Current/Public Affairs & Events

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“an effective attempt to inform and enlighten readers on a topic of immense importance.

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“this engaging, well-written book is must reading for anyone who thinks climate change is just about the weather.”

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“In The Guarded Gate, Okrent shows tremendous insight but also tremendous restraint, letting the alarming rise of racist eugenics unfold in its own time, and painstakingly document

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“This book will be a hard pill to swallow for many in the United States and the West. It raises uncomfortable moral dilemmas and exposes Western weaknesses. . . .”

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“While Harriett Tubman had her underground railroad, Margaret Culbertson and her successor Donaldina Cameron, daughter of a Scottish sheep farmer, had their Presbyterian Mission House at 92

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This is a serious and engaging book about a serious business—learning as much as possible about an adversary through HUMINT—intelligence gathered covertly by human agents.

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Valerie Jarrett of Chicago was described by the New York Times as “the ultimate Obama Insider.”

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The rise of Barack Obama to the office of the presidency in 2008 heralded, to the talking heads whose pronouncements much of the populace uses to form its opinions, the final indication that racism

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“If you want to be abreast of the big issues that the electorate is focusing on in the current election no book has more authority than this one by Alyssa Ayres, a senior fellow of the Coun

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“Trying to divine and react to an assertive China’s intentions and capabilities will be the critical national security challenge for the U.S. this century. . . .

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Leadership and the Rise of Great Powers gives morality an explanatory role. In international politics “moral actions help [a rising power] to establish a degree of credibility . . .

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“If James Olson’s intention is to encourage American intelligence institutions to press the reset button and regain control of the counterintelligence battle through new methods and a refre

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By usual publishing standards, this new edition of a 1971 book shouldn’t exist and shouldn’t be relevant today.

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“Is a baby a commodity? Is pregnancy and childbirth work? Is raising a child a job?”  

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Hal Brands and Charles Edsel, distinguished professors with real world experience in the US Department of State, present what they and others see as lessons drawn from the glory and demise of Athen

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“Thin Blue Lie fails to convince us that ‘technologies adopted by law enforcement have actually made policing worse . .

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In a rather lengthy introduction Orgad justifies her choosing as her study population privileged, educated, heterosexual, mostly middle class, mostly white, full-time stay-at-home mothers in single

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“Marijuana dependency is a real thing, and this book uses big data to highlight the shocking fact that ‘every day in 2014 almost 250 people showed up at emergency rooms all over the United

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Kashmir has been a conflict zone since 1989. Nation-states have the power to nip idealism in the bud. Vested interests play a role in keeping conflict simmering.

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“The night a stone-fisted neo-barbarian would beat her to gashes and aches everlasting.”

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“Higher education in America is being rapidly reshaped under conditions of unprecedented volatility.* The very notion of the university as a public good is under wholesale siege.

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“In documenting this country’s fateful journey from slavery through thwarted Reconstruction to segregation, Luxenberg paints on a broad canvas, elegantly narrating several captivating and s

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“A clarion call for reform of a failed, wasteful, and heartless model of disaster relief which is self-serving rather than at the service of humanity.”

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