Narrative Nonfiction

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“The Shooter at Midnight offers a deep look into the criminal justice system, with all its warts, and reveals that the system is only as good as the people who ope

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“Korda writes that the tragedy of the First World War can best be understood not by reading histories, but rather by reading the poems, letters, diaries, and memoirs of the men who fought i

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“Sometimes nonfiction is even more intriguing than fiction, and Preston certainly knows how to keep readers’ attention while taking them on a journey into the mysteries of the past.”

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“Kalayjian keeps suspense in his entertaining story in telling what might have otherwise been a dry history.”

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“The author’s conclusions on the long-term effect of the intervention on Russia’s current internal political and foreign policy viewpoint is fascinating.”

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“This somewhat tongue-in-cheek narrative will captivate even the skeptics, directing their gaze upward at night.” 

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“Southon tells the story of the Roman Republic and Empire from beginning to end ‘as told through women.’ The author’s history is that of a ‘bigger, richer—a more realistic empire.’”

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“Agincourt occurred as the combatant kingdoms of England and France each ‘dissolved into on-and-off civil war.’ Livingston brings that world to life and the amazing characters of that incre

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While Idaho Slept is consistently absorbing, if frustrating in its lack of a conclusion.

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“Lipsky’s dizzying no-brakes account of the progression to climate consensus—and of the dogged deniers-for-hire who have attacked it with relentless, reckless abandon—proves engaging and en

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“Were it not for the horrors visited on Germany’s European neighbors, as well as on many of its own citizens, by the Nazis, one might almost feel a twinge of sympathy for the common German.

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Reading the Glass is a deeply engaging, eloquent, and colorful account of a captain's life at sea.”

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“Meltzer and Mensch, in The Nazi Conspiracy: The Secret Plot to Kill Roosevelt, Stalin, and Churchill, give history a sheen of drama that it deserves while leaving the reader much

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McInerny’s greatest gift is knowing the exact ingredients that make learning about oneself seem so effortless and hopeful.”

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During WWII the Germans had about 1,000 prisoner of war camps, holding 170,000 British military alone. The number of stories that could be told is enormous.

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“This is a remarkable little book with a poignant political and social message that should be read by everyone who cares about this country.”

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While recovering from a serious stroke in 1995, British author, critic, and editor Robert McCrum found that the only words that made sense to him were bits of Shakespeare.

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The human animal loves puzzles, and it’s all the more enticing if it’s a puzzle that others can’t solve.

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“a story of the famous Daniel Boone that stands on just its facts, and yet the storytelling has the same quality that has made Pearl’s historical fiction so popular.”

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“Well-written, unexpectedly engaging, and perhaps a bit overlong, After Cooling is a knockout debut by a gifted writer.”

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“Even if he is acquitted, Springora has managed to exact some revenge by capturing G, and all of his terrible behavior, forever in these erudite, incriminating pages.”

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“Ash’s gift for observation and love of people make this first book memorable.”

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“Becoming familiar with the Elizabethan language is not easy, but Edmondson and Wells have taken it to a new level with their detail and final explanations.”

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