Historical Fiction

Reviewed by: 

“the characters are complex, three-dimensional, and not always likable people, struggling with engrossing dilemma—the fixings of a good novel.”

Reviewed by: 

Anyone seeking respite from serious matters, or excitements of their own, would do well to grab a copy of British writer CJ Wray’s novel, The Excitements. 

Reviewed by: 

For the history lesson alone, Cold Victory is memorable.”

Reviewed by: 

It is a cold February night in 1942. Dancers are swaying to the music at London’s Feldman’s Swing Club.

Reviewed by: 

The Derelict Light, environmental journalist Mike Stark’s first novel, is a character study of Astoria, Oregon, a small, dreary town on the Columbia River just miles from the Pacific Ocean

Reviewed by: 

“Penney has written a well-researched, fascinating historical novel of a time in the history of Paris that English-speaking readers are not very aware of . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“After what seemed an endless fourteen-day journey across the wave-tossed Atlantic in the belly of a filthy, overcrowded steamship . . . fifteen-year-old Rivkah Milmanovitch . . .

Reviewed by: 

“In a business in which feminine beauty is what they’re selling, both Arden and Rubenstein eschewed those qualities society deemed feminine.”

Reviewed by: 

“The mistreatment of Chinese immigrants has been swept under the rug of the myths of the Old West and American history.”

Reviewed by: 

The House of Doors is a fascinating, beautiful book.

Reviewed by: 

With a title implying vastness, and a subtitle specifying three subjects broad enough for each to fill its own book, readers can expect an epic novel with them all melded together.

Reviewed by: 

“As in every Penrose novel, the solution to these linked crimes is generated through the loyalty and insight of intelligent and caring friends.”

Reviewed by: 

“This epic quest with its strands of love and loss frames an American exploration of family, grief, honor, and deep humanity in an unforgettable fashion.”

Reviewed by: 

“He found himself lying under white sheets with very little idea of how he had gotten there. It was the morning he woke up . . . He seemed to have been there for some time.”  

Reviewed by: 

This richly textured narrative whipsaws the reader between the 14th and 21st centuries.

Reviewed by: 

graceful and eloquent and compelling.”

Reviewed by: 

"Donoghue has created a vivid world here, the confined lives of ambitious girls, some manipulative, some kind, but all keenly aware of the social strata containing them. . . .

Reviewed by: 

“The sense of place and the dynamics of a small town of that era are convincing and give us a glimpse of the history and culture of that period in South America.”

Reviewed by: 

Richard Kluger’s Hamlet’s Children is a fantastic piece of historical fiction that is so believable one would think that the story is actually true. The author’s style is unique.

Reviewed by: 

A beautiful woman with a sordid past, Arabella Yarrington began her ascent into the highest levels of society from the depths of a ramshackle cabin in Alabama where she lived with her widowed mothe

Reviewed by: 

“Berta’s murder, the public display of her mutilated body all this was meant to be a deterrent.” And it was! Yes, the people in and around the Tuscan hills were truly mortified.

Reviewed by: 

The Girl from the Papers is a well-told story and well written.”

Reviewed by: 

Alma Rosé, an Austrian violinist of Jewish descent, was a virtuoso violinist, playing throughout Europe with famous orchestras and symphonies. The famous composer Gustav Mahler was her uncle.

Reviewed by: 

“Anjum Hasan, a gifted writer who deserves wider recognition, deftly highlights the power of ideas and the peril of majoritarianism.”

Pages