Law

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On Faith is more than just a book about Justice Scalia’s faith and beliefs. It is a book not just for Catholics, Christians, and believers.

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“Although one might think a conservative future will naturally follow from a conservative past, a truism previously betrayed by the likes of Chief Justice Earl Warren, the legacy of the Rob

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“Doing Justice is an essential read for every American who cares about the rule of law and the pursuit of justice in the United States, particularly at a time when

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“Thin Blue Lie fails to convince us that ‘technologies adopted by law enforcement have actually made policing worse . .

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“In The Trial of Lizzie Borden, Robertson displays her writing and researching skills in this piece of creative nonfiction that reads almost as a novel.

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“In documenting this country’s fateful journey from slavery through thwarted Reconstruction to segregation, Luxenberg paints on a broad canvas, elegantly narrating several captivating and s

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“If more and more actors enjoy fiber access, will the Internet be mainly a tool of the rich and powerful or will it level the playing field, an instrument of asymmetric warfare?”

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“after reading her story, you might want to remove the modifiers: Eunice was not just a brilliant African American woman lawyer; she was a brilliant lawyer.”

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Does Donald Trump owe his 2016 election victory to Russian hacking? Since Election Day, many political scientists have answered: “most likely no.” The logic goes like this:

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“General readers, with no initiation in law, will learn quite a bit about racial discrimination, civil rights laws, and how academics grapple with theoretical difficulties underlying race r

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“For those willing to stomach the brutality, In the Name of the Children is a revelation and a testimony to the fact that some individuals cannot be cured.”

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There is a question that is rarely asked or addressed by any constituent of the American criminal justice system.

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“You have the right to remain silent.” So begins the reading of the Miranda Rights. The name stems from Miranda vs. Arizona (1966), a landmark court case that ended when the U.S.

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Why is it that academicians insist on writing books in an obtuse and opaque manner? Are academics incapable of writing in a clear, straightforward manner?

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Lawyers learn the art of writing persuasive briefs to win cases, even when their heart does not support the facts of the case or the governing law.

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In Speak Freely, Keith Whittington, a professor of politics at Princeton University, defends free speech at colleges and universities, bemoaning that ideological activists, from both left

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Usually a work of nonfiction on the topic of a presidential commission is described as scholarly with a dash of dry.

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We are soon going to have a clash between President Donald Trump and international law.

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President Donald Trump watches a lot of television. Tweets from Mr. Trump's account indicate that his viewing habits include a healthy dose of news programming.

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Looking for a good cause for 2018? Something you can do while sitting in your armchair? Something that needs to be done if we are to live in a “clean” planet?

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Since 1989, more than 2,000 people have been acknowledged as innocent victims of wrongful conviction.

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You don’t find many books like this one in our distempered times.

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In September 1983, an intellectually disabled African American teenage boy named Henry McCollum confessed to the brutal rape and murder of an 11-year-old girl.

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Blind Injustice provides great insight into how wrongful convictions happen in a system designed to avoid them.”

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When a juvenile commits a crime, the constituents of the criminal justice system must answer a question: Is the kid a criminal, or is the criminal a kid?

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