color in the workplace. It reads less like a guidebook and more like a conversation over drinks after work, in mixed company.

Reviewed by: 

“The radicals in Holly Jackson’s informative book speak not only with truth and passion but with a vision of a different, better America.” 

Reviewed by: 

“this is a good read for any empathetic, intellectually alive reader wondering about the world and the meaning of life.”

Reviewed by: 

“This book is highly recommended for anyone who wants to be more informed about issues related to our water supply, steps being taken to improve the situation, and ideas for the future.”

Reviewed by: 

“In pursuing Weinstein, the authors found that the casting couch system, long entrenched in Hollywood, still existed, though perhaps in a mutated form.

Reviewed by: 

“[An] insightful and penetrating study of the history of conservative nationalism in the United States.”

Reviewed by: 

“Anyone seeking to understand the deepest issues in world affairs should read this book, absorbing its positive contributions and debating whatever seems questionable.”            

Reviewed by: 

James Baldwin described his country as a burning fire. “Living in fire” was to “relentlessly rage.” It wasn’t the people that angered him but what made them.

Reviewed by: 

Professor Breen has done an outstanding job of closing the loop on telling the untapped history of the average American’s role in deciding to throw off British rule and es

Reviewed by: 

“Although its parts are fine, their sum does not quite add up to what we expect in a book by Gladwell.”

Reviewed by: 

Fully Automated Luxury Communism is an accessible, intelligent, and profoundly optimistic text with the potential to spark a revolution.”

Reviewed by: 

“For those with an interest in American social and cultural history, this is a well-written, insightful, and incisive work that provides much to consider on a longtime controversial issue.”

Reviewed by: 

The Ungrateful Immigrant soars when Nayeri tells her own story. . . . It’s a moving exploration of the lasting impact of losing one’s country.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“The West needs to overcome its amnesia with respect to Maoism’s global ambitions. Lovell’s study of Maoism as a global history could not be more timely.”

Reviewed by: 

“Robin Marty and Jessica Mason Pieklo make clear that the likely end of Roe v Wade is at hand and involved more than the end of Roe.” 

Reviewed by: 

Empire of Borders provides fundamental, essential information about the current human situation at the borders.”  

Reviewed by: 

“In Me the People, Nadia Urbinati has produced an exceptional scholarly work on a highly relevant socio-political phenomenon.”

Reviewed by: 

“Jennifer Silva serves as much as an academic scholar as a personal therapist, and a reader has to ask how she could endure the endless suffering experienced by her all-too-honest subjects.

Reviewed by: 

“Confessions of a Rogue Nuclear Regulator is short, easy to read, and quickly gets to the point, while avoiding many of the questions any astute reader might raise.

Pages