Fiction

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“Hats off to Gildiner for doing a heroic therapeutic job and for writing about it so eloquently.”

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You like this character, she’s under your skin; you want to go on this journey with her. And then she says, “I’ve decided to die.” It’s only page 27.

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“the story Follett weaves grabs you from the start and holds you in its grip till the fairy tale ending.

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Midway through Eshkol Nevo’s The Last Interview, the narrator—who may or may not be Nevo himself, an uncertainty Nevo may or may not want his readers to entertain—slyly explains the ruse o

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“riveting and action packed right up to the astonishing and surprisingly satisfying ending.”

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“Dark, haunting, lyrical, and innovative, beautiful and heartfelt . . .”

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“This delightful Christmas story can be enjoyed any time of the year.”

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“Doering's wordsmithing is the absolute gold standard and leads readers to a stunner of an ending.”

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“a sweet romp of a book . . .”

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“within these pages, there are passages that approach the sublime. There is pain, anguish, horror, and sadness, alongside passages of subtle human feelings conveyed without words.

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John Rebus has been retired from the Scottish Police for a while, but something keeps pulling him back in.

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“What distinguishes Goodnight Beautiful is Molloy’s spectacular feat of misdirection and uncanny success in unfolding revelations that are surprising yet believable from the early

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“a powerful story of how the resentment and pain of abandonment can sweep the guilty as well as the innocent into a maelstrom of hate from which none will emerge unscathed.”

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Daughters of the Wild has an intriguing, deeply marketable premise: oppressed and repressed girls, isolated from the outside world, “tending a mysterious plant called the Vine of Heaven” i

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“Using her remarkable, literary voice to investigate the psychological experiences of victims, Oates requires that we willingly suspend our disbelief and reject realism as a means to identi

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As with every novel in the universe, whether it works for you or not depends on your tastes and frame of reference.

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“a compelling and rewarding journey.”

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“From the beginning we know we’re dealing with the kind of unreliable narrator who’s voiced so many of the early 21st century’s bestsellers.”

 

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“Why struggle to open a door between us when the whole wall is an illusion?”

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“. . . supremely skilled writing even though the plot goes missing in action early on.”

This is an odd duck of a book, no question about it.

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Having completed the last round of her medical internship, 28-year-old Sarah James is relaxing at Paradise Cove in Big Sur, a resort recommended to her by one of her patients.

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“Gates does a particularly good job of setting clues and red herrings for the reader to deal with and ties up all the loose ends.”

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“Like the strongest authors in this genre, Selfon bares the effects of death on each of us.

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“enjoy the complex characters drawn with beautiful prose and flashes of humor . . .”

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