Families

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It might be hard to imagine that a novel about a Senegalese immigrant living in the countryside of Flanders would have anything to say about our current world crisis over immigration but that’s whe

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Cassie Hanwell once wanted to be a physician, but now finds her niche working as an EMT/firefighter.

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“a subtle novel that pulls you into the minutae of the story. The delight is in the detail.

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“David Szalay’s art accomplishes what arithmetic can’t: The whole adds up to more than its individual components, and in sum his Turbulence is a tour de force.”

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Sixteen-year-old Brin Collins believes her life is falling apart. It all began when Delia, her mother got pregnant.

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Many people go through the empty-nest syndrome when their children leave home. Some look forward to their newfound freedom, but some become depressed.

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The Ghost Clause by Howard Norman is a novel about intellectuals. Or rather, it’s a novel about marriage and American village life as seen through intellectual eyes.

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Henry Maxwell, the main character in Stewart O’Nan’s latest novel, Henry Himself, is an expert moderator at fraught family dinners.

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In The Dream Daughter, time travel, the Vietnam War, North Carolina, and the modern digital world are all backdrop for a mother’s connection with and devotion to her unborn child.

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“Kwon wraps up the mystery of Sylvie’s disappearance at the end, but the discovery of how these characters change throughout the novel may be the more important journey.”

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“Weir’s presentation of Anna is interesting, intense, filled with myriad crises, and a fast read.”

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“My Life as a Rat is a quiet, contemplative tour-de-force.”

 

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“What is most remarkable about Mostly Dead Things is that, despite the mishaps and travails of the Morton family, the novel is ultimately both highly entertaining and inspiring, as

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This book, final volume of a trilogy, has been hailed as “hilarious” and “comedic” and similar terms.

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“a satisfying summer read.”

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If you’ve read Mary Miller’s captivating debut, The Last Days of California—an eccentrically peopled coming-of-age tale—you might be expecting something similar from her second novel,

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“This novel’s greatest strength is the simplicity of its message: two boys who grew up in such different worlds playing soccer in the backyard and sneaking off to eat raspas offer us a grea

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Many little girls love parties, and in 1988 Zoe O'Flaherty, age five, is about to enter kindergarten.

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Katie Ellis, who is divorcing her cheating husband Eric, is shocked when he brings his "friend" to the lawyer's office.

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Feel-good stories abound, but this one offers a fresh and creative context: crop circles.

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Divorce attorney Leigh Huyett believed she had it all: a loving second husband, a mixed family consisting of her 20-year-old twin sons and her delightful 14-year-old daughter Chrissy.

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“In American Duchess the reader is afforded a remarkable and realistic portrait of a life well-lived in spite of and often in opposition to societal expectations.

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The first page of When All Is Said is an advertisement from a Thomas Dollard for an “Edward VIII Gold Sovereign Coin, 1936. Willing to pay top price.”

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Englander finds fascinating ways to explore another of his great recurring themes: the points at which modernity and tradition may fruitfully, if uncomfortably—and always

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“The Quintland Sisters transports the reader to another time period . . .

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