Rock

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Let’s be honest—to really enjoy Through the Prism, Untold Stories from the Hipgnosis Archive by Aubrey Powell, it would help if you lived through the days of yore when rock album covers we

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“This revealing, nicely crafted account of rock performers from Bill Haley and His Comets to Pink Floyd will appeal greatly to nostalgic rock fans.”

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Michael Oberman was the music columnist at the daily Washington Star, taking over from his older brother, Ron, from February 1967 to March 1973.

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Philip Norman has tackled some interesting luminaries of the golden age of rock and roll.

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“The Beatles’ legend only grows in stature every year until now it is one of the best-known stories in entertainment history. Anything that remotely touches them is gold.”

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The History of Rock & Roll, Volume 2 delivers more than its share of amusing and revelatory anecdotal glories, while still adhering to its mission statement of identifying ess

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“‘I’d allowed myself to get to the stage where I shaved and wiped my arse and paid other people to do everything else for me. I had no idea how to work a washing machine.’”

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"There was a feeling of immersion into a vastness of humanity, of what seemed to some the beginning of a new age."

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“Renowned producer Mark Howard’s Listen Up! splits the difference between celebrity insights and tech-head talk, offering up candid but affectionate portraits of some of rock’s mos

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“As a biography of a towering musical figure, Serving the Servant is a fascinating read for anybody with even a passing interest in Nirvana.

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“And you know what I say to people who ask, ‘What do you do when all the odds are against you?’ I say, ‘You keep going. You just don’t stop.’”

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Tom Smucker loves the Beach Boys, though he’s not in love with them right now.

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Does the world need another book about The Beatles?

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“Fare Thee Well is a passionate and well-written exposé of the behind the scenes action of one of rock and roll’s most iconic bands . . .”

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In one of the early chapters of this handsome book—as visual and colorful as a magical mystery tour—the authors have a double-page spread titled “Before the Beatles.” It details all the different b

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Gold Dust Woman, the unauthorized biography of pop music legend Stevie Nicks, can be read two ways.

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Generally, books about the Beatles can be divided into two groups, either the all-encompassing history of the band (Tune In by Mark Lewisohn is of course the best example but far from the

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Unsurprisingly, there have been numerous collections of photographs and thousands of words published about Led Zeppelin.

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The journalist, biographer, and Rolling Stone contributing editor Rob Sheffield calls David Bowie a lot of names: tramp, vagabond, and “the most alien of rock artists” to name a few.

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Writing an all-encompassing book about the life of Paul McCartney is akin to writing the definitive biography of Jesus Christ.

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“. . . with More Room in a Broken Heart, we hear the ballad of Carly, sung long and sultry, in a voice as crisp as a winter’s night. . . .

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Not Dead & Not for Sale tells the tale of false starts and unfinished business—the heartbreak of true genius both realized and wasted and the ongoing battle against indelible demons.

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Books should be an adventure. They should either tell stories that pull us in and keep us reading, or they should teach us unique and marvelous feats.

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The inside cover flap of Life, the much-anticipated memoir by Keith Richards, carries a note, in Richards’ handwriting: “This is the Life.

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When they literally were “just kids,” Patti Smith, poet and rock star, and Robert Mapplethorpe, photographer and sexual provocateur, showed signs of the artists they would eventually become.