Literary Fiction

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“The Dead Letter is worthy of your attention, not only as an interesting landmark in the history of American crime fiction, but also as an enjoyable, entertaining

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In this extraordinary debut novel, Meng Jin writes about numerous themes ranging from family relations, platonic and romantic love, the pain and pleasure of memory, and escaping one’s past in order

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“In a tumultuous time of instability and uncertainty, Nathan Harris brings to the foreground humanity’s aptitude for survival, compassion, and goodwill even in their darkest hour.”

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Cowboy Graves lacks the wild ambition and gravity of Bolaño’s best work, but it’s still a tasty summation of his talents.”

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“Whether Jim Shepard is a prophet or just a great writer with a clever concept, we’ll probably never really know.

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“For the reader who expects an exciting spy thriller, this book does not deliver. The plot is less exciting, but Starford’s premise holds water.”

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“it is in the quietest moments that this novel finds its greatest strengths.”

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Every year, there is a pilgrimage (of sorts).

“Sometimes the highway doesn’t take you all that far.”

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Yaara Shehori’s novel Aquarium follows the lives of sisters Dori and Lili Ackerman, apparently deaf children being raised by deaf parents in relative poverty in a nameless country in some

Of Women and Salt is a beautifully written novel that turns like a kaleidoscope in the light, illuminating the blurry delineation of who is an insider and who an outsider.”

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Readers can count on bestselling author Jessica Anya Blau for a breezy coming-of-age story about a nice, middle-class, teenage girl who learns about life during a tumultuous summer with an offbeat

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Jessie van Eerden has created a surprising protagonist and a moving story full of unexpected moments that never stretch into the bizarre or unrealistic.

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Leonora in the Morning Light is less a story about love, and more a story about finding your own authentic voice.

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As quietly as snow falling on “every tip of the picket fence that leaned drunkenly toward the road, . . .

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This book is a good example of how packaging and promotion can hit or miss with an audience.

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In Marisa Silver’s book, The Mysteries, she tackles the conundrum of relationships—of family, of friends, of children, of adults. And therein lies the mystery of the title.

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“For those who want a close-up portrait of a complex society with a rich history and plenty of contradictions, My Old Home is an excellent place to begin.”

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The question of literature composed in a second language is a vexed and interesting one.

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“Nava is an impassioned writer who has once again created a fascinating picture of Los Angeles at an earlier, less enlightened time, centering on gay men trying to shed the shame they have

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Lynette’s alarm goes off at 3:15 a.m. She is 30 years old. She wears ten-year-old sweats and wool socks to bed. Her room’s warmth depends on a portable heater; it doesn’t work very well.

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“A unique and heartfelt story that taps into an uncommon family dynamic, showcasing how love is resilient and healing, even among the broken and the brokenhearted.”

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“In its winding subterranean travelogue, and profoundly evocative, allegorical blues surrealism, The Man Who Lived Underground reads less like a follow-up to Wright’s naturalist

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Jacob Dinezon (1851–1919) has been a commanding figure in late 19th century Eastern European Jewish literature.

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