Nonfiction

Reviewed by: 

“Schweizer uses his keen eye for detail to explain the many and varied ways that the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has influenced US elites in ways that benefit China both economically, pol

Reviewed by: 

While it’s not likely that humans will completely stop eating animals, it’s likely and desirable that we’ll eat, exploit, and harm far fewer animals than we do now.

Reviewed by: 

As the book’s subtitle indicates, Camera Man is not a conventional birth-to-death narrative of the life of Buster Keaton.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Emotional Inheritance explodes the myth that what we don’t know can’t hurt us, at least when it comes to family legacies.”

Reviewed by: 

The Navy SEALS are the elite of the elite in the military of the United States. They train for missions according to their acronym: SEa, Air and Land.

Reviewed by: 

“To read Taste Makers: Seven Immigrant Women Who Revolutionized Food in America is to witness a conversation about these women journeys as immigrants, chefs, teachers, and entrepre

Reviewed by: 

“an eminently readable, even compelling collection.”

Reviewed by: 

“‘I dedicate this book to everyone who helped create its contents in any way, including the assholes.’”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“It is not our circumstances that get us worked up, but the judgments we make about them.”

Reviewed by: 

Hummus: A Global History is a must-read for anyone interested in food culture.

Reviewed by: 

“a workmanlike portrait of Chekhov, useful for the general reader curious to learn more about this master of Russian literature . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“Absolutely gripping . . . armchair travel and exploration doesn't get any better than this.”

Reviewed by: 

Al Worden, command module pilot on the Apollo 15 lunar mission, belongs to a unique club, one of only six men who flew to the dark side of the moon, alone and out of contact with any other human be

Reviewed by: 

Lost in the Valley of Death is a disturbing book that leaves you with a sense of wonder and a sense of unease. It’s a book that is not easy to put down.”

Reviewed by: 

“This is an important addition to the library of Holocaust literature, but it should be read with other historical post-war texts that examine the perpetrators of the Holocaust more deeply.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“What Melo does well is to bring into light the human factor at play behind the immigration lures and the need to reform a broken system.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Gellman’s steadfast refusal to psychoanalyze the most complex and confounding president of the 20th century—a tendency most writers are helpless to resist—is both surprising and surprising

Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Modigliani - Picasso: The Primitivist Revolution is the type and quality of a project one would expect to accompany an exhibition that h

Reviewed by: 

If you have ever wondered why many veterans of war find it difficult, if not impossible, to talk about their experiences, this book will help you understand.

Reviewed by: 

“Renehan explains how one of America’s first true detective stories drew ‘national journalistic attention’ but also went remembered by famed writer Nathaniel Hawthorne.”

Reviewed by: 

This book introduces a young child (ages 4–7) to Charles Dickens. It starts with his birth and childhood.

Reviewed by: 

This is an unusual book because, in almost every way, it is a sequel to a documentary film. Without that film, there’d be no book.

Reviewed by: 

“Why do humans make images?” John-Paul Stonard might as well be asking why do humans breathe, eat, walk, or talk. Because we need to? Because we can? Because we do?

Reviewed by: 

In her most recent collection of essays, Siri Hustvedt provides a feminist analysis of a range of materials drawn from her own family life (particularly the intimate relationships with her grandmot

Pages