Nonfiction

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“FDR, as Gerhardt shows, was certainly one of the most consequential presidents in our nation’s history, but consequential and greatness are not the same thing.”

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This is a book about a global shock that took Washington and most of Europe by surprise: the sharp revival of superpower conflict.

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Cookbooks like these are often travelogues as well, and Guinness does a great job tying in the cuisines of the different seaside destinations.”

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“brings together Hoover-style surveillance and Goldman-style anarchism with the force of inevitability [that] reflects both top-notch detective work and consummate crime writing.”

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During World War II, more than 600 United States planes were lost ferrying supplies between India and China.

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“Korda writes that the tragedy of the First World War can best be understood not by reading histories, but rather by reading the poems, letters, diaries, and memoirs of the men who fought i

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By the end of World War II, the U.S. Navy was the foremost maritime power, eclipsing Britain’s Royal Navy. However, at the end of 1942, the U.S.

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If your “to do” list is never ending, set it aside, get cozy on the couch, and read Cal Newport’s Slow Productivity: The Lost Art of Accomplishment Without Burnout.

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“a solid little book perfect for anyone interested in a jump-start introduction to James Barnor.”

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“It takes more than guts to write great poems about shattering truths, chronic pain and trauma, vulnerability in relationships, and regrettable sexual encounters.”

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Do Beatles fans really want to revisit this painful, bitter, divisive time in the life of the band who otherwise gave the world so much joy?”

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“Sometimes nonfiction is even more intriguing than fiction, and Preston certainly knows how to keep readers’ attention while taking them on a journey into the mysteries of the past.”

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“Only to the white man was nature a ‘wilderness’ and only to him was the land ‘infected’ with ‘wild animals’ and ‘savage’ people.”
—Luther Standing Bear

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“Adam Gopnik’s reflections teach us how to free ourselves from the chains of expectations and let happiness find us.”

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“a gift to anyone interested in African American history and African American writing . . .”

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"Some women aspired to become a housewife from an early age and are delighted with the role; others were relegated to it . . ."

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“one of the most captivating books on the market linking fine art with climate change.”

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Bits and Pieces by . . . Whoopi Goldberg . . . is a rare gem among many ho-hum celebrity memoirs."

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Presenting Lee Krasner as a new release is a bit of a misnomer, as it is actually just the paperback edition of the exhibition catalog created for the 2019 show of the artist’s work at the

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“aesthetically embodies the era it is celebrating, and it does it flawlessly.”

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“From a visual perspective, it is one of the loveliest fashion books to come out this year and would be a beloved volume for anyone who loves to look at gorgeous pictures.”

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an important contribution to the current debate on the best way for the United States to maintain its global leadership while avoiding war with its primary challenger.”

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a fascinating collection of case studies of cross-cultural adoption . . .”

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“The Fixer is a fascinating read that is almost like looking in someone’s medicine cabinet—you know you’re not supposed to but curiosity gets the better of you.”

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“When we first arrived in the United States, my father made me dictate everything I could remember about the years while we were apart.” These valuable notes form the basis for Janet Singer Applefi

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