Literary Fiction

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Can a novel be about a moment? About a group of people, unique and familiar at the same time, living through that moment that doesn’t yet have a name or any one specific date?

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“has greater resonance, the characters are older, have lived more, have more to say. As a result, the stories are . . . more rewarding . . .”

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You like this character, she’s under your skin; you want to go on this journey with her. And then she says, “I’ve decided to die.” It’s only page 27.

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“within these pages, there are passages that approach the sublime. There is pain, anguish, horror, and sadness, alongside passages of subtle human feelings conveyed without words.

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“enjoy the complex characters drawn with beautiful prose and flashes of humor . . .”

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“Graham Swift has a remarkable ability to slip back and forth in time, while identifying the many small incidents and markers that shape and reshape the lives of his characters.”

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The fourth book in Marilynne Robinson’s Gilead cycle features Jack Boughton, the prodigal son of the Presbyterian minister, Robert Boughton.

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“The denouement ties life, love, and mystery together, as all excellent murder mysteries do.”

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“To find meaning and humanity in confusing times and to convey that understanding to the reader is the ultimate gift a writer can provide.”

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1986. Fulgencio Ramirez, a pharmacist in a border town called La Frontera, reads the obit section every morning, waiting for a man to die so he can move in and scoop up his wife.

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Miss Iceland is a beautiful novel about artistic aspiration and friendship. The storytelling sparkles . . .”

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“The Boy in the Field is a literary mystery novel. . . . Just not the kind that focuses on what happens on a patch of land, a highway, or even a country.

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Beneficence, Meredith Hall’s first novel, appears 13 years after her prize-winning memoir Without a Map.

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“deeply evocative, eminently readable . . .”

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“Accept that you might have conventional horizons. Stop asking for life to be a poem. Why is it so difficult to speak plainly without allusions to books, films, and art?”

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The Paris Children is a page-turning and inspiring story of how courage and family ties can survive even the worst of evil.”

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“although McNally’s stories seem unbelievable at first, they throb with a recognizable human heartbeat, powered by love and regret and the mystery of life.”

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“Like with the best plot-driven novels, you need to know what happens at the end. Like with the best character-driven novels, you bleed with them along the way.”

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“We learn of a father’s love, a mother’s brokenness, disparity between brothers and sisters, yet, in the ugliest or most beautiful of exchanges, true kinship and bonds are discovered.”

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“As a feat of reclamation for the Camelot-like heyday of Black Detroit, Black Bottom Saints, like the legendary impresario at its center, makes plentiful Motown magic.

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“You’ll open this novel because of history, read on because of story, and close it knowing more about your own life, right here, right now.”

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“A steady undercurrent of tension runs through The Frightened Ones as Suleima’s relationship with her inner world and the one around her are constantly on the point of fracturing.”

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“Throughout the story Austin attempts to make a point of women’s lives during the 19th century presumably using this tactic to make Lydia appear as an independent woman with the desire to s

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The story of a hero seeking to return home is one of our earliest forms of literature—the obstacles that Odysseus faced on his journey back to Ithaca are etched in our collective mind.

“Edie just wants to be herself, but trapped somewhere between the luster of her skin and her own lust for rough sex and only half-requited love, she never seems to figure out exactly who th

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