Fiction

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the tangled web of mysteries keeps the reader guessing. At the end, the author uses strands from the web to set the stage for the next novel in the series.”

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“an exciting, disturbing portrait of Hollywood’s cultural power during its heyday.” 

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“This could have been yet another Arthurian tale told ad nauseum over the decades, but here Lev Grossman stakes out a different kind of story that’s all his own.”

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“entertaining and fast-paced. . . . Readers who like plot-driven stories with heroic characters, dragons, and happy endings will find much to enjoy.”

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More spy story than mystery, Maggie Hope's last mission has as many twists and turns as a rollercoaster.

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"The Family Experiment is first-rate and highly readable, science fiction with a heart and soul."

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“a taut, compelling thriller with well-rounded, complex, and believable characters who must grapple with an uncomfortable decision . . .”

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Kevin Barry is an Irish writer to the core with his wild, dark humor and his Gaelic intonations, a beautifully skewed syntax holding up a delicate balance of spluttering facetiousness and a sly ack

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Long Island Compromise begins with the brazen kidnapping of Jewish businessman Carl Fletcher, taken by thugs from the driveway of his upper middle-class mansion in the mundane and fictiona

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It’s hard to publish a sequel to a powerful or popular novel, and even more so in a case like this, where author Joyce Maynard has said that she never intended to return to the complicated family s

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The reader is encouraged to participate, become one with the natural space as well as an observer of it, and see what variety and grandiosity nature has . .

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“Everyone has three lives: a public life, a private life, and a secret life.” Gabriel Garcia Marquez is quoted as saying on the frontispiece of The Lost Letters from Martha’s Vineyard.

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“captivating, powerful, and touching.”

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The premise for Pearson’s story, Bright and Tender Dark, is a classic whodunit. Karlie Richards is a college student in North Carolina, and she is murdered.

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Bear is a dark tale, redeemed by good writing.”

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“As absorbing as it is insightful and as entertaining as it is sobering, The Righteous Arrows is an excellent read and very highly recommended.”

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“Mwanza’s writing captures her own passion as well as that of her central character.”

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“The themes tackled in this story are important, painful, and relevant for our modern day, presented in beautiful prose and complex storytelling.”

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“the book’s language is lyrical and poetic throughout, making even difficult passages somehow beautiful to read even as they raise goosebumps.”

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“block out a few days on your calendar to settle into a cushy chair, put up your feet, and fall helplessly—and gleefully—into this riveting story.”

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“How far would you go for a friend in need if it meant your life and liberty might come crashing down upon you?”

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Brat, the debut novel of Gabriel Smith, has been alternately described as “thrillingly claustrophobic” (Ed Park, author of Same Bed Different Dreams) and “jauntily creepy” (Gabrie

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“Roxana Robinson is one of our best novelists, writing about mature people and their very real emotions.”

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“Alex Espinosa has drawn rich, fascinating characters and offers a detailed picture of Mexico at a politically turbulent time and Los Angeles at key moments in its recent history.”

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“an enchanting, tenacious story of loss and resilience, and a vivid reminder of the fragility of our lives and environment and all the ways they are connected.”

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