Fiction.

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“So much evil,” says Lisbeth Salander. She says this not in fear, but as if in stunned wonder. Wasp is bound by the coils of evil which flex, painfully and slowly squeezing the life out of her.

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Legendary comics writer Lee Falk will probably always be best known for The Phantom, the costumed vigilante that he created back in 1936.

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“a breathless, oxygen-deprived framework intensifying the terror of the written word”

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Oh, boy, oh boy, oh boy-o!

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“a different kind of story of a girl and her dog.”

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At first glance, the timing of New York Review Books Classics’ rerelease of Helen Weinzweig’s Basic Black with Pearls is almost as intriguing as the novel itself.

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His Sinful Touch by Candace Camp is yet another a delightful romp in her Mad Morelands series.

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In her oversized new picture book newcomer Ami Shin, a recent and celebrated graduate of the Cambridge School of Illustration based in Korea, is taken with London architecture.

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From the design table of Marianne Dubuc comes a wordless picture book, The Fish and the Cat, to add to her illustrious collection of a dozen-plus picture books.

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“Absurdly compelling, packing a double barrel blast . . .”

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A new novel by Julian Barnes is exciting.

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“Amos Decker novels just keep getting better and better, and it’s partly due to the careful in-depth characterization Baldacci gives his main character.”

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“A different kind of detective story, The Spirit Photographer is an American gothic novel set in a time of post-war turmoil.”

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“This is the novel that started it all.”

It’s the late 1940s. Mike Hammer has come to Killington, Rhode Island, to keep a promise to a friend.

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Narwhal and Jellyfish are the stars of this easy reader series by Ben Clanton.

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Alan Hollinghurst’s novel, The Sparsholt Affair, presents a bit of a conundrum.

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There are more and more nonfiction picture books being published, a very welcome trend.

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In The Driest Season, it is 1943, a war is being fought, a drought is threatening middle America’s farmland, and death visits unexpectedly.

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“This book will be a welcome addition to modern-day discussions of women’s rights, multiculturalism, and online technologies.”

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It is said that imitation is the purest form of flattery. Be that true, the question becomes what hold does a feeble imitation of a literary classic have on flattery.

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The Folded Land reveals a landscape in which both magical creatures and humans display their weaknesses and strengths, revealing why these two beings are equally fascinated by and

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"required reading for those who want sour along with the sweet of life."

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Lincoln Rhyme and Amelia Sachs return to New York City in Jeffery Deaver’s new novel, The Cutting Edge, in which Manhattan’s diamond district is gripped by terror.

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“a tale of choices made because of love”

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“The Mitford Murders is the first in what promises to be an absorbing mystery series.”

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