Science & Math

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“The world we love is in our hands and so are the practical, effective, and daily choices that will protect our future.”

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“How to Avoid a Climate Disaster is a primer for every citizen and a checklist for specialists to make sure they have the big picture.”                            

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“Liz Heinecke has shined a light on two remarkable women whose work and friendship was a gift to each other and to the world.”

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Nearly two dozen outstanding articles on climate change, just in time for the U.S. return to the Paris accords. Now, what?

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“As a welcome surprise, Seven and a Half Lessons is part self-help book on how to manage our own quirky brains and part manifesto on how to move forward to heal this country’s poli

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Katherine Standefer’s memoir about the medical device that saved her life and her quest to discover what it cost in terms of the environment and human lives starts with a jolt and keeps up the pace

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“From whale song to whalefall, Giggs’ science writing is deeply researched and as fascinating as the whales themselves . . .”

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“Norberg’s ability to distill lessons for today from thousands of years of world history will stimulate and enlighten both general readers and professional scholars.”

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This oral history of the story of COVID-19 in the USA from the start of the year until early June is a helpful reminder as to how much of this year like no other panned out.

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“a solid, valuable work on a critical aspect of America’s wartime quest for an atomic bomb.”

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Livewired is a challenging and enlightening description of one of the greatest mysteries of our time: the brain and how it functions.”

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False Alarm is a comprehensive analysis of the issues in climate change that represents a reasoned balance between the shrill voices demanding immediate change .

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The title echoes Virginia Woolf’s non-negotiable insistence that a woman writer needs a “room of one’s own,” and at the same time reflects one of the academic detours that Rita Colwell took when bl

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“Churchland’s take on conscience is likely messier than most of us will find comfort in, yearning as we do for moral clarity and certainty in order to make our decisions easier and put our

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“The book’s underlying thesis is simple: The skin is a living, permeable ‘dynamic interface,’ ‘a complex, diverse ecosystem.’”

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a fascinating book that resides in the space between science journalism and memoir.”

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“Reality isn’t what it appears to be. Our perception of reality is a construction of the brain, and science is achieving what decades ago seemed impossible.”

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“We should teach philosophers like Roa. We owe it to Galileo. But it’s unlikely because of science deniers, more prevalent than Livio allows.”

Author(s):
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Stan Cox is one of those few people who dared predict the future and then watched it become true.

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“The most readable tour of cosmology from the perspective of the multiverse to date.”

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John Johnson Jr, author of Zwicky, tells the fascinating life story of the imaginative and abrasive astrophysicist Fritz Zwicky, providing historical context and also biographies of collea

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