Literary Criticism

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“A masterful job of bringing Orwell’s complex personality and incredibly prescient thinking vividly to life.”

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This powerful little book belongs to the Object Lessons series described by one admirer in the flyleaf as “the most consistently interesting non-fiction book series in America” (Megan Volpert,

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“In this short, stunning work, with his inimitable use of language, Baldwin distills the essence of his pain and wisdom and points a way for our own time.”

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in Philip Roth: The Biography, Blake Bailey provides ample evidence of his understanding of modern American literature and the frailties and achievements of an ar

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Rudyard Kipling—the Anglo Indian novelist, short story writer, and bard of the British Empire—must have known that it wasn't true when he wrote, "East is East, and West is West, and Never the twain

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If you have read only smaller portions of Dostoevsky, Christofi’s account will send you off to look for more.

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A venture titled Bookmarked has been launched by Ig Publishing. The theory and practice of the series is that a writer considers some other writer’s book that influenced her or him greatly.

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Sven Birkerts’ book-length critique of Speak, Memory is a meditation on the nature of time, the past, language, literature, and the self.

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“Solzhenitsyn and the American Culture should serve as a reminder to those of us in the West that civilization is fragile, that democracy and liberty are forever u

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“To be born in the street means to wander all your life, to be free. It means accident and incident, drama, movement. It means above all dream . . .”

—Henry Miller

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The Bright Book of Life is a work worth dipping into again and again and following along with Bloom and his lifetime of reading the best of the best novels.”

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“Souder’s biography is a stylistic portrait of a towering American original.”

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“Becoming familiar with the Elizabethan language is not easy, but Edmondson and Wells have taken it to a new level with their detail and final explanations.”

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What Were We Thinking will give you a fascinating overview and analysis of the books that explain where we are now, how we got here, and where we might be headed.”

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Sylvia Plath wrote some of the best poetry of the 20th century, but her work gets less attention than the way she died. So argues Heather Clark.

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“Engaging and provocative, Diamond’s encyclopedic meditation will certainly help readers—no matter where they live—think about what lies ahead for the outlying areas of our cities.”

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Nick Flynn’s mother set fire to their house and later killed herself.

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The inspiration for Marjorie Garber’s interesting but ultimately frustrating book seems to be the political ascendancy of Donald Trump.

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Whether new to Middle-Earth or a veteran pilgrim, anyone will learn much in this book.

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“a fascinating book about Whitman, his poetry, and the ways queer life has evolved in America over the last three centuries . . .”

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Not Even Past is a trenchant, wide-ranging survey of the history that binds us a nation while, at the same time, drives us apart.

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Unfinished Business: Notes of a Chronic Re-Reader is pure Vivian Gornick—not always easy reading, but sufficiently gripping to make us carry on, page after page,

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Emily Dickinson has been called the greatest poet in the English language. She is also “America’s most enigmatic and mysterious poet.” But she is not mysterious, according to Martha Ackman.

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Monster, She Wrote is a lovely volume for new readers, and an excellent gift for oddball teens, but it should be backed up with more resources for those seeking k

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