Families

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What would you do if you were in a plane crash, but managed to survive? Being so close to death, it's only logical anyone would reassess their life.

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“The Boy in the Field is a literary mystery novel. . . . Just not the kind that focuses on what happens on a patch of land, a highway, or even a country.

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Beneficence, Meredith Hall’s first novel, appears 13 years after her prize-winning memoir Without a Map.

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“deeply evocative, eminently readable . . .”

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a great swashbuckler and ultimately a good read.”

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“‘Murder him. . . . I can’t see any other way out,’ counsels Abbé Pierre as he hands Yvonne the lethal drug. . . . ‘You’ll grieve. You’ll mourn.

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Perhaps any novel that takes place largely in the minds of octogenarians and an arguably distraught—possibly disturbed—single mother may seem to wander over wide psychic territory.

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“a haunting portrait of a nation slowly collapsing . . .”

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Willa and Harper Lakey are as close as two sisters could be, even considering their dissimilar personalities.

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“For a perfect summer read, look no further. You’re not likely to find more beautiful, more distinctive prose anywhere.”

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“Connie Schultz has a reputation for writing about everyday people and their lives.

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“A riveting, inventive, quietly disconcerting page-turner.”

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It is the summer of 1993 and 23-year-old Mallory Blessing is desperate to get away from her Baltimore childhood home.

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“Focusing on estrangement, abuse, forgiveness, and a chance for new beginnings, The Bitter and Sweet of Cherry Season is sure to tug at the heartstrings.” 

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Mostly Dead Things is an odd creature: a book widely recommended and popularly listed, but marked by a fundamental discomfort that defies mainstream appeal.

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“If Carlos Manuel Alvarez’s debut novel The Fallen is any indicator, he is a Cuban writer to watch.”

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“My trainer believes in me,” Remington Alabaster tells Serenata, his wife of 32 years. Until now he has been a reliable couch potato, she an equally predictable fitness maven.

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“Meyerson does an admirable job of answering the question she posed to herself, and by the end of the story, ties up all the loose ends that she tossed out to the reader from the beginning.

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How many older women regret not doing things they've wanted to do in life?

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This may be the real gift of this book and its real magic, Susan Petrone’s moving us from indifference to understanding and caring for others and our world, and that’s a v

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Julia Alvarez is a good storyteller, as anyone who has read her most well-known novels, In the Time of the Butterflies, and How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents, knows.

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“eminently readable and emotionally intense.”

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We are all actors in the comedy and drama of our own lives, caught in a story inherited from family, redrawn by fate, and reconstructed by us as we look dizzily backward.

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“a family saga with several twists and turns . . .”

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Weather is a well-crafted, profound, unsettling, and deeply resonant work.”

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