Contemporary

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Helen Oyeyemi’s craft improves with each successive novel.

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Cowboy Graves lacks the wild ambition and gravity of Bolaño’s best work, but it’s still a tasty summation of his talents.”

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What would you do if feeling unwell your doctor reported, "I'm sorry to have to tell you this, Jennifer, but you have a primary glioblastoma in your brain."? 

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“a landmark in South African crime fiction.”

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Life is stagnant for 44-year-old Alice Holtzman.

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“What a pleasure it is! Page after page features passages that beg to be read again, with wonderfully inventive visuals along the way. . . .

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“Readers eagerly await more from a writer whose finger is on the pulse of the 21st century.

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“Dalton has created a page-turning thriller with undertones of contemporaneous, serious, societal, and academic issues.” 

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recommended for readers who prize beautiful prose and story moments that linger.”

In this latest novel by Chang-rae Lee, author of the riveting and sublime A Native Speaker and A Gesture Life, we see Tiller, a slacker-millennial, a college student who has moved

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Following her 2011 debut collection, This Is Not Your City, and her 2019 novel, The Vexations, Caitlin Horrocks returns with a stellar second story collection, Life Among the

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Peter Ibbetz is an old man with old memories, and they haunt his dreams with increasing clarity and repetition.

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Marvelous and painful, truthful and penetrating, this novel, with every page, requires the reader to sense, to live in and cherish the present moment.

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It’s 2016, Mumbai.

“I cannot stop this moving train,” says Sharifa who has returned to the country of her childhood, India, with her husband and their seven-year-old daughter, Zee.

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This book by Nick Hornby is so “woke,” it’s as though the author is writing an opinion piece more than a novel.

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“Word by word, Schwartz chooses her language with a surgeon’s precision. Her craftsmanship is a joy to behold.”

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Save the Last Dance demonstrates how strangers become family with their caring ways and unfailing faith in each other.”

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“this story sends a message of the bygone days, while offering laughter, insight, fear, pain, and a deep and abiding friendship.”

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Can a novel be about a moment? About a group of people, unique and familiar at the same time, living through that moment that doesn’t yet have a name or any one specific date?

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“packed with crucial climate-change information framed in fairly comprehensible terms. . . .

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“Hornsby's vivid description of the Kansas bar would make Hemingway smile.”

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“Why struggle to open a door between us when the whole wall is an illusion?”

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“What does it mean to be secure? And from whom, or from what? . . . We are all in danger, and all bound to protect one another whether it’s in our job description or not.”

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It is the end of August and Norah Ramsey, a single mom is raising her 15-year-old daughter, Violet in Raleigh, North Carolina. Norah, who is estranged from her mother Polly, hopes to make a better

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With everything going on in our world these days, chances are you’ve not thought much about the many difficult issues surrounding adoption.

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