Historical

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“Ronald Grigor Suny has written a massive, extensively researched biography of Josef Stalin’s early years—from his childhood days in Gori, Georgia, to the Bolshevik seizure of power in Octo

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What if Jane Austen could write meticulous diplomatic history combined with a social portrait of American and British aristocracy? The product might resemble The Daughters of Yalta by Cath

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In boyhood, enthralled by an old radio recovered from a dump, Darran Anderson accessed “the world of adults . . .

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“Highly readable, A Traitor to His Species ably details the ‘uncomfortable debate about the proper balance between animal rights and human interests . . .’”

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“It took Europe arguably two generations to fully face up to its shameful Holocaust past.

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“new, concise, and highly readable history of the Habsburgs . . .”

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“Abramsky offers a fascinating portrait of the life of this forgotten sports heroine in fluid prose.”

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For novelists, filmmakers, and writers of popular history, Shanghai in the years between the two world wars is irresistible.

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Auschwitz, Buckenwald, Bergen-Belsen: the names are familiar to readers who have taken an interest in the German concentration camps that operated from the mid-1930s until 1945, when Russian soldie

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“Behind every great fortune,” observed the 19th century French novelist Honoré de Balzac, “lies a great crime.”

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Audubon’s Sparrow is a unique book, a biography in poems of John James Audubon’s wife Lucy Bakewell.

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“Barnes is a delightful raconteur, and there’s a good deal of first-person rumination here throughout.

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Achilles in The Odyssey is “lord of all the dead.” Like Achilles, Manuel Mena died young, in battle.

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Mobituaries is droll, ironic, sill

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This book is absolutely essential reading for anyone hoping to understand post-Soviet Russia and America’s role in shaping its trajectories at home and on the world stage.

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"No one needs a background in the Renaissance and its Holy Roman Church to enjoy this epic and fast- paced tale of debauchery, intrigue, politics, and more."

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Barnum: An American Life, an engaging, insightful, and richly researched new biography by American Scholar editor Robert Wilson, chronic

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The Widow Washington represents an engaging, although not a necessarily convincing new portrait of George Washington’s mother, Mary Ball Washington.

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"’While he seethed, the big world seethed around him. War was imminent. He was powerless. He was nobody. Nothing—no money, nor influence, nor status . .

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“The Impeachers: The Trial of Andrew Johnson and the Dream of a Just Nation is not only an important book that reminds us of a historical moment we might have been

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“Hitler’s Death represents a useful contribution to the neverending literature dealing in some way with the life and death of this most despicable of human beings.

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"this modern commentary on the Commentaries also 'lets you see Caesar the man and politician, not just the general he wanted you to see.'"

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The memoir succeeds, with its deceptively quiet descriptions of autumn both in the natural world, and in the season of his and Hiroko’s own lives, in echoing a uniquely Ja

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“a cautionary tale of ambition, service, and the passing down of the mantel of public service from father to son . . .”

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