Literary Fiction

Reviewed by: 

This second novel by the renowned French writer, Marguerite Duras, was written in 1943 when she was 29, and originally published by Gallimard in 1944 as La Vie tranquille.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“The book desperately wants to convey its message of human connectedness with all the species that share this planet. Gil walks 2,400 miles to appreciate and then deliver this message.

Reviewed by: 

Signal Fires is perfectly crafted and developed . . .”

Reviewed by: 

In echoing Dickens, Barbara Kingsolver has written a social justice novel all her own, one only she could write, for our time and for the ages.

Reviewed by: 

The theme of The Mountain in the Sea can be summarized in a quote from one of its characters, Dr.

Reviewed by: 

It’s interesting that the title of Ian McEwan’s wide-angle and engrossing family history is Lessons, because his protagonist, Roland Baines, is inclined to abandon his teachers.

Reviewed by: 

“Wade’s pitch-perfect, personality-driven dialogue sings in the voice of life, and his ability to meld existential thought, situational metaphor, and cinematic setting is a full-bodied expe

Reviewed by: 

“A fascinating visit to a little-known pocket of U.S. immigrant history.”

Reviewed by: 

Mr. Wilder and Me is, in part, a homage to the great film director and producer, Billy Wilder, and his screenwriter/friend, Iz Diamond.

Reviewed by: 

“incandescent”

The narrator of Yiyun Li’s newest book is Agnes, but she insists the story she tells isn’t really about her, but about her best friend Fabienne:

Reviewed by: 

“We’re in the presence of an author both wholly assured and tentative, both nagged by the complexities of narrative and able to exploit them.”

Reviewed by: 

“Cruz has created an unforgettable character in Cara. And readers will feel like they’ve made a new, fascinating friend.”

Reviewed by: 

“very funny . . . if you’re ready to laugh at pandemic absurdities, this is the book for you.”

Reviewed by: 

“Brilliantly conceived. . . . There are court intrigues, whispered rumors, a clever subplot about the power of painting, what it reveals as well as what it hides . . .

Reviewed by: 

“A powerful story of community, faith, and belief, and which ones truly matter versus ones that are false distractions.”

Reviewed by: 

In the early- to mid-20th century, a state school named Willowbrook was located in Staten Island, New York.

Reviewed by: 

“Early 20th century writing, especially translated from one language to another, can be challenging to read, but Nèmirovsky’s story and Smith’s translation make Master of Souls

Reviewed by: 

Debbie Macomber has once again given readers a delightful story, relatable and likeable characters, and the perfect level of tension.

Reviewed by: 

This novel is an insightful tale of an unnamed young woman venturing into the field of medicine.

Reviewed by: 

“lyrical beauty of Manfredi’s prose . . . at its heart, The Empire of Dirt is a rich puzzle impossible to resist.”

Reviewed by: 

“tightly crafted women’s fiction, with a sensitive look at love, conscience, and loyalty.”

Reviewed by: 

“This is a very funny, easy to read novel that has an edge thanks to its main character’s charade.”

Pages