Nonfiction

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“If collecting ‘street photography’ is your passion, this book will become a cornerstone of your collection and will be the measure of all other works you own.”

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“Staged as they are, in moments of near-communication, the images seem always on the verge of sound, even when they were captured in Victorian silence.”

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[That] The Presidents makes a fast, engrossing read comes as no surprise . . . It works on so many levels including for a general audience.”

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“This journal is my life, my companion and my confidant. Without it, I would be lost. In it, I pour out all my heart’s feelings, until I feel somewhat relieved.

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“Add Dreyer’s English to The Elements of Style and a select few books no writer should be without.

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“Swift: New and Selected Poems reads like a poetic encyclopedia, a fusion of art, science, mathematics.

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The memoir succeeds, with its deceptively quiet descriptions of autumn both in the natural world, and in the season of his and Hiroko’s own lives, in echoing a uniquely Ja

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“A book that should not be hidden but proudly displayed and offered to others.”

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“Hitler’s Last Plot is certainly among the first to bring together a more detailed look at how the Nazis tried to use these people as a means of mitigating or avoi

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“a cautionary tale of ambition, service, and the passing down of the mantel of public service from father to son . . .”

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If you are expecting some sort of Sex and the City compilation of stories featuring brands like Blahnik and Louboutin, well then, this is not a book for you.

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What if we took seriously the form of thinking that we find in tragedy, and the experience of partial agency, limited autonomy, deep traumatic affect, agnostic conflict, g

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“The techniques, key steps, and commentary that Wolf provides in each chapter as he blends music and meditation together will prove beneficial to the reader who wants to cross these bridges

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Leadership and the Rise of Great Powers gives morality an explanatory role. In international politics “moral actions help [a rising power] to establish a degree of credibility . . .

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"Degas: Painter of Ballerinas is an enchanting book that would make a perfect gift for aspiring artists and dancers."

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“A good piece of writing should be brief and concise, but it must also be worthy.”

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"In Women's War, Stephanie McCurry writes from a perspective of women as equally important in all social issues of the American Civil War."

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“If James Olson’s intention is to encourage American intelligence institutions to press the reset button and regain control of the counterintelligence battle through new methods and a refre

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The historiography of prisoner of war (POW) publications generally takes the Western or Allied perspective.

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By usual publishing standards, this new edition of a 1971 book shouldn’t exist and shouldn’t be relevant today.

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“As literary genres go, poetry is among the most democratic and fluid, with sub-genres to accommodate the intentional breaking of rules, the joyous flouting of form, and the expression of a

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“David Powell is quickly becoming a noted historian on the war, with multiple volumes on the Chickamauga and Atlanta Campaigns.”

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“I was born homosexual. Very early in my childhood, I remember lying in bed awake, anxious, calming myself by imagining that I was in the arms of a man—an adult man.”

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“How did a sickly kid from a poor family in Pittsburgh become Andy Warhol, the cultural superstar?”

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“While much is known about the two successful accidentals, Roosevelt and Truman, and the partially-successful Lyndon, the latter Johnson, much of the book’s treasure lies in earlier, lesser

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