Personal Memoir

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“Hunter spares no details about any aspect of his life, so that we feel his cautious optimism when he enters yet another rehab or recovery program and crash with him when he inevitably begi

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“‘Yes, I was odd, but not on purpose . . . Nor, I now realize, was I the only one.””

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As with her four brilliant novels, Rachel Kushner’s The Hard Crowd, 19 essays from the last two decades, takes the reader on a wild ride.

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Rudyard Kipling—the Anglo Indian novelist, short story writer, and bard of the British Empire—must have known that it wasn't true when he wrote, "East is East, and West is West, and Never the twain

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The Empathy Diaries should be required reading for men who care about the emotional landscape of women and the health of their own feminine side.”

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Inette Miller has the distance and detachment of a journalist trained to see the big picture—and the heart of a woman who understands what it is like to be “the other.” It is these differing perspe

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This little book is as candid and charming as its cover, and not coincidentally the kind of book its author, Lennie Goodings, likes best.

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“Even if he is acquitted, Springora has managed to exact some revenge by capturing G, and all of his terrible behavior, forever in these erudite, incriminating pages.”

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Sven Birkerts’ book-length critique of Speak, Memory is a meditation on the nature of time, the past, language, literature, and the self.

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“‘I have often said that my songs are my children and that I expect them to support me when I’m old. Well, I am old, and they are!’”

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Balancing and mixing, with rhyme and reason, love and anger, good and bad, memory and the created present, all to tell the story of a life, a memoir unrestrained, devoid o

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Every sentence in this book deserves to be treasured and relished.

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Russia has never had a greater, more devoted patriot than Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn.”

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“Everyone can benefit from learning how a resilient woman deals with the universal experience of losing someone and learning how to keep the person’s memory alive while becoming reattached

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“The pages turn easily, and the story moves quickly from chapter to chapter in this fascinating memoir of a common solider in World War II.”     

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Chasten Buttigieg does have a story to tell and he does it well in his new book, I Have Something to Tell You: A Memoir.

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“‘If I was the sky, Bobbie was the earth. She grounded me. Two years older, she also protected me.’”

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“This book is personal, deeply and bravely thoughtful, and creatively expressed. . . . it can serve as a tool for the politically engaged.”

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“Selling the Farm by Debra Di Blasi is a creative work for those who enjoy poetic prose in a familial memoir.”

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“Apolitical at the time, Wolkoff now acknowledges that ignoring what bad politics does to real people is one of the things that sucked her down the rabbit hole.”

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The title echoes Virginia Woolf’s non-negotiable insistence that a woman writer needs a “room of one’s own,” and at the same time reflects one of the academic detours that Rita Colwell took when bl

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“Humility, dignity, and character—those were Mays’ personal trademarks. He was an exemplary baseball player and is an exemplary citizen.” 

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“Kerri Arsenault’s portrayal of the devastating impact of unregulated capitalism on the lives of poor, mainly dark-skinned people is a serious indictment of the American way.”

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“Read Roker’s new book in chapter chunks or in one sitting, and be assured you’ll be a bit wiser and feel better because of it.”

Author(s):
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“This is not going to be a standard memoir. We’re just hitting the highlights. It’s a series of quick look-ins, revelations. It’s an aperçu of Alex Trebek, human being.”

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