Music

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James Kaplan’s jazz book explores the lives, separately and then together, of three important figures in modern jazz: Miles Davis (trumpet), John Coltrane (saxophone), and Bill Evans (piano).

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To be young, blues-besotted, and touring with Muddy Waters, the great Mississippi-born singer and guitarist who electrified a Delta folk style and, on his own and through disciples like the Rolling

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Author Dan Callahan specializes in big biographies of stars such as Barbara Stanwyck and Vanessa Redgrave. He profiled Alfred Hitchcock, looked at the art of screen acting, and wrote a novel, too.

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“The author calls Billie ‘the consummate performer whose gift was her ability to make a listener experience the emotion she was feeling as she sang a song.’”

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The ability to fill arenas is always there, even in his starkest songs, and when combined with extreme emotional honesty the effect is devastating.

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“a part of the Beatles history that was nearly lost but now is a compelling and important read.”

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“The reader will get an education in the formative years of a rock band, the grotty clubs, the vans, the marginal pay.”

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In her introduction to this memoir, Donna Leon confesses, “I have never planned more than the first step in anything I’ve done.” Perhaps that is why Wandering through Life is a series of s

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Everyone knows the music of Elton John. But some may not know that Elton never writes any lyrics.

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“a worthy part of any Beatles’ fans collection.”

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“Improbably, perhaps, for a work of music criticism, Kick Out the Jams is as revealing a first draft of history from those cumulatively calamitous three-and-a-half decades as you’r

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The relationship between journalist and subject is an ancient one, and the ice is frequently broken with the hoisting of a glass . . . or two.

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“Don’t Call It Hair Metal is a loving paean to a halcyon time in hard-rock history.”

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Does the world need another book on Oscar Hammerstein II? Hugh Fordin’s Getting to Know Him is a solid biography.

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Ever since the music called jazz emerged in the Black and Creole communities of early 20th century New Orleans (as most histories of the music contend), the vast majority of journalists, authors, a

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“The book is a joy to read. You can dip in anywhere and swim about in Dylan’s brain.”

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Folk Music is not a conventional biography, and readers hoping to find in it details of Bob Dylan’s personal life will have to search elsewhere.

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Music memoirs come in many different forms, but Three Pianos by Andrew McMahon is in a small sub-genre: the self-loathing confessional.

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"In music, impact comes from steady improvement, pruning, intensifying, through intelligence, sensitivity."

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“For those of us who care about opera, Don Giovanni Captured is a fascinating book.”

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Even amid all his late-life venting in The Last Days, Geoff Dyer manages to please once again with his artful sentences and close observations.”

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Let’s be honest—to really enjoy Through the Prism, Untold Stories from the Hipgnosis Archive by Aubrey Powell, it would help if you lived through the days of yore when rock album covers we

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“Hong’s memoir is as perfect in tone and pitch as a memoir can be.”

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