Fiction.

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At first glance, the timing of New York Review Books Classics’ rerelease of Helen Weinzweig’s Basic Black with Pearls is almost as intriguing as the novel itself.

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His Sinful Touch by Candace Camp is yet another a delightful romp in her Mad Morelands series.

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In her oversized new picture book newcomer Ami Shin, a recent and celebrated graduate of the Cambridge School of Illustration based in Korea, is taken with London architecture.

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From the design table of Marianne Dubuc comes a wordless picture book, The Fish and the Cat, to add to her illustrious collection of a dozen-plus picture books.

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“Absurdly compelling, packing a double barrel blast . . .”

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A new novel by Julian Barnes is exciting.

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“Amos Decker novels just keep getting better and better, and it’s partly due to the careful in-depth characterization Baldacci gives his main character.”

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“A different kind of detective story, The Spirit Photographer is an American gothic novel set in a time of post-war turmoil.”

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“This is the novel that started it all.”

It’s the late 1940s. Mike Hammer has come to Killington, Rhode Island, to keep a promise to a friend.

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Narwhal and Jellyfish are the stars of this easy reader series by Ben Clanton.

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Alan Hollinghurst’s novel, The Sparsholt Affair, presents a bit of a conundrum.

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There are more and more nonfiction picture books being published, a very welcome trend.

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In The Driest Season, it is 1943, a war is being fought, a drought is threatening middle America’s farmland, and death visits unexpectedly.

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“This book will be a welcome addition to modern-day discussions of women’s rights, multiculturalism, and online technologies.”

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It is said that imitation is the purest form of flattery. Be that true, the question becomes what hold does a feeble imitation of a literary classic have on flattery.

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The Folded Land reveals a landscape in which both magical creatures and humans display their weaknesses and strengths, revealing why these two beings are equally fascinated by and

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"required reading for those who want sour along with the sweet of life."

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Lincoln Rhyme and Amelia Sachs return to New York City in Jeffery Deaver’s new novel, The Cutting Edge, in which Manhattan’s diamond district is gripped by terror.

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“a tale of choices made because of love”

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“The Mitford Murders is the first in what promises to be an absorbing mystery series.”

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The sudden death of Harry Ackerman’s father opens the door to an explosive mix of seductions, obsessions, and dark secrets from the past.

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Jefferson James raised his daughter Jillian when her mother took off after her birth. Throughout Jillian's life, she learned nothing about her mom, and her dad was close-mouthed about his past.

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Although slender in scope, Eventide by Therese Bohman scales one woman’s life experience in three dimensions.

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Jules Davis, a high school senior, loves her two best friends but envies them, too.

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“a tale of how a single decision can change a life—or end it forever.”

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