Current/Public Affairs & Events

Reviewed by: 

“Golway’s lively and insightful narrative does much to illuminate La Guardia’s enduring impact on New York City and the relevance of his grand and inclusive social vision a century later.”

Reviewed by: 

a fascinating journey, and the recipes included help connect readers even more with the foods that Lohman chronicles . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“Polyamory prizes commitment, honesty, trust, mutual consent, open communications, and equality among all sexes and sexual orientations.”

Reviewed by: 

Writers who challenge the conventional wisdom about history and current events are usually interesting and provocative; Richard Sakwa . . . is both.”

Reviewed by: 

Predicting Our Climate Future is an ambitious exploration of a critical topic.”

Reviewed by: 

In the shadow of the exponential rise of “big tech” comes journalists like Jeff Horwitz from the Wall Street Journal reporting on it.

Reviewed by: 

in the end, war will be waged by politicians and generals (and admirals) and the troops they command, and military operations will continue to have political implications.

Reviewed by: 

“This is a compelling, well-crafted exploration of a world turned culturally upside down by what might well be characterized as a civil war in which the abnormal becomes normal, and people

Reviewed by: 

“MacDonald’s book gives newcomers a comprehensive overview to a complicated topic . . .”

Reviewed by: 

The Future of Geography is a serious and very readable book important for all people—not just scientists, generals, and politicians—to absorb and contemplate.”

Reviewed by: 

The Dissident: Alexey Navalny is both interesting and depressing—a valuable guide to understanding contemporary Russia, its boss, and a major opponent.”

Reviewed by: 

The legendary foreign policy expert John Mearshiemer has partnered up with the University of Notre Dame’s Sebastian Rosato to write a short, thought provoking but slightly clanky book around a simp

Reviewed by: 

“an important primer for understanding what has changed, what has stayed the same, and what is likely to happen with conflict in the next decade.”

Reviewed by: 

“Although democracy may not inherently be fragile, when its caretakers abandon their duties, fissures can appear. Sometimes it takes a renegade to stand in the gap.”

Reviewed by: 

“At times, people treat me like an opinion-vending machine,” writes Roxane Gray, the academic and author whose following has grown enormously.

Reviewed by: 

While Idaho Slept is consistently absorbing, if frustrating in its lack of a conclusion.

Reviewed by: 

Whether you are a vegan or you love beef—whether you grew up on a farm or have never stepped in manure—if you care about land, air, and water quality, humane treatment of animals, thriving rural co

Reviewed by: 

“Heather Cox Richardson’s Democracy Awakening demonstrates the indispensable role that historians can and should play in times of ongoing crisis."

Reviewed by: 

“a remarkable and fascinating read, made possible by the author’s extraordinary access to royal and official government archives only recently opened to researchers.”

Reviewed by: 

“Without major changes to institutions such as the Electoral College and Supreme Court, the real majority rule will be out of reach.”

Reviewed by: 

“offers readers a deeply affecting, lyrical and often profound journey into the experience of love and loss.”

Reviewed by: 

Fersko avoids polemics or self-righteous posturing, keeping a smart focus on practical realities.

Reviewed by: 

Christopher Miller learned Japanese, wanted to travel to sub-Saharan Africa with the US Peace Corps but ended up being the only American in the eastern Ukrainian city of Bakhmut in 2010.

Pages