Science & Math

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The Covid-19 plague descended with a vengeance on New York City in early March 2020. The city was utterly unprepared, including its preeminent hospitals.

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“Neanderthals belong to a distant past of hundreds of thousands of years but studying them is a rapidly developing race to the future of scientific exploration.

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Challenges to Darwin’s view of the sexes are no longer a minority sport, though like all challenges to received opinion they have difficulty being heard in the Establishment they wish to rock.

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Wired for Love reminds us that love is as natural as a heartbeat, a breath, a brainwave.”

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“A superb and well-researched account of a notorious chemical and the clash it has provoked between science and corporate doubters.”

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“Often riveting, well-researched, and utterly convincing, this book sounds a frightening alarm about unreliable expert testimony in the courtroom.”

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“well-written, informative, sometimes fascinating, yet difficult book to unreservedly recommend.”

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“Hong’s memoir is as perfect in tone and pitch as a memoir can be.”

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Information flows at a rapid pace. Following a plane crash, people are anxious to know the cause. Little factual information is available.

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“This is one of those books perfectly made for both casual browsing and in-depth study, providing enough detail for the serious student along with eye-grabbing photography and illustrations

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“a well-written, well-argued book about how we can make a real difference in preventing suicide by challenging the assumptions we have about why people kill themselves and addressing oursel

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“‘all human cultures share one common trait: they adapt constantly in response to all manner of variables. .  .  . and long-term success .  .  .

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“Forty-eight brief and provocative chapters provide much to consider. Is it too much to call this latest book magisterial?

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“Doubilet offers, in perfect drawings of light, a place and a moment where a bird can love a fish, the sky can love the sea and, for a brief instant, in a razor-thin place, we can all be ri

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"The Path to a Livable Future may be the most serious and thought-provoking new book on climate change available.

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“The premise that cognition and consciousness are traits that arise not solely from the brain but also involve the body, or soma (as in the common word ‘somatic’), is not new.”

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“Giulio Boccaletti in Water: A Biography tells a history of human manipulation of the environment.

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“Mark Piesing in N-4 Down explores the least remembered of this forgotten era: the story of Roald Amundsen, Umberto Nobile, and their airship adventures in the Arctic.”

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It’s nice to know where we come from. Some folks are still taking it hard that we descended from apes, but there are new discoveries all the time.

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“The Hero myth—the drive to seek safety, control and power over the Earth—that has powered Western capitalism and civilization has gone too far.

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“Simard’s pioneering research gives us a new way of looking and living with the floral world . . .”

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“Sam Kean’s crisp, bright storytelling makes these tales of out-of-control scientists irresistible.”

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“Cobb is stridently warning us of imminent ecological peril and the need to systemic transformation of our systems of production and consumption.”

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“Well-written, unexpectedly engaging, and perhaps a bit overlong, After Cooling is a knockout debut by a gifted writer.”

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“England sleeps still from valley to hill.” That’s a line from a song by Amazing Blondel, a British group that imagined an Arcadian rural past.

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