Nonfiction

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Natalie Baszile first caught a whiff of fame with her novel, Queen Sugar, that was adapted for TV and co-produced by Ava DuVernay and Oprah Winfrey.

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“This is a rich history, much broader than the title hints at. It’s more about women as movers and shakers in a country’s culture than about divas.”

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“The author sees more than 200 years of judicial interpretation of fundamental rights as having devolved into a zero sum game, with winners and losers declared by unelected judges, leaving

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Before the reader even opens Stones of Grand Bazaar: Meváris Jewellery from Istanbul, he or she will have a definite expectation regarding the subject matter.

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“The chapters on spite and freedom, politics and what is sacred to us are an insightful, relevant, and welcome commentary on what to make of our current hate-filled political climate.”

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Our country has been at war for 20 years, and despite several presidents promising to get us out of conflicts in the Middle East, each one has been defeated in his ambitions to date.

”Many will judge that, despite all the emotional chaos, William Feaver has cornered a lion, and that Lucian Freud has earned his place in the pantheon of great post-war realist painters.

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“will appeal to visionaries yearning for an end to man-made divides and the deliberate building of bridges of kindness and compassion.”

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“Students of culinary history will find this a fascinating combination of recipes and historical narrative.

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“A beautiful book with ingeniously engineered pop-up pages.”

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“The poems in Waterbaby are present. They tell the truth and will inspire readers to lust for more.”

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“Historian Robert Lane Fox adds fact and understanding to the general public’s knowledge and misunderstanding of medicine in classical Greece.

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A stunning, trilingual love poem written to the U.S.A. is America My Love, America My Heart.

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Dan Jones has meticulously researched and almost surgically documented Diana’s adult life (pre, during, and post marriage to Prince Charles) by offering the reader a “menu” of what she wore, when s

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As with her four brilliant novels, Rachel Kushner’s The Hard Crowd, 19 essays from the last two decades, takes the reader on a wild ride.

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It’s not surprising that the jacket blurb compares this new memoir to Patti Smith’s Just Kids. Besides being a terrific book, that one sold really well.

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In November 1995, theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking (1942–2018) sold out London’s Royal Albert Hall (capacity: 5,900) for a lecture entitled “Does God Throw Dice in Black Holes?” A physicist ha

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“‘Yes, I was odd, but not on purpose . . . Nor, I now realize, was I the only one.””

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in Philip Roth: The Biography, Blake Bailey provides ample evidence of his understanding of modern American literature and the frailties and achievements of an ar

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“The Invention of Miracles paints a textured portrait of a man driven not by an entrepreneurial desire to invent a product that changed the world but by a passion

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Imagine that sequoias and cedars, lilies and laurels, even daffodils and daisies, and indeed all the plants of our green world formed their own vast and diverse country, one that spanned the Earth,

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Most savvy and informed fashion readers will be ecstatic with the content of The Perfect Imperfection of Golden Goose.

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“an engrossing portrait of the artist, his art, and his incorrigible personality.”

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