Fiction

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“Thanks to its fascinating premise and to the strength of chapters told from her point of view, the book succeeds by constantly keeping the main character off balance as the moments from th

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Is it better to read a story collection sequentially?

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“this story sends a message of the bygone days, while offering laughter, insight, fear, pain, and a deep and abiding friendship.”

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“Suspenseful, filled with evocative writing capturing the reader’s empathy for the characters, The Night Will Find Us takes our fear of that which lurks in the dark and transfers i

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The Wonder Boy of Whistle Stop is a captivating novel with characters and relationships to be savored, as well as ample servings of hope and inspiration.”

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Growing up can be difficult, but having a strong faith, a loving family, and a good sense of direction as to where your future will lead you make things easier. And being in love also helps.

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Welcome a new heroine to the world of wilderness thrillers: Alex Carter, wildlife biologist extraordinaire.

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“Osman has done an outstanding job of bringing his characters to life and making them as individual as if they were real.”

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“Woods provides a lively romp of a book, but it’s built for entertainment, not solving puzzles. Pick up a copy to update your sense of why James Bond was and is adored.”

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Can a novel be about a moment? About a group of people, unique and familiar at the same time, living through that moment that doesn’t yet have a name or any one specific date?

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“has greater resonance, the characters are older, have lived more, have more to say. As a result, the stories are . . . more rewarding . . .”

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“packed with crucial climate-change information framed in fairly comprehensible terms. . . .

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“a chilling story of identity and what happens when a person’s self-reality is voluntarily submerged with another’s.”

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“a definite adventure in a Gilded Age, full of scandals of the elite and crimes of the nondescript, where some readers may find a jaundiced correlation to today’s world.”

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The Four Profound Weaves is a beautifully articulated exploration of queer identity and transformation.

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“Hornsby's vivid description of the Kansas bar would make Hemingway smile.”

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“Hats off to Gildiner for doing a heroic therapeutic job and for writing about it so eloquently.”

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You like this character, she’s under your skin; you want to go on this journey with her. And then she says, “I’ve decided to die.” It’s only page 27.

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“the story Follett weaves grabs you from the start and holds you in its grip till the fairy tale ending.

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Midway through Eshkol Nevo’s The Last Interview, the narrator—who may or may not be Nevo himself, an uncertainty Nevo may or may not want his readers to entertain—slyly explains the ruse o

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“What distinguishes Goodnight Beautiful is Molloy’s spectacular feat of misdirection and uncanny success in unfolding revelations that are surprising yet believable from the early

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“within these pages, there are passages that approach the sublime. There is pain, anguish, horror, and sadness, alongside passages of subtle human feelings conveyed without words.

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“riveting and action packed right up to the astonishing and surprisingly satisfying ending.”

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John Rebus has been retired from the Scottish Police for a while, but something keeps pulling him back in.

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