LGBTQ

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Born in the forties and raised an only child in a middle class family in the fifties’ South, Peggy Caserta grew up in an era in which girls received little education and then worked only until they

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We tend to view childhood through rose-colored glasses, evoking an age of innocence and carefree days anchored by loving and protective families in safe and supportive Leave It to Beaver n

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“a social history, scrutinizing the complex social, racial, and sexual history of a city already known for its social, racial, and sexual anomalies . . .”

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“The Boys of Fairy Town is an informative, entertaining, and often eye-opening book that examines the complexity of male queer culture in one of the nation’s most

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“an unsettling resonance that more triumphantly framed survivor stories rarely achieve.”

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“Duberman’s book is deliberately uncomfortable. It raises difficult questions, and does not provide easy answers.”

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“Tinderbox is a reminder that this history can never be forgotten as the backlash against GLBTQ civil rights are once again under attack.”

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Michelle Tea’s publisher, the Feminist Press, calls her a “queer countercultural icon.” She is that, indeed, and has been an icon in the queer world for decades.

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“This book is a catalyst for a thoughtful discussion of . . . complicated and challenging issues.”

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Why is it that academicians insist on writing books in an obtuse and opaque manner? Are academics incapable of writing in a clear, straightforward manner?

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Halberstam begins his “quirky” text with a tribute to David Bowie, whose gendered appearance “part man, part woman, part space alien” inspires his reflections on the relationship between sex, gende

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“Sooner or later, we have to venture beyond our biological family to find our logical one, the one that actually makes sense for us.

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Historians, like archeologists, play an invaluable role uncovering all-but-forgotten people of the past, thus helping provide a better picture of the present.

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“Readers will shout and stomp; snort and yell, while reading Nasty Women. It is the perfect weapon for dispensing gut-ripping vitriol in the privacy of your own mind.”

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"The big surprise about David Sedaris’s new book, Theft by Finding: Diaries (1977–2002), is how very good it is."

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“This book falls short of providing practical and achievable suggestions for achieving the goal of protecting people from sex classification based discrimination.”

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“This book falls short of providing practical and achievable suggestions for achieving the goal of protecting people from sex classification based discrimination.”

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This timely publication addresses much of the misinformation about the trans community that persists despite increasing media coverage both popular and serious.

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The focus of this book is “the use of employment law and practices in the United States to exclude gay people from public social spaces.” The book focuses on discrimination in the U.S.

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Last year, journalist Michelangelo Signorile’s It’s Not Over detailed how the right wing and some religious groups were working feverishly with antigay organizations to attack any pro-gay

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“Overall the book achieves its aim most efficiently and pleasurably, serving as an introduction to the academic world of Queer Theory . . .”

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This is an important book on an important subject, but not for the faint-hearted in its very detailed treatment of the ebb and flow of citizenship recognition and rights for LGBT individuals in Ame

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Lillian Faderman received the 2016 Anisfield-Wolf Book award for The Gay Revolution. That alone makes this book worth reading.

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