Science & Math

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“Simard’s pioneering research gives us a new way of looking and living with the floral world . . .”

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“Sam Kean’s crisp, bright storytelling makes these tales of out-of-control scientists irresistible.”

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“Cobb is stridently warning us of imminent ecological peril and the need to systemic transformation of our systems of production and consumption.”

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“Well-written, unexpectedly engaging, and perhaps a bit overlong, After Cooling is a knockout debut by a gifted writer.”

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“England sleeps still from valley to hill.” That’s a line from a song by Amazing Blondel, a British group that imagined an Arcadian rural past.

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What if all that was needed to stave off an impending mass extinction of life on Earth was to set aside half the planet for nature?

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David Gessner succeeds in this friendly and reflective study of a great writer and our times.”

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“Jeff Shesol shows how to detail one intriguing tale after another while backing every word with hundreds of bits and bytes found in library archives, government documents, memoirs, and int

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Together John Fredrickson and John Andrews have put together a fascinating account of Boeing's history with special focus on the dramatic changes necessary to produce the

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The first thing to say about Elizabeth Blackwell and her younger sister Emily is that they were formidable women.

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“Berger does a great job here of not only profiling SpaceX, but also capturing the total brinksmanship of its swashbuckling founder.”

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“The chapters on spite and freedom, politics and what is sacred to us are an insightful, relevant, and welcome commentary on what to make of our current hate-filled political climate.”

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In November 1995, theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking (1942–2018) sold out London’s Royal Albert Hall (capacity: 5,900) for a lecture entitled “Does God Throw Dice in Black Holes?” A physicist ha

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Imagine that sequoias and cedars, lilies and laurels, even daffodils and daisies, and indeed all the plants of our green world formed their own vast and diverse country, one that spanned the Earth,

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Boeing 737: The World’s Most Controversial Commercial Jetliner is handsomely published on coated paper that allows the amazing number of Boeing 737 photographs to look their best.

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“Humans have probably been extinguishing bird species for thousands of years,” writes Michelle Nijhuis in her absorbing history of species conservation, Beloved Beasts.

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“The world we love is in our hands and so are the practical, effective, and daily choices that will protect our future.”

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“How to Avoid a Climate Disaster is a primer for every citizen and a checklist for specialists to make sure they have the big picture.”                            

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“Liz Heinecke has shined a light on two remarkable women whose work and friendship was a gift to each other and to the world.”

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Nearly two dozen outstanding articles on climate change, just in time for the U.S. return to the Paris accords. Now, what?

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“As a welcome surprise, Seven and a Half Lessons is part self-help book on how to manage our own quirky brains and part manifesto on how to move forward to heal this country’s poli

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Katherine Standefer’s memoir about the medical device that saved her life and her quest to discover what it cost in terms of the environment and human lives starts with a jolt and keeps up the pace

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“From whale song to whalefall, Giggs’ science writing is deeply researched and as fascinating as the whales themselves . . .”

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“Norberg’s ability to distill lessons for today from thousands of years of world history will stimulate and enlighten both general readers and professional scholars.”

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