Literary Fiction

Reviewed by: 

“Although frequently painful to read, The German House is a condemnation of the Nazi past, but also an exploration of survivors’ guilt, as well as families in conflict.”

Reviewed by: 

Staten Island Stories concerns ugly times and circumstances, but the people and the stories are beautiful.”

Reviewed by: 

“beautifully crafted, unusually structured novel about the inescapability of memory, the tragic scars left by trauma and abuse, and the abuse of power.”

Reviewed by: 

“An escapist read in which the lawmen are the outlaws, and the good guys win.”

Reviewed by: 

Emma Donoghue is a magnificent writer, but Akin is not her best novel. Still, it’s a high bar.

Reviewed by: 

Writing good historical fiction is a particular challenge. Not only must an author craft a good story, they have to get the history correct, especially the mood and setting for the plot.

Reviewed by: 

Not every novel has to feel like a novel. Global literature is, arguably, all the better for works that broke every rule and succeeded.

Reviewed by: 

John Connolly’s recent book, A Book of Bones, is difficult reading for several reasons—its extreme length, its wandering story arc, and its disappearing protagonist, just to name a few.

Reviewed by: 

Though The Christmas Boutique is the 21st book in the Elm Creek Series, this enchanting Christmas tale can stand well on its own.

Reviewed by: 

Nothing More Dangerous is the next best thing to Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird . . .”

Reviewed by: 

It may be tough to read complex novels in these days of social media platforms and fast food fiction, but Mama Hissa's Mice by Saud Al-Sanousi, translated by Sawad Hussain, is worth your t

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Space Invaders is a novella, barely 66 pages, each one only seven-by-five inches, that effectively holds between its covers a story extending far beyond the physical space it might occupy

Reviewed by: 

The Devil’s Slave is gripping historical fiction . . .”

Reviewed by: 

The opening chapter of Fishnet, the debut novel by Kirsten Innes, is a mystery that takes almost the entire novel to piece together. Who is speaking? What is happening?

Reviewed by: 

“Ta-Nehisi Coates has long been among America’s most clear-eyed scholars of race and racism. The Water Dancer is a masterpiece built within that clarity.

Reviewed by: 

“Some native Hawaiians today might argue that Captain Putnam was misguided in searching for pirates in the South Pacific, because the real pirates had already arrived in Hawaii under the gu

Reviewed by: 

“Heather Morris reminds us about the human side of the Holocaust and helps us remember with her fine storytelling.”

Reviewed by: 

“Perry is a master of the British historical novel, this time leaving the Victorian era behind and delving into a new but volatile century.”

Reviewed by: 

“Lit with insight, affection, and the deep tenderness that can accompany long-term grief, Sallis’ Sarah Jane is that most unusual of mysteries: one that investigates the soul, walk

Reviewed by: 

“Fans of Virgil Flowers will love Bloody Genius, as will fans of Lucas Davenport and the Prey series.

Reviewed by: 

Frankisstein by Jeanette Winterson is a novel that is also a metaphor.

Reviewed by: 

“Rafala seems to love language as much as his characters love their farms and their patron saint. That’s a powerful combination, and it fuels a compelling novel.”

Reviewed by: 

“Each novel Man Booker finalist Deborah Levy writes comes nearer perfection.

Reviewed by: 

“You will end up in love with Olive because she is a ton of well-written fun. You’ll enjoy her musings and put-downs and her reflections.

Pages