Travel

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“Whatever you cook or don’t cook, this book is a trip to the islands or islas of the world.”

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“a breezy, nonstop narrative capturing the essence of a crazy, wide-open town where criminals and entrepreneurs have long thrived.”

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Best of the World: 1,000 Destinations of a Lifetime is worthy of the National Geographic imprimatur, providing tips and insights that strike a solid balance between depth and brea

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In her introduction to this memoir, Donna Leon confesses, “I have never planned more than the first step in anything I’ve done.” Perhaps that is why Wandering through Life is a series of s

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“The Green Book was more than just a road trip guide but a way of survival. Hall hopes that it’s history will live on.”

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Compass Lines is a stunning travelogue and memoir about culture, travel, employment, searching for life’s meaning, and, especially, searching for home and family.”

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“Glamping: Glamorous Camping in the Great Outdoors aims to extoll the joys of luxurious outdoorsmanship via 60 profiles of notable glamping spots, accompanied by a generous samplin

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“Less than a decade away from his infamous court-martial for insubordination, General Mitchell came up with a simple proposal to capture the imagination of the American public: a race acros

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The Flatboat Patience’s colorful come-and-go crew of cosplaying and pedantic historical re-enactors, a gadget-head food-snob galley chef, and alternately doomsaying and day-saving

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“In these days of isolation and disconnection, Carlson shows us how to enrich our own landscapes, both inner and outer. What seems barren at first can reveal hidden treasures.”

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In the winter of 1949 the celebrated French avant-garde artist Jean Cocteau came to New York to give a talk at the screening of his latest film, The Eagle with Two Heads.

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Lost in the Valley of Death is a disturbing book that leaves you with a sense of wonder and a sense of unease. It’s a book that is not easy to put down.”

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“Filled with vivid first-person accounts, Traveling Black is a superb history that captures a shameful aspect of the American story.”

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Though Tom Zoellner’s The National Road: Dispatches from a Changing America came out at the end of this unprecedented year, it is unlikely that even the author could have imagined the “cha

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Americans have stopped listening—to each other and to their institutions.

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“entertaining, inspirational, and visceral; a moving narrative of typically missed breadcrumbs on the way to meaningful connections.

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Whether new to Middle-Earth or a veteran pilgrim, anyone will learn much in this book.

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“The book captures, in broad outline, the precarity of the migrant world—leaving behind a very meager existence to venture into the foggy haze of endemic risk, threat, and violence.”

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“a powerful and fascinating approach to the great crisis of our time. And it gets to the heart of why climate change such a vexing and all-encompassing challenge.”

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Secondhand tells an important story about consumerism gone wild, the complex industry that has grown around its detritus, and how we can push back on an entrenched culture of disp

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“Eating his way through Hong Kong does have its squeamish moments including, ‘warm paper bags filled with squid balls or barbequed octopus tentacles stuck on little bamboo sticks.’”

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Paul Gauguin (1838–1903) is a compelling figure, both as an artist and man.

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“The ruminations and peregrinations gathered up into this contemplative collection should motivate her readers to seek out her past forays into other forgotten corners of the earth, which r

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