Personal Memoir

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Black History Month has arrived once again, right on schedule.

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“a master communicator who knows how to employ humor and integrate personal content with macro issues, Orenstein has written an accessible book, one that will resonate with many readers .

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“Evette Dionne spares readers none of the agony she suffers being a large woman in a small-minded world . . .”

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"Skip this book and read one of her more polished works instead."

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“her diary is a reminder that the voices of children from the frontlines of the modern world are seldom heard but always important.”

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The author grew up in France near Lyon, the gastronomic capital of the world. Her parents were so focused on food and each other that she—an only child—felt like an outsider.

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My Pinup may be brief, but it is amazingly rich, more a prose poem than a conventional essay. . . . My Pinup is a gem.”

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“When the sun quits, my heart starts ticking. . . . The night is what we live for.”

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“This kind of self-awareness is a crucial ingredient for any memoir.

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Like many memoirists, R. Barbara Gitenstein’s insightful and deeply personal story germinated as she looked through her life’s rear-view mirror and at the lessons she learned along the way.

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The spirit of the title hints at the message: A British prosecutor at Nuremberg, Sir Hartley Shawcross, encouraged the judges to imagine that all of humanity stood before them, crying out, “These a

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“The last time I saw Ruth, it was for supper.”

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Beverly Lowry is clear: Deer Creek Drive: A Reckoning of Memory and Murder in the Mississippi Delta is not a memoir.

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“Memoir is meant to be an individual story that illuminates the human condition.

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In the winter of 1949 the celebrated French avant-garde artist Jean Cocteau came to New York to give a talk at the screening of his latest film, The Eagle with Two Heads.

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My depression competed with my mania.

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Fifty-seven-year-old Diana Goetsch, formerly Doug Goetsch, made the decision at 50 to surrender to the transition process and become a full-blooded transgender woman after decades of heartache. 

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If all you know about stewardesses (make that flight attendants) is based on the bestseller Coffee, Tea or Me, a salacious tell-all 1967 memoir by Trudy Baker and Rachel Jones, then you’re

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The ostensible template for these 24 musings on “singlehood” is Helen Gurley Brown’s 1962 cult classic, Sex and the Single Girl.

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Wired for Love reminds us that love is as natural as a heartbeat, a breath, a brainwave.”

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Asylum is an eloquent, powerful, sometimes harrowing chronicle of what it means to be a gay man in a violently homophobic country and what it means to be a Black asylum seeker in

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“A must-read that will have readers laughing, crying, and shopping for chickens.”

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“Rainbow’s balance of self-deprecating humor and serious autobiography makes for a great read. Playing with Myself is aptly titled.

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