Coming of Age

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There’s a memorable line in the Latin American classic Women With Big Eyes that reads, “Aunt Daniela fell in love the way intelligent women always fall in love: like an idiot.”

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“The structure of Tom Lake is wonderfully measured as Patchett weaves the fine details of dual timelines together. . . .

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“it is the combination of the Western novel and Eastern fable that allows the reader to become totally enthralled. . . . ravishingly written.”

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"one of the sharpest, funniest, first date scenes in contemporary fiction"

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When the Missouri Ran Red is fast-paced and action-packed, and while rich with detail the narrative never bogs down in the specifics.”

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“a compelling, unique read.”

From the first paragraph, this debut novel grabs the reader with its voice as well as its dramatic plot setup:

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“a different vampire story, one that reveals more than a little poignancy as it strips away the gothic glamor and shows that vampires are merely people in a changed form . . .”

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a poignant tale that doesn’t shy from sharp edges, a universal story both timeless and timely.”

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A tale to please YA readers and well beyond, it’s a poignant story that doesn’t shy from sharp edges, universal, timeless, and timely.”

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Joseph Conrad lived from 1857–1924. Both during his lifetime and for the near-century since his death, he has been celebrated as a present past master of English prose.

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“This book is impressive as a picture of life in North Korea, but it goes beyond that, elevating the story into one that gets to the heart of what is so corrosive about propaganda, what is

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“The entire Scholomance series is a master work of storytelling, filled with memorable characters, an original world, complex personal politics, difficult choices with real consequences, an

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“King knocks it smoothly out of the park.”

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Foster . . . is a rare, beautiful, multi-faceted, shimmering, gem of a work—a gift.”

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In echoing Dickens, Barbara Kingsolver has written a social justice novel all her own, one only she could write, for our time and for the ages.

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“Wade’s pitch-perfect, personality-driven dialogue sings in the voice of life, and his ability to meld existential thought, situational metaphor, and cinematic setting is a full-bodied expe

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“incandescent”

The narrator of Yiyun Li’s newest book is Agnes, but she insists the story she tells isn’t really about her, but about her best friend Fabienne:

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"‘Becoming the library, as if it were swallowing her whole . . . an infinite nothing—everything, a god—no, a place—which is it? . . . a realm, a guide, a library, a god.’"

The Teller of Secrets by Bisi Adjapon is a coming of age, character-based novel that follows Esi’s first-person recounting of her girlhood in newly independent Ghana in the 1960s.

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Once Upon a Wardrobe tells the story of the inspirational threads author C. S. Lewis wove together in his 1950 fantasy novel for children, The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe.

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“A vigorous road novel teeming with wild hairpin turns and irresistible, enduring characters . . .”

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“The plot barrels along at an intense pace, straight into . . . a shocking cliffhanger of an ending.

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“Sally Rooney doesn’t repeat herself. Rather, she is a pentimento artist, building a familiar world in a way that makes it feel boldly new.”

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