Literary Fiction

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Mostly Dead Things is an odd creature: a book widely recommended and popularly listed, but marked by a fundamental discomfort that defies mainstream appeal.

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“Undercard is a good crime novel and a solid debut for David Albertyn.”

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“a shadowy fairy tale, in which two lovers, of which one, unfortunately, is dead, live in an enchanted house inhabited with wondrously quirky beings.”

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“If Carlos Manuel Alvarez’s debut novel The Fallen is any indicator, he is a Cuban writer to watch.”

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“My trainer believes in me,” Remington Alabaster tells Serenata, his wife of 32 years. Until now he has been a reliable couch potato, she an equally predictable fitness maven.

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Untold Night and Day is a deliciously complex novel that satisfies at each layer as the reader continues to decipher its codes and hidde

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Everything Under is a seductive book. It’s dark, poetic in language and image, and drives toward a monolithic tragedy.”

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Among the masterful short story writers of the 18th century in Russia—Turgenev, Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy—it is Anton Chekhov whose words are most known outside of the motherland because

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“Even in the darkest sections, Ted O’Connell’s debut novel is upbeat, witty, and full of ideas about art, reality, truth, identity, fate, language, the rise of China on the world stage, Naz

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Forty stories in 160 pages. Short: some one page, a couple, four to five pages. Short: but with a bang. Short: You will read in a flash and say, “What was that?”

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“Friend offers a fascinating glimpse into the realities of North Korean life.

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The Book of Longings is well named, well inspired, and well imagined—a superlative effort from a writer at the top of her game.”

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This may be the real gift of this book and its real magic, Susan Petrone’s moving us from indifference to understanding and caring for others and our world, and that’s a v

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“Thammavongsa says vital things about the immigrant experience: how refugees strive to fit in and yet retain cultural traditions; how race is entwined with class; and how family is, in the

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Young Once is an elegant noir written by a master prose stylist.”

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“it’s the perennial conflict between motherhood and career, but not the way most readers might expect.”

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The Beetle is a fine period piece, as well as an entertaining mystery that has withstood the test of time.”

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“Southern gothic novels such as Blackwood are not for the fainthearted, but for those who love symbolism, metaphor, and complex characters filled with angst and tortured self-refle

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Julia Alvarez is a good storyteller, as anyone who has read her most well-known novels, In the Time of the Butterflies, and How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents, knows.

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Sin eaters are historically marginal figures, outcasts of Britain who ate bread from coffins to absolve the sins of the dead.

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“an engaging and fast-moving ride in the company of memorable characters, both good and bad, across a troubling social, cultural, historical and still timely landscape.”

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“Nemens is a skilled writer who captures the many dramas and nuances of spring training.”

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“Rob Doyle’s writing leaves us with—'the sense, euphoric and terrifying, that everything was possible again.’”

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“To describe Lewinson’s smart, lean, sharp prose as all over the place is praise indeed in the case of this remarkable novella.”

“Call me Ishmael.”

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“Meta-textual, self-reflexive, obscurely funny, and playful beyond easy articulation, it’s the perfect book for readers who delight in ‘the materiality of . . .

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