Nonfiction

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“an exceptional account of the impact of trauma, the struggle for healing, and the very real chance to find freedom.”

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Edward Wong, a diplomatic correspondent for the New York Times, has written a hybrid book that combines family history, a wider examination of China through the ages, snippets of reportage

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Tiger, Tiger is not the first, nor will it most likely be the last, attempt to write the definitive biography of Tiger Woods, arguably the greatest golfer in the history of the game.

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“an exciting, disturbing portrait of Hollywood’s cultural power during its heyday.” 

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“Muir’s ideas on race and religion . . . were far from remarkable and very much congruous with contemporaneous ideological hegemony. What stands out . . .

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“Buckle your seatbelts and look forward to the futuristic ride of your lifetime.”

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We Refuse goes a long way to helping us understand an important part of our national past, slavery, racism and resistance.” 

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“a heartfelt book that will definitely speak to many people who have had to navigate the cracks, fissures, and fault lines between radically different cultures across generations.”

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Music industry executive and cultural ambassador David Junk, and veteran music journalist Fred Bronson, have combined their talents to write a fast-moving, information-rich narrative about the inte

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“a story of astonishing self-indulgence and greed by France’s tiny, privileged nobility at the expense of the subjects of the realm.”

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Here is a book for anyone hoping to learn more about the emergence of female liberation; for any historian anxious to take in another facet of life in one of Europe’s most dazzling cities; and for

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“a genre-expanding noir memoir-detective story, full of drama, intrigue, bizarre characters, even more bizarre behavior, and unexpected twists.”

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This magisterial biography rightly places John Quincy Adams at the forefront of great American statesmen.”

The words “with me” tickled Salman Khan’s imagination when he was naming his new invention, an AI tutor for academic studies.

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“That same summer, Sheila Rohan traveled by bus, ferry, and two different subway lines to get from Staten Island to Harlem,” writes author Karen Valby about these pioneering Black ballerinas and th

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White people have a lot to learn about people of color, both in history and today. This book might very well help some of us understand.”

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Kara Loewentheil hosts a very successful podcast UNF*CK YOUR BRAIN: Feminist Self-Help for Everyone, and in her new book draws on cognitive psychology, feminist theory, and years of experience as “

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The Iraq War is only beginning to receive its due historical reckoning, with many new volumes uncovering the background of the 2003 invasion and discussing the biased, chaotic and often dysfunction

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The subtitle of Write like a Man is Jewish Masculinity and the New York Intellectuals, the implication being that the (mostly) Jewish intellectuals who dominated the mid-century A

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“Night Flyer reminds readers that even the most unlikely of persons can impact their worlds, for good or evil.

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As much as 76-year-old Francine Prose is saying, there always seems to be so much more she is not telling us.

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“Paul McCartney, put it well. He said she had ‘the best female voice in the world, melodic, tuneful, distinctive.’”

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"Avid fans will delight in recognizing where certain elements in the Snicket list originated."

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Maher’s goal is to open our eyes, expand our minds, and move us past identity politics and toward making wiser choices for our country and world.

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