Personal Memoir

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The spirit of the title hints at the message: A British prosecutor at Nuremberg, Sir Hartley Shawcross, encouraged the judges to imagine that all of humanity stood before them, crying out, “These a

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“The last time I saw Ruth, it was for supper.”

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Beverly Lowry is clear: Deer Creek Drive: A Reckoning of Memory and Murder in the Mississippi Delta is not a memoir.

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“Memoir is meant to be an individual story that illuminates the human condition.

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In the winter of 1949 the celebrated French avant-garde artist Jean Cocteau came to New York to give a talk at the screening of his latest film, The Eagle with Two Heads.

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My depression competed with my mania.

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Fifty-seven-year-old Diana Goetsch, formerly Doug Goetsch, made the decision at 50 to surrender to the transition process and become a full-blooded transgender woman after decades of heartache. 

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If all you know about stewardesses (make that flight attendants) is based on the bestseller Coffee, Tea or Me, a salacious tell-all 1967 memoir by Trudy Baker and Rachel Jones, then you’re

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The ostensible template for these 24 musings on “singlehood” is Helen Gurley Brown’s 1962 cult classic, Sex and the Single Girl.

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Wired for Love reminds us that love is as natural as a heartbeat, a breath, a brainwave.”

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Asylum is an eloquent, powerful, sometimes harrowing chronicle of what it means to be a gay man in a violently homophobic country and what it means to be a Black asylum seeker in

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“A must-read that will have readers laughing, crying, and shopping for chickens.”

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“Rainbow’s balance of self-deprecating humor and serious autobiography makes for a great read. Playing with Myself is aptly titled.

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We’ve all encountered the stories of people who experienced childhood trauma, only to have it blight their later lives until a final reckoning.

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Though a serious reader may feel squeamish about reading a memoir of a daughter stumbling upon her father’s secret stash of “porno” books, Let’s Never Talk About This Again is a sweet acco

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“will give health policy makers much to consider about ways to improve care.

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“The power of the written word will never be made more clear.”

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On the cold night of January 8, 2014, 22-year-old Kait Leddy walked onto the Benjamin Franklin Bridge in Philadelphia.

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“Jonathan Alexander’s emphasis on what he envisions to be a unique narrative form detracts from what the book actually is—which is well worth a read.”

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“He is that most American of species, the entirely self–made individual. There is nothing like him, never has been, and never will be.”

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“With enjoyable, au currant language, and a sharp ear for dialogue, Kerbeck’s astounding story is fraught with tension, written in a voice both confident and accessible throughout an inside

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“‘I dedicate this book to everyone who helped create its contents in any way, including the assholes.’”

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In her most recent collection of essays, Siri Hustvedt provides a feminist analysis of a range of materials drawn from her own family life (particularly the intimate relationships with her grandmot

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“Schickel’s prose and her story are brutal even as they are compassionate, raw even as they are elegant, hopeful even as they are tragic.”

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