Nonfiction

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Why We Fight is a tour de force of superb social science.”

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My depression competed with my mania.

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“a fascinating and compelling story of a tragic hero and the fields on which he lived and played.”

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“Neanderthals belong to a distant past of hundreds of thousands of years but studying them is a rapidly developing race to the future of scientific exploration.

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“an important analysis and catalogue of a genius at work with a smirk on his never-seen face. The aggregate of his art is Banksy’s validation and legacy.

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“Alford tells the remarkable story of spiritualism as it affected the lives of the members of the respective families of Abraham Lincoln and his assassin John Wilkes Booth.”

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“James Horn has put together an incredible lost history of an important figure whose life decided the future of America and all that has entailed since.”

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“Patrick Radden Keefe’s collection Rogues is a tantalizing dirty dozen—enlightening, entertaining, and thought provoking.”

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Fifty-seven-year-old Diana Goetsch, formerly Doug Goetsch, made the decision at 50 to surrender to the transition process and become a full-blooded transgender woman after decades of heartache. 

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Challenges to Darwin’s view of the sexes are no longer a minority sport, though like all challenges to received opinion they have difficulty being heard in the Establishment they wish to rock.

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The pogroms of Russia have long served as the backdrop to bigger stories.

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“Every science classroom would benefit from having a copy of Up Your Nose.

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“Butler offers a fascinating history that includes appraisals of the work of actors most associated with The Method.

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“so important to an understanding of American thought and the landscape that formed it.”

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“Brendan Simms and Steven McGregor in their new gripping account of the battle, The Silver Waterfall, show that while luck played a part in the battle’s outcome, victory a

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If all you know about stewardesses (make that flight attendants) is based on the bestseller Coffee, Tea or Me, a salacious tell-all 1967 memoir by Trudy Baker and Rachel Jones, then you’re

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"In music, impact comes from steady improvement, pruning, intensifying, through intelligence, sensitivity."

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“You learn a lot, change a few long-held assumptions.

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“Michael Gordon provides a masterful combination of strategic analysis, a study of command, and a combat narrative to create a comprehensive and at times disturbing account of the fight aga

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Daddy Issues: Love and Hate in the Time of Patriarchy is brief and refreshing for what it is NOT, a feminist treatise on paternalism and the female dynamic.

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This book updates Bergen’s Trump and his Generals (Penguin, 2019) with a prologue that takes the story through Trump’s activities in the first year of his Big Lie about the election that,

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The ostensible template for these 24 musings on “singlehood” is Helen Gurley Brown’s 1962 cult classic, Sex and the Single Girl.

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“Our forests, like our oceans, are vastly misunderstood and are commonly abused.

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Wired for Love reminds us that love is as natural as a heartbeat, a breath, a brainwave.”

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