Presidents & Heads of State

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“Pipes recounts the gradual process by which through the sheer force of his intellect, Richard Nixon became relevant again to the debates about America’s proper role in the world.”

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When someone says, “She’s a lesbian, but really nice,” the “but” reveals unfair bias. Jonathan Hansen’s “revisionist” account of Fidel Castro is of this sort.

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“To quote from The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, ‘When the legend becomes fact, print the legend.’ Fortunately for us, author Clay Risen printed both.”

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“The Crowded Hour, with a rousing narrative, does Roosevelt justice, but it serves even better in explaining the 1898 war."

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“The Impeachers: The Trial of Andrew Johnson and the Dream of a Just Nation is not only an important book that reminds us of a historical moment we might have been

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“Hitler’s Death represents a useful contribution to the neverending literature dealing in some way with the life and death of this most despicable of human beings.

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“It has been 15 years since Ronald Reagan’s death and more than 30 years since he left the White House, yet most historians and biographers continue to misunderstand the man and the reasons

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“Haig’s Coup will also appeal to a broader audience, painting a picture that is tantamount to a wreck on the freeway from which we cannot avert our eyes.

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“a cautionary tale of ambition, service, and the passing down of the mantel of public service from father to son . . .”

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“if you really want to be creeped out and want a sleepless night, enter the unsavory and often seedy world of ‘Javanka’ where ruthlessness, egotism, and pure ignorance run rampant.” 

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“In this book, the personal overwhelms the political.

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“should be treasured by baseball historians and students of international relations, as well as, anyone interested in baseball, Cuba, and American foreign policy.”

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“Leadership: In Turbulent Times cannot prescribe answers for the vexing questions of our own, fraught times, but it issues an authentic reminder of the traits and

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Read this book and you will be more thankful and even proud to be part of the human race from which this woman (and her husband) emerged.

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“Rauchway provides valuable insights into the minds and motivations of Herbert Hoover and Franklin Roosevelt and, in so doing, offers a valuable contribution to American political science t

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“Winston Groom’s The Allies: Roosevelt, Churchill, Stalin, and the Unlikely Alliance That Won World War II will hopefully help a new generation le

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“Churchill: The Statesman as Artist is a comprehensive assembly of Churchill’s contributions as an artist as critical to, yet distinct from, his legendary role as

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“Andrew Roberts has written the best single-volume biography of Winston Churchill to date.”

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What do we have to truly fear about President Donald Trump? He pulled off the successful re-negotiation of the North America Free Trade agreement.

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“The Heidlers tell an engrossing story that covers a remarkably complex history in relatively few pages. It is a true page-turner.”

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“My aim in this book,” writes Polish historian Adam Zamoyski in his captivating new biography of Napoleon Bonaparte, “is not to justify or condemn, but to piece together his life . . .

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At the time of his death in 1625, at age 55, James I of England had been already ill with several maladies of the time, but rumors immediately surfaced that he had been poisoned by George Villiers,

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Was there a way for candidate Barack Obama to address chaos in Iraq while also calling for pursuit of Osama bin Laden lodged in a corner of putative partner Pakistan?

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Statesmen . . . should be judged not by the purity of their ideals and intentions, but by the consequences of their actions and policies.”

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“reaffirms the reality of international politics that no resolution is ever permanent; no victory is ever final.”

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