Personal Memoir

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Ben Barres’ autobiography is a matter-of-fact record of a very unusual life, and was completed shortly before his death from pancreatic cancer in December 2017.  Barbara Barres—as Ben was born in 1

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Back in 2013 Michelle Obama took her anti-childhood obesity campaign to Mississippi. She spoke at an elementary school not far from Jackson.

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The publication in the West of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn’s Gulag Archipelago and his subsequent exile from the Soviet Union occurred during the flowering of détente and America’s abandonment

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“Lisa Brennan-Jobs is a very good writer who has somehow managed to dredge up debilitating memories without feeling sorry for herself. It’s a compelling read.”

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What if a dismembered corpse was discovered underneath your treasured family vacation home? How would you react?

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Wouldn’t young people—and even old people—be interested in the real goings-on during presidential press conferences and world-wide travel?

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“Funny, romantic, utterly charming, Okay Fine Whatever will particularly appeal to people who suffer from anxiety. In other words, everyone.”

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Kara Richardson Whitely’s double-entendre of a title, The Weight of Being, wonderfully captures her physical and emotional life as a person of higher weight.

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“In spite of the tragedy and difficulty of reading about man’s inhumanity to man, this should be required reading for all . . .”

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Did you grow up having stars in your eyes? Hollywood stars more precisely?

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“Told simply and well, Iftin’s story explains the incredible bravery and hope necessary to live in the crosshairs of war and to find a way out.”

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“a voyeuristic journey of discovery that is riveting and unforgettable.”

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Keith Hernandez played first base better than anyone of the late 1970s and ’80s.

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“an entertaining, sad story, and one that will give the reader much to think about.”

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“If you care anything about journalism as it was practiced before the age of the Internet, it’s a must read.”

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Lawyers learn the art of writing persuasive briefs to win cases, even when their heart does not support the facts of the case or the governing law.

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Stephen Kuusisto is well known for his poetry, Letters to Borges (2013), as well as his books of memoir, Planet of the Blind (1998), a New York Times “Notable Book of the

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Rudy’s Rules for Travel, a slim memoir written by Rudy’s wife, Mary Jensen, offers vignettes from the couple’s trips to far flung destinations from Mexico to Bali.

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Before Chef Alon Shaya and his former boss Chef John Besh recently and very publicly dissolved their business partnership, most New Orleans food lovers simply knew Shaya as the Jewish guy who turne

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The crescendo for Duncan Hannah’s Twentieth-Century Boy takes place in February 1976, more than 100 pages before the end, and four years before the legendary 1980 Times Square Show when hi

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Before you even open the book and begin to take this journey, the reader is assured that this will not be Pulitzer or Nobel Prize material.

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“It is hard to imagine a reader who would not be inspired by the momentous life of Heda Margolius depicted in Hitler, Stalin and I.

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“This courageous memoir is a worthy addition to the growing trans canon.”

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