Nonfiction

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In his memoir, I Was Hitler’s Pilot, Hans Baur provides more insight into his love of flying than he does discussing his role as Hitler’s pilot.

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Ted Gioia's books on jazz, blues, and folk music are both scholarly and entertaining, and his latest volume Music: A Subversive History is perhaps his most ambitious.

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National Review Senior Editor Richard Brookhiser has written a thoughtful and elegant meditation on the American idea of liberty . . .”

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“This is not an easy journey, but neither has the evolution of humans from the savannahs of Africa to the surface of the moon been idyllic.”

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A military memoir filled with dark humor, Clint Emerson’s The Right Kind of Crazy builds a portrait of what it takes to work in special ops for two decades.

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“Simply put, Dan Buettner has written the ultimate manual for longevity.”

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“The Broken Road seeks not only to answer the ‘why’ of George Wallace’s behavior, but also to reconcile his legacy of bigotry and hatred, and subsequent redemption

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“Cahalan’s research is dogged and her narrative riveting, leading us from red herring to clue and back with the dexterity of the best mystery novelists.

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“A prolific writer and award-winning actor, John Lithgow has penned a laugh-out-loud picture of American politics at its worst.

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Secondhand tells an important story about consumerism gone wild, the complex industry that has grown around its detritus, and how we can push back on an entrenched culture of disp

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“Line after line and scene after scene delight the reader with its account of a world gone by but well worth the returning to, if only as a tourist.

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Mr. Know-It-All is an argument for deviance, performance, and shock.”

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This is an incredible monograph that chronicles the rise and family dynamics of one of the most prestigious and internationally known jewelry brands linked to the family that built it “brick by bri

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“offers one of the most well-rounded, entertaining, and creative presentations of Gaugin biographies on the shelves.”

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Joseph Caldwell’s memoir In the Shadow of the Bridge is an intimate remembrance of gay things past, of the great loves of his life, and New York’s LGBTQ community, before Stonewall and dur

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From the moment you begin to read Dior: Moments of Joy you become aware that this monograph is not like most within the genre.

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This monograph is not a glossy coffee table chronicle of the works of Richard Avedon’s oeuvre of this period.

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“This major new work on the first aerial campaign of the jet age is highly readable revisionist history.”

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Neal Katyal makes an unimpeachable case, concise but comprehensive, for impeachment.  The author of Impeach knows the law and how to practice it.

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“Highway of Tears is a riveting account of the terror visited on a community when their children go missing, made even more horrific by helplessness felt when poli

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User Friendly offers a wild, eye opening ride through the evolution of the psychological perceptions and unfathomable applications of technology.”

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Paula Rego: The Art of Story is an extensive monograph covering the breadth of a 60-year artistic career which, for all intents and purposes, could be summed up in one word: intense.

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“For the love of Notre-Dame, this is the book you want.”

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“Granted that democracy is always a work in progress, if democracy again shines in the United States, its broad appeal can bolster demands for democracy in China.”

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