Law

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“For those who have spent the last several years sharpening their knives with Trump in their sights, Untouchable may offer justification, while Trump defenders will likely rail aga

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Anyone familiar with legal analyst Dahlia Lithwick’s prolific writings at Slate.com or in numerous prestigious publications will find her book, Lady Justice, compelling, disturbing, urgent

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“war sometimes does strange things even to those ideals a nation purports to cherish the most.

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This is a fundamental book for understanding one of the most salient issues roiling relations between China, its neighbors to the south and east, and the United States.

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By Hands Now Known makes an authoritative argument for reparations and restitution for the families and communities whose lives were destroyed by Jim Crow crimes, and for whom not

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The author is a scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the former editor of Foreign Policy.

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“A duo of enabling events opened the door to the descent into legal unprofessionalism, starting with a Supreme Court decision that permitted lawyers to advertise, at least on a limited basi

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The spirit of the title hints at the message: A British prosecutor at Nuremberg, Sir Hartley Shawcross, encouraged the judges to imagine that all of humanity stood before them, crying out, “These a

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When Freedom Speaks by Lynn Greenky is an excellent introduction and exploration of the contentious field of First Amendment jurisprudence.

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“Deeply researched and written with authority, Snyder’s book examines virtually every aspect of Frankfurter’s career and, despite its length, remains wonderfully readable and accessible.”

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Bad City, a startling tale of people looking the other way and behaving ever so badly, never lets up.

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American Cartel joins a small shelf of important books, including Dopesick and Empire of Pain, that fully capture the greed and corruption fueling the nation’s d

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“Advocacy for the Magnitsky Act, which would freeze Russian assets abroad, made the author a target for Putin.

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“The author has a specific agenda about gerrymandering in our time, but he makes his points with engaging historical-political storytelling.”

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Manifesting Justice will repay the very determined reader, and there are many shocking moments where the law is revealed to be, to an almost unbelievable extent, an ass.”

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The Most Human Right can be a valuable book for undergraduate students studying human rights in a philosophical context.”

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“Often riveting, well-researched, and utterly convincing, this book sounds a frightening alarm about unreliable expert testimony in the courtroom.”

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It is impossible to enjoy reading the constitution more than through the searing perspective of the brilliant Twainesque humor of Elie Mystal in Allow Me to Retort: A Black Guy’s Guide to the C

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“succeeds in capturing the full story behind a notorious murderer’s brazen quest to avoid the death penalty by any means possible.”

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“This is a fascinating and easy to read survey history that avoids legal jargon and deftly combines history, anthropology, and legal analysis to provide an excellent introduction to why law

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Among the literally thousands of publications whose primary subject is Abraham Lincoln, there have been some previously that have dealt with his presidential relationship relative to the Constituti

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“Justice Deferred offers a needed refresher course for faded memories on the Supreme Court’s unequal history with one of the key issues not only of our day, but on

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“Meticulously researched, and deftly written, The Engagement has all the thrill of a suspense novel and manages to discuss many fine points of legal procedure without ever becoming

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“The author sees more than 200 years of judicial interpretation of fundamental rights as having devolved into a zero sum game, with winners and losers declared by unelected judges, leaving

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“I would like to be remembered as someone who used whatever talent she had to do her work to the very best of her ability.” —Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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