Nonfiction

Reviewed by: 

Timothy Brennan begins his intellectual and political biography of Edward Said—the Palestinian American literary critic, gadfly, and largely self-appointed global diplomat—on a somber note.

Reviewed by: 

“Anyone who appreciates historical narrative in which the boundaries of human endurance are examined will wholeheartedly appreciate this book.”

Reviewed by: 

“Given the cherry-picked evidence, faulty logic, and sheer naivete of this book, any reader hoping to understand world affairs should turn elsewhere.”

Reviewed by: 

In February of 1969, Duke University was on the cusp of national prominence, about to eclipse Emory and Vanderbilt as the South’s premier institution of higher learning and preparing what would be

Reviewed by: 

Eleanor Roosevelt was a transformational figure for generations in the US and around the world.

Reviewed by: 

For 50 years he was known around the world as master of suspense, from his 1928 silent The Lodger to 1972’s Frenzy, Alfred Hitchcock continued to mesmerize audiences.

Reviewed by: 

As quietly as snow falling on “every tip of the picket fence that leaned drunkenly toward the road, . . .

Reviewed by: 

“These selected personal notes form chapters that describe Lincoln’s life in private moments.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Tishby tells her small country’s enormous story with wit and passion.

Reviewed by: 

Let’s not call this a review, deal? Who reviews June Jordan? She was the queen of everything.

Reviewed by: 

“tells a compelling story why the classics deserve a new look.

Reviewed by: 

The first thing to say about Elizabeth Blackwell and her younger sister Emily is that they were formidable women.

Reviewed by: 

“a brilliant book, one that lays out several gripping mysteries and reveals how the personal is very much political, all wrapped in a compelling narrative that will keep readers turning the

Reviewed by: 

“sure to find itself on the bookshelves of any self-respecting true crime junkie, and it is the perfect gateway drug for anyone just beginning their journey down the dark and hoary path of

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Bailey can look forward to a great future as a poet.”

Reviewed by: 

Even the most obscure events in history have their own story to tell for posterity’s edification.

Reviewed by: 

“Sylvia Beach, Bryher, Natalie Barney, and Gertrude Stein—all rebelled against outworn art and attitudes.

Reviewed by: 

“illuminating, well-written, and offers sharp insights into fascism’s strong appeal, for some, in times of turbulent change.”

Reviewed by: 

The reviews are in. Vigorous. Exuberant. Boisterous. Energetic. Not the usual words used to describe coming-of-age-poor memoirs such as My Broken Language.

Reviewed by: 

The clichéd assessment “compulsively readable” seems the most appropriate response to Andrew Morton’s 385-page book on the Windsor sisters, Elizabeth and Margaret.

Reviewed by: 

Buses Are a Comin’ offers more than a tribute to the Freedom Riders and other activists who put their lives on the line in the face of segregationist massive resistance and stirre

Jerkins adeptly delivers a timely message as well as a novel replete with symbolism and metaphor.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“a fittingly timely book that fits well into the post Donald Trump era of false narratives, conspiracy theories, and cries of fake news . . .”

Reviewed by: 

Eighty years later World War II continues to provide new stories of bravery and sacrifice, as well as new evidence of the evil of the Nazi regime.

Pages