Black & African American

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“the narrative has clear writing and solid scholarship that does not promote an agenda, leaving the reader to imagine broader implications and slavery’s legacy.”

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The resilience of the Crafts, their determination not to allow racism to break their spirits, is the human core of their story . . .”

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“Evette Dionne spares readers none of the agony she suffers being a large woman in a small-minded world . . .”

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Ever since the music called jazz emerged in the Black and Creole communities of early 20th century New Orleans (as most histories of the music contend), the vast majority of journalists, authors, a

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My Pinup may be brief, but it is amazingly rich, more a prose poem than a conventional essay. . . . My Pinup is a gem.”

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“Dick Gregory was one of a kind, the genuine article.”

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In his timely and necessary The Third Reconstruction, Peniel Joseph has written a book with the power to engender the same consuming and transforming passion that

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“Throughout the book, O’Rourke mixes positive with negative as he discusses where the country is and how it got here, primarily with his focus on history in Texas.”

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Ancestors and forerunners show up in the annals of American literature more often than readers imagine.

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African Founders is a Promethean work, a truly magisterial and magnificent book of cultural history that extracts from potentially dry demographi

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A sometimes painful read, this revealing deep dive into George Floyd’s life places his tragic story in the broader context of race in America.”

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In 1982, at the age of 38, Alice Walker’s life pivoted dramatically and irrevocably with the publication of The Color Purple, her third published novel that was awarded the Pulitzer Prize

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Caroline Johnson, an artist who met Lincoln said, “Mr. President I believe God has hewn you out of rock, for this great and mighty purpose.

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“The Color of Abolition proves an invaluable addition to abolitionist history, which has grown immeasurably richer in recent years.”

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It is impossible to enjoy reading the constitution more than through the searing perspective of the brilliant Twainesque humor of Elie Mystal in Allow Me to Retort: A Black Guy’s Guide to the C

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“If America was forged and reforged in the South, then it can be healed and reinvented there as well (and perhaps it must be so).”

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“As the United States inches toward the long-overdue appointment of the first Black woman to the Supreme Court, Civil Rights Queen . . . tells a critically important and . . .

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“Will Alexander’s cascade of images, esoteric musings, Egyptology, scientific contemplations, astronomy, biology, historical injustices, and contemporary African politics swirl in this free

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What do you do when the world refuses to look at you, to really see you? When, still, your life is expendable if the smallest excuse for taking it can be conjured?

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“Gayle Jessup White writes a candid and personal memoir that includes finding the legacy of President Thomas Jefferson and the author’s racial self-identity in the process.”

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“Colorization teems with great stories of Black cinematic struggles and triumphs that bring a century of Hollywood outrages and inroads vividly and fearle

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