Nonfiction

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“In light of recent political upheavals around the globe, it is clear that democracy is an ongoing and open project that is subject to challenge and direct assault.”

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Elizabeth Block has written about fashion with a decidedly unique perspective.

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“a richly researched, carefully thought-out, and complicatedly inclusive history, an antidote to the current black-and-white thinking that’s proving so divisive today.”

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Oscar Wilde: A Life is elegantly written . . . Dense with detail, it draws the reader into Wilde’s milieu.

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“These columns, written between 2008 and 2020, are written mostly with the same elegance, persuasiveness, and lucidity that have marked Will’s long career as one of the nation’s most percep

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The human animal loves puzzles, and it’s all the more enticing if it’s a puzzle that others can’t solve.

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Rebecca Solnit, the author of more than 20 books, might be called an eternal optimist, if not a Pollyanna. Apparently nothing has ever got her down, at least not for long.

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“For readers interested in how the development of weapons really affected warfare at the tactical and operational level, this is a highly readable volume that combines technical details wit

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“Together the author and illustrator have woven a powerful message, truly an anthem that children—and their parents—will want to sing loudly.”

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In her 11th poetry collection, Bestiary Dark, Marianne Boruch goes back to Pliny the Elder, who asked, “The world, is it finite?” The answer is both no and yes.

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Naval aviators fought a long and costly campaign against North Vietnam from 1964–1973, flying missions against what became one of the most sophisticated air defense systems of the Cold War.

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“‘I grew up in an Italian family that, not unusually, put great import on food.’”

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“Perhaps the most important story is Webb’s own, as she shows that we are all imperfect people capable of creating a more perfect world.”

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In Annals, Diane di Prima’s imagination is on fire and her memory is as precise as ice.

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This book is all about high heels, as is evidenced by the title, told by Frank Rispoli via approximately 110 photographs.

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“Nathaniel Philbrick has a genius for writing about pieces of history and intuiting broad themes and lessons therefrom.”

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The tall and thin book, Nano: The Spectacular Science of the Very (Very) Small, draws us in with its warm cover of yellow, red, and teal.

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“The long history (and struggle) behind every jar of fruit preserve makes for a gripping read, and this little book will not disappoint neither culinary historians nor home cooks.”

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“threads of When Women Ruled the World make up a history of women not just as rulers but as women who were rulers. . . .”

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“Besides offering a rich source of information, Ancient Rome: Infographics presents an incredible example of visual intelligence, of how we learn by ‘seeing’ facts

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“. . . Cervantes describes the exploring, the diplomatic activity, the rivalries, the fighting, and the personalities with delicious granularity.”

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“The premise that cognition and consciousness are traits that arise not solely from the brain but also involve the body, or soma (as in the common word ‘somatic’), is not new.”

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In Stone the Saints: Poems of an Igbo Son, Onuoha does not venture far from traditional literary resources to bring into focus the reality of the Igbo people and their role in the

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“show[s] us the panoply of underpinnings (psychological, sociological, philosophical, and biological) that support this fear of the new, the different, and the ‘other.’”

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Paris is a good idea anytime—especially when you have Marin Montagut as your tour guide through a city that defines style, fashion, history, and imagination.

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