Science & Math

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“a neat little introduction to Germany’s excellent, but ultimately ineffective jet fighter.”

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In her often witty and trenchant publication calling for revolution through female alliance, legal expert Diane L.

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“Valentine’s book is . . . a unique and engaging reference work that all Christie fans should enjoy.”

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The author grew up in France near Lyon, the gastronomic capital of the world. Her parents were so focused on food and each other that she—an only child—felt like an outsider.

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“As its story unfolds from Kennedy to Johnson to Nixon, Silent Spring Revolution proves consistently captivating, and it takes its place alongside trilogy-mates The Wilderness

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“Less than a decade away from his infamous court-martial for insubordination, General Mitchell came up with a simple proposal to capture the imagination of the American public: a race acros

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“Whether one is interested in cold case puzzles or genealogy, or just curious about solving crimes, The Forever Witness should be read and reread until it becomes a dog-eared part

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“The book, in sum, is a polemic rather than a serious attempt to sort out the science that informs policy and practice that would be a pathway to a better human future as the planet and all

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The Rise and Reign of the Mammals is an important book, full of fascinating mammals and the dramatic history of mammal paleontology.”

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“Perhaps dogs can’t teach us how to live but, by their joyful presence and abundant love, they help us live better.”

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Temple Grandin doesn’t write captivating prose. A reader who needs to be entertained may miss out on what Grandin has to offer.

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One reads Miguel Missé’s The Myth of the Wrong Body with growing excitement and thumping of the air not just because of one’s sympathy with its content, but also because of his sociologica

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Another cab driver, and it’s more questions about civil society on Mars, if there’s life on other planets (never mind the microbes), should we worry about an alien invasion, and why are we here on

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“Aguon is a skilled and heartfelt writer, and his book will most likely be inspiring to readers who share his political analysis and seek out the personal stories hidden by geo-political co

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The Day I Die is an informative and accessible addition to the literature of death and dying.

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Writing a book on neuroscience that is decipherable by the average reader is no easy task.

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The Covid-19 plague descended with a vengeance on New York City in early March 2020. The city was utterly unprepared, including its preeminent hospitals.

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“Neanderthals belong to a distant past of hundreds of thousands of years but studying them is a rapidly developing race to the future of scientific exploration.

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Challenges to Darwin’s view of the sexes are no longer a minority sport, though like all challenges to received opinion they have difficulty being heard in the Establishment they wish to rock.

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Wired for Love reminds us that love is as natural as a heartbeat, a breath, a brainwave.”

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“A superb and well-researched account of a notorious chemical and the clash it has provoked between science and corporate doubters.”

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“Often riveting, well-researched, and utterly convincing, this book sounds a frightening alarm about unreliable expert testimony in the courtroom.”

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“well-written, informative, sometimes fascinating, yet difficult book to unreservedly recommend.”

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“Hong’s memoir is as perfect in tone and pitch as a memoir can be.”

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