Literary Criticism

Reviewed by: 

“For as Lynskey charts the admittedly astonishing reception of a narrative so adaptable as to be embraced by the Black Panthers and to be approved by the John Birch Society both, one wonder

Reviewed by: 

“[S]ome empowering concepts and more than a few compelling arguments should you decide to approach Don’t Read Poetry . . .

Reviewed by: 

What if we took seriously the form of thinking that we find in tragedy, and the experience of partial agency, limited autonomy, deep traumatic affect, agnostic conflict, g

Reviewed by: 

Arguably the world’s first novel, The Tale of Genji was written by a Japanese noblewoman known as Murasaki Shikibu around the year 1,000 CE.

Reviewed by: 

Summer Brennan takes on much more than just the high heel.

Reviewed by: 

“Paul Klee: Life and Work gathers together the full spectrum of Klee’s frame of mind, revealing his character through his artistic personality.”

Reviewed by: 

The Wedding Guest proves once again why this series has become the longest-running American crime series.”      

Reviewed by: 

“miraculously, out these broken lives and troubled minds emerged the glory and beauty that is the science fiction genre.”

Author(s):
Translator(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Set in the midst of one of the darkest moments of human history, between the horrors of Nazism and Stalinist Communism, this book not only portrays an attempt to find meaning and comfort t

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

The trope of the murdered “dead girl” serves as a catalyst for many popular crime narratives, from bestselling thrillers to limited TV series to true crime podcasts.

Reviewed by: 

“Persuasive and meticulously researched, Shakespeare and the Resistance is a must read for anyone interested in the study and interpretation of Shakespearian era politics or litera

Reviewed by: 

In the fall of 1948 Ernest Hemingway and his fourth wife Mary traveled to Europe, staying in Venice for a few months.

Reviewed by: 

As Queen Elizabeth I’s 50-year reign over England entered its latter years, a controversial and gifted playwright entered the theater scene and dove head first into the social causes, psychological

Reviewed by: 

“Horror fiction is alive and well, and Paperbacks from Hell is a grand, affectionate, and informative celebration of the genre.”

Reviewed by: 

“highly entertaining and easy to read. . . . despite its length and sheer poundage in paperback is unputdownable. Bravo . . .”

Reviewed by: 

Ever since it was first published in England in 1847 and in the U.S. in 1848, Jane Eyre has been a literary phenomenon, widely read, profoundly influential, and lovingly imitated.

Reviewed by: 

Andrew Dickson is former arts editor at the Guardian, was at the 2012 Shakespeare festival at the Globe Theater in London highlighted by productions of Shakespeare from all over the world

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

If you have an interest in writing and haven’t gone the route of a Master of Fine Arts, read this book.

Reviewed by: 

The well-known author and biographer, Claire Harman, has given us what could be the definitive biography on Charlotte Brontë (1816–1855).

Reviewed by: 

For Jennifer Birkett, Emeritus Professor of French Studies at the University of Birmingham, Samuel Beckett thought “life was a matter of doing time, while writing was a way of undoing it.” 

Reviewed by: 

Mesmerizing and at times mesmerizingly confusing, Harold Bloom’s new opus, The Daemon Knows: Literary Greatness and the American Sublime, is (but only fractionally) this: A mix of the tend

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Parks’ essays examine the choice international writers face.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

a pleasure to read.

Pages