Nonfiction

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“provid[es] a detailed record of the 1924 Washington Senators and the roles of Clark Griffith, Walter Johnson, and Bucky Harris in fulfilling its destiny.”

Reviewed by: 

Grief Is for People is an eloquent, pensive, and deeply moving paean to a best friend.”

Reviewed by: 

“For those who don't know Spinoza and for those who do, Buruma offers a truly illuminating book. . . .

Reviewed by: 

What makes a successful political revolution? Are revolutions driven from the top down or bottom up?

Reviewed by: 

There are many children’s biographies about Marie Curie, so this one called Determined Dreamer: The Story of Marie Curie, had to bring something new to the table in order to get published.

Reviewed by: 

Adam’s Peak, high above a rain forest in Sri Lanka (the former Ceylon or Serendib), rises 7,559 feet from sea level.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“An interesting aspect raised in the book is the role that adoption agencies . . . play in placing children.

Reviewed by: 

“The subject is handled well by an expert who produces a highly readable and intimate history.”

Reviewed by: 

Few nonfiction books age well, especially those about race in America—the works of W. E. B. Dubois and John Hope Franklin being the most conspicuous exceptions.

Reviewed by: 

Sarah Ditum’s book covers a period that she refers to as the “long aughts,” lasting roughly from Britney Spear’s famous 1998 song of “Baby One More Time,” until March 2013 with the release by Robin

Reviewed by: 

“Golway’s lively and insightful narrative does much to illuminate La Guardia’s enduring impact on New York City and the relevance of his grand and inclusive social vision a century later.”

Reviewed by: 

In her introduction to Divine Might: Goddesses in Greek Myth, Nathalie Haynes reflects on the view explored in her publication, that we humans create gods in our own image (rather than the

Reviewed by: 

Practical Optimism is very solid in its ideas and methods—comprehensive in about every way, . . .”

Reviewed by: 

It is probably fair to say that even the most avid fashionista is not aware that the Kering group—a multinational corporation that owns everything from Gucci to Alexander McQueen to Yves Saint Laur

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Annie Londonderry had never ridden a bike. She was a mother of three and a hard-working salesperson for newspaper ads.

Reviewed by: 

Looking at Mexico / Mexico Looks Back is a slim, bilingual coffee table book highlighting the photography of Janet Sternburg, a woman far better known for her writing.

Reviewed by: 

Despite the horrific racism he’d seen, suffered, and fought against, John Lewis never allowed his heart to be consumed by hate.

Reviewed by: 

“Opanike’s book is small . . . but each page is filled with interesting detail, some humor, and some dark descriptions, proving that small can be as valuable as large.”

Reviewed by: 

“In True Believer, Traub traces not just Hubert Humphrey’s life but the rise and fall of mid-20th century liberalism with all of its courage, promise, triumphs, contradictions, com

Reviewed by: 

“A Murder in Hollywood shines a bright light into the dark crevices of Hollywood at a time when #MeToo wasn’t even something that was dreamed about, much less utte

Reviewed by: 

Author Dan Callahan specializes in big biographies of stars such as Barbara Stanwyck and Vanessa Redgrave. He profiled Alfred Hitchcock, looked at the art of screen acting, and wrote a novel, too.

Reviewed by: 

“This scholarship, written as a clear, engaging narrative, inspires the reader to take the ideas presented in Life After Power to look at other post-presidency lives.”

Reviewed by: 

“A dynamite cultural history account that focuses laser-like on the fraught translation of Edward Albee’s 1962 searing stage play about marriage . . .

Pages