Current/Public Affairs & Events

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In Algorithms of Oppression, Safiya Umoja Noble clearly explains how search engines, used by billions daily, are not an innocent, neutral vehicle by which to search for information.

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In late August 1949, the Soviet Union detonated an atomic bomb in northeast Kazakhstan. In an instant, America’s nuclear monopoly was gone and a new element was added to the Cold War.

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“This is not a must-read for those involved in the criminal justice system or those interested in criminal justice reform.

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“The only thing worse than reading this chilling book is not reading it and thereby failing to fully grasp the depth and degree of America’s descent into madness as it lurches chaotically t

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Laura Wides-Muñoz’s book The Making of a Dream: How a Group of Young Undocumented Immigrants Helped Change What It Means to Be American is out just weeks before a reported 800,000 Dreamers

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This beautiful and horrifying memoir should be required reading by anyone who feels that immigration is the nation’s number one issue right now.

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Guatemala, a small post-colonial state that is not so post.

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President Donald Trump watches a lot of television. Tweets from Mr. Trump's account indicate that his viewing habits include a healthy dose of news programming.

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“a uniquely valuable addition to the scholarship on prison education.”

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“a brilliantly crafted discussion of the limits imposed by our natural reserves, combining historical analysis, economic development and political decision making.”

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“a brilliant and indispensable intervention from the socialist left on the real historical, class, and sociopolitical forces at play beneath the national political freak show that is the ne

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“Paul Le Blanc’s October Song reminds readers just how difficult it is to make a revolution, especially one that failed.”

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“David Cay Johnston is truly Prometheus bound in this sickening reveal of the Trump Administration.”

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“filled with impressive historical research and analysis. . . . profound in its insights, and its conclusions are shocking.”

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“In the end, something just doesn't smell right about this industry.”

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Playing with Fire: The 1968 Election and the Transformation of American Politics is an important and informative book that becomes more and more amazing as it progresses.

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George Grundy has done us all a great service: he’s written a definitive and expansive book about the events of 9/11 and its aftermath.

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Among the many myths that the United States government seems to enjoy perpetrating on its citizens is one of the military and civilian branches of government working together in harmony for the goo

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“Gordon argues that the Klan represents how some of the most primitive political passions are rooted in fear and hatred of otherness—and a willingness to exploit these sentiments for purpos

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Ta-Nehisi Coates writes with a sound mind and a broken heart, with great power and confessed pain, of America’s relationship to African Americans, of African Americans’ struggle to succeed against

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Whether one is pro- or anti-Russia, or supports or disdains Putin, this book will be a fascinating read.”

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“brilliant, indispensable, and highly accessible . . . examination of the inner undemocratic workings of a U.S.

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Anna Feigenbaum’s Tear Gas: From the Battlefields of WWI to the Streets of Today is a poignant inquiry into the relationship between a corporate-capitalist system of governing and its implic

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“I didn’t read her book. All those reviews . . .” said a 60-something man.

“I never liked her. She’s too pompous,” said a middle-aged woman.

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