Literary Fiction

Reviewed by: 

The United States has passed the Personhood Amendment, giving fertilized human eggs full legal rights as citizens. As a result, abortion is banned.

Reviewed by: 

Atia Abawi, a journalist and an Afghan refugee who made it to Germany as a child, has written a deeply gripping and affecting novel about the global refugee crisis that continues across Europe toda

Reviewed by: 

“a haunting story of one man’s determination to assuage his grief by keeping the dead alive and another man’s struggle to give them peace.”

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Anyone who enjoys literary or psychological fiction won’t be able to put this whip smart novel down.”

Reviewed by: 

While it seems to be universally the case that authors would rather have their books written about than not, it is also the case that it is sometimes better not to review a given book than to revie

Reviewed by: 

“a novel of friendships balanced with hate, set against the backdrop of a primitive landscape . . .”

Reviewed by: 

Veronica Gerber Bicecci’s debut novel, second book and her first translated into English, Empty Set (Conjunto vacío), has multiple dualities—the verbal and the visual, th

Reviewed by: 

“If William Gibson, Michael Connelly, and Neil Gaiman wrote a series, it might end up looking like The Familiar.”

Reviewed by: 

“a story of long-ago trauma causing a deep psychological split of a person’s consciousness.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

John Banville’s tour de force tribute to Henry James’s The Portrait of a Lady will gladden the hearts of readers with a penchant for languorous descriptions of nature and introspective cha

Reviewed by: 

“Interesting, intriguing, and informative, Fools and Mortals is highly recommended.”

Interesting, Intriguing, Informative

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

“An entertaining, intriguing, and well thought-out novel with hints of the supernatural hovering in the background.”

Reviewed by: 

Clara Kelley is not who they think she is. She’s not the experienced Irish maid who was hired to work in one of Pittsburgh’s grandest households.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

On a “muggy July day” in 1969, the four Gold siblings, ages 7 to 13, nervously visit a fortune teller, on Hester Street in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, who supposedly can predict the date of a

Reviewed by: 

When Autumn was published 15 months ago—the first in a planned “seasonal” quartet by the award-winning, Scottish-born writer Ali Smith—it was dubbed “the first great Brexit novel.” So what

Reviewed by: 

“a dramatic and interesting look into the past of a town and the lives of those who’ve dwelled in it.”

Reviewed by: 

“a story closely reminiscent of a good number of Poe’s short stories . . .”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Neel Mukherjee’s A State of Freedom is a deeply affecting, innovative, and beautifully written novel that is hard to put down and difficult to forget.

Reviewed by: 

“plenty of dogged Robicheaux detecting, a high body count, and welcome exchanges of dialogue with an authentic Louisiana sound.”

Reviewed by: 

Turkey in the modern world is a diverse, complicated, and struggling nation, one that Shafak again masterfully depicts in her new novel Three Daughters of Eve. However, not just content to

Reviewed by: 

“a serious book, beautifully written, that explores the effect of ruinous family secrets.”

Reviewed by: 

Jenny Diski’s short stories are often unsettling, describing in minute detail the troubled thoughts that accompany her characters’ everyday activities as they go for a lunchtime walk, take a bath,

Reviewed by: 

“one stunning and eloquent final soliloquy.”

Reviewed by: 

Fiona Mozley's lushly written, yet perfectly understated debut novel, Elmet, opens with a young boy on the run.

Reviewed by: 

“appealing to those individuals who enjoy having the limits of language tested and like their philosophy served with a tinge of existentialism.”

Pages