Contemporary

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“packed with crucial climate-change information framed in fairly comprehensible terms. . . .

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“Hornsby's vivid description of the Kansas bar would make Hemingway smile.”

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“Why struggle to open a door between us when the whole wall is an illusion?”

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“What does it mean to be secure? And from whom, or from what? . . . We are all in danger, and all bound to protect one another whether it’s in our job description or not.”

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It is the end of August and Norah Ramsey, a single mom is raising her 15-year-old daughter, Violet in Raleigh, North Carolina. Norah, who is estranged from her mother Polly, hopes to make a better

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With everything going on in our world these days, chances are you’ve not thought much about the many difficult issues surrounding adoption.

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If you follow American politics with more than a cursory glance, and who doesn’t these days, it may strike you as odd that someone would try to write a novel of political satire set within and cent

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“Connie Schultz has a reputation for writing about everyday people and their lives.

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“A riveting, inventive, quietly disconcerting page-turner.”

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Lane Meckler is a columnist known as “Ask Roxie” in which she gives advice to help people online with problems.

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“Rob Doyle’s writing leaves us with—'the sense, euphoric and terrifying, that everything was possible again.’”

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“eminently readable and emotionally intense.”

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Garden Jungle as a piece of art is original and noteworthy.”

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Maeve Stephens, a 36-year-old sportswriter has just lost her job when the periodical she writes for claims bankruptcy.

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“It’s a book about the unexpected comfort of being a woman, of living alone, of having friends, of loving family members. It’s smart and unexpected and delightful.”

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“Arianna Dagnino is to be complimented on her storytelling ability. She describes the beauty of South Africa through the careful choice of words, providing a cultural educa

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“This is an author who never fails to entertain.”

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“Too Fat to Go to the Moon mainly distinguishes itself by its lack of charm, insight, plot, humanity, or willingness to engage on any real intellectual level.

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If you’ve read Mary Miller’s captivating debut, The Last Days of California—an eccentrically peopled coming-of-age tale—you might be expecting something similar from her second novel,

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“Throw Me to the Wolves is a powerful story of media manipulation and how otherwise decent people can be corrupted by the power of money and influence.”

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“The Children’s House is best read slowly. It’s a story to be savored, lingered over rather than hurried through to its surprise ending . . .”

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“cleverly suffused with New York sensibilities, politics, pop culture, and celebrity as it seamlessly segues between fact and fiction.”

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The Ensemble is a novel played to music. It’s the story of four musicians who at college decide to form a string quartet.

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“Bealport is often uproariously and corrosively funny.”

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“For readers who savor stories of relationships, redemption, and transformation, the Backman oeuvre virtually demands binge-reading.”

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