Civil War (U.S.)

Reviewed by: 

“Ways and Means represents nonfiction writing at its best, using an easy prose to enlighten with thought provoking, sometimes controversial, ideas from the very beginning.”

Reviewed by: 

“This handy little guide helps in choosing which Civil War sites to visit.”

Reviewed by: 

“Despite the many, many books on Abraham Lincoln, books such as this one bring us the closest to the real man.”

Reviewed by: 

“James Oakes in The Crooked Path to Abolition tells how far Lincoln could go on emancipation within the Constitution—but how far was he willing to go?”

Reviewed by: 

Among the literally thousands of publications whose primary subject is Abraham Lincoln, there have been some previously that have dealt with his presidential relationship relative to the Constituti

Reviewed by: 

“To Douglass, Johnson was hardly a ‘Moses,’ not this man who boasted that, while he had owned slaves, at least he had never sold them.

Reviewed by: 

“Wickenden does a brilliant job of weaving all the complicated threads together, telling a compelling story that we thought we knew well. History at its best: personal, pow

Reviewed by: 

“These selected personal notes form chapters that describe Lincoln’s life in private moments.

Reviewed by: 

The Ledger and the Chain emerges as an essential and definitive work to stand alongside Walter Johnson’s Soul by Soul, Edward E.

Reviewed by: 

Human history is replete with secret societies and organizations like the Knights Templar and Freemasons.

Reviewed by: 

“A bloodied and decimated group of men on crutches came out of the War. Jordan’s impressive history tells their story of courage in the face of danger and undeniable hazard.”

Reviewed by: 

“makes the compelling case that secession was a much more politically complicated process than generally understood . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“For students of international conflict and strategic studies, Quagmire in Civil War offers not only a fascinating read on a highly relevant topic, but provides a model for how sta

Reviewed by: 

Every Drop of Blood is a masterful narrative of the day, weaving together a cast of characters and events in a compelling work that reads like ha

Reviewed by: 

“Richardson’s scholarly work puts to an end the fantasy of American exceptionalism.”

Reviewed by: 

“a fascinating account of spies and counter-spies during the Civil War . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“With the word refugee as divisive now as it has ever been, O’Dowd’s book, examining how fresh off the boat migrants fleeing starvation and persecution helped to save the Union, co

Reviewed by: 

"A Fierce Glory offers spectacle over detail to the benefit of understanding."

Reviewed by: 

It has been asked before, regarding topics which have previously received considerable attention from the publishing world: Is it really necessary for another book on this subject?

Reviewed by: 

In New Orleans, a sturdy column once capped by a bronze figure of Confederate General Robert E. Lee reaches into the sky.

Reviewed by: 

J. D. Dickey’s new book Rising in Flames could be subtitled A Politically Correct Guide to Sherman’s March. It is equal parts social history and military history.

Reviewed by: 

Keep the Days tells the histories of these Civil War works as individual lives, social history, and literature, not as chronicles of battles, god

Reviewed by: 

The tragic and sordid story of the relations between European whites and Native Americans should be well known to all, even without knowledge of specific details in which individual tribes are conc

Pages