Science & Math

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“With the comics and the cleverly designed art, this book has something for everybody. And those with a keener curiosity will find plenty to satisfy their elemental interest.”

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Seaweed Chronicles is the story of a place as told by the once abundant creatures that became resources for human use, and the last harvest left: the habitat, or rather the ocean forests o

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Beneath hooded lids He stares across the apse in Palermo’s cathedral, His face and neck line-etched with suffering, robe draped across His shoulder, one hand outstretched along the curved wall and

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You were drawn to this review because of the bold title, right?

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An authoritative tour of the brain. Groundbreaking research into how the brain processes information.

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By the beginning of the Great War in 1914, it became clear that the internal combustion automobile was edging out its rival steam cars and electric cars.

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“let’s also turn back to myth, reframing our scientific narrative within the history of the stories we tell ourselves about what we’re still trying to understand.”

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Scientific literacy is important, so it’s no surprise that Guy P.

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Over the last few days of January 1967, three dozen experts in botany, pharmacology, chemistry, anthropology, and psychiatry gathered at the medical school at the University of California in San Fr

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In spite of previous written and documentary video accounts of John Wesley Powell’s trip down the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon, relatively little is known about the man and the rest of h

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“Extreme Cities offers a mix of postmodernism, revolutionary ideology with only a few moments of rational clarity to imagine a dystopian future shaped by the force

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Pregnancy can be both an exhilarating and terrifying time in a person’s life, especially with the glut of conflicting information on the market.

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“If ever a book were to be called magisterial, this one is.

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A shrewd observer of our national character, the late Tom Wolfe tapped extravagant stories drawn from real life and refined them in the fires of his imagination.

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“Swiping our smartphones reorganizes the brain’s sensory-motor maps for the hand.

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There are few people who could competently write The Biological Mind, but Alan Jasanoff is one of those individuals.

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What It’s Like to Be a Dog is a well-written, enthusiastic account of a scientific study sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) to image dogs’ brains by Magnetic Resonance Imager

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“Do I know too much, or too little?” he asks. Very much an anti-reductionist, when he sees a flock of birds floating on air, he doesn’t think numbers or gravity.

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“He takes the reader on a journey from single cells, to nervous systems, to self-conscious, self-directed minds. One can’t fault him for lack of vision or ambition.”

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“a brilliantly crafted discussion of the limits imposed by our natural reserves, combining historical analysis, economic development and political decision making.”

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If you work with children, The Deepest Well: Healing the Long-Term Effects of Childhood Adversity by Nadine Burke Harris MD may be the most important book you read this year.

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Told in the form of a letter from an imaginary planet named Globux to the inhabitants of Earth, Our Beautiful Earth: Saving Our Planet Piece by Piece is an innovative picture book that att

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Born and raised in India, Shoba Narayan left for college in the U.S. and stayed for the next 20 years.

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“The Wizard and the Prophet shows that even the ‘latest’ ideas on creation and energy have origins in the modern beginnings of the environmental movement.”

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