Current/Public Affairs & Events

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“A single cow can deposit over a ton of waste on the ground every month with a high percentage of that waste seeping into surface water.

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Nelson Mandela wrote hundreds of letters from August 5, 1962, until February 11, 1990. Prison Letters is a selection.

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In Pain is a fascinating and engrossing read for anybody who aspires to be an educated consumer of healthcare.

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The communes of the ’70s were “weird, wacky and mostly dysfunctional.” So said the Guardian Weekly about Christiania, a Copenhagen military barracks claimed by “seekers of peace” in 1971.

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The anthology Considering Class: Theory, Culture and the Media in the 21st Century, provides invaluable perspectives on the working class at this critical historical time.

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“This is a book rich in detail. Its tone is neutral. It doesn’t give the impression that the author wishes to see the CIA abolished, merely controlled.”

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“Surrogate Warfare is a well-researched and thorough study of surrogate warfare.

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“Read this book to learn which global companies are treating their contributing workers well and how to do business with them.”

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“Professor Sands musters abundant historical evidence to make her principal points, particularly in laying out the enduring tension between foundation and separation paradigms.”

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“Polchin has collected innumerable long-lost newspaper stories of anonymous sex crimes involving gay men and, through careful analysis, given them historical and political

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“an effective attempt to inform and enlighten readers on a topic of immense importance.

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“this engaging, well-written book is must reading for anyone who thinks climate change is just about the weather.”

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“In The Guarded Gate, Okrent shows tremendous insight but also tremendous restraint, letting the alarming rise of racist eugenics unfold in its own time, and painstakingly document

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“While Harriett Tubman had her underground railroad, Margaret Culbertson and her successor Donaldina Cameron, daughter of a Scottish sheep farmer, had their Presbyterian Mission House at 92

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This is a serious and engaging book about a serious business—learning as much as possible about an adversary through HUMINT—intelligence gathered covertly by human agents.

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“This book will be a hard pill to swallow for many in the United States and the West. It raises uncomfortable moral dilemmas and exposes Western weaknesses. . . .”

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Valerie Jarrett of Chicago was described by the New York Times as “the ultimate Obama Insider.”

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The rise of Barack Obama to the office of the presidency in 2008 heralded, to the talking heads whose pronouncements much of the populace uses to form its opinions, the final indication that racism

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“If you want to be abreast of the big issues that the electorate is focusing on in the current election no book has more authority than this one by Alyssa Ayres, a senior fellow of the Coun

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“Trying to divine and react to an assertive China’s intentions and capabilities will be the critical national security challenge for the U.S. this century. . . .

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Leadership and the Rise of Great Powers gives morality an explanatory role. In international politics “moral actions help [a rising power] to establish a degree of credibility . . .

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“If James Olson’s intention is to encourage American intelligence institutions to press the reset button and regain control of the counterintelligence battle through new methods and a refre

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By usual publishing standards, this new edition of a 1971 book shouldn’t exist and shouldn’t be relevant today.

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“Is a baby a commodity? Is pregnancy and childbirth work? Is raising a child a job?”  

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Hal Brands and Charles Edsel, distinguished professors with real world experience in the US Department of State, present what they and others see as lessons drawn from the glory and demise of Athen

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