Genre Fiction

Reviewed by: 

The United States has passed the Personhood Amendment, giving fertilized human eggs full legal rights as citizens. As a result, abortion is banned.

Reviewed by: 

Atia Abawi, a journalist and an Afghan refugee who made it to Germany as a child, has written a deeply gripping and affecting novel about the global refugee crisis that continues across Europe toda

Reviewed by: 

While it seems to be universally the case that authors would rather have their books written about than not, it is also the case that it is sometimes better not to review a given book than to revie

Reviewed by: 

Markswoman introduces a bright new series to fantasy fiction. It’s a strong start, but it comes with a hitch.

Reviewed by: 

Many women's biggest desire is to have children, and Sara Cabot is not exempt.

Reviewed by: 

“Interesting, intriguing, and informative, Fools and Mortals is highly recommended.”

Interesting, Intriguing, Informative

Reviewed by: 

“Fans of historical fiction or tales of women defying the odds will be immediately drawn in to Runyan’s crisp, effortless prose.”

Reviewed by: 

Clara Kelley is not who they think she is. She’s not the experienced Irish maid who was hired to work in one of Pittsburgh’s grandest households.

Reviewed by: 

The most important thing to understand right up front about City of Endless Night, the latest Pendergast novel by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child, is that there are a lot of people who r

Reviewed by: 

“unbearable suspense, spine-tingling, tension-filled, terrifying, shocking and totally unexpected ending.”

Reviewed by: 

“An excellent read from a remarkable storyteller.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

On a “muggy July day” in 1969, the four Gold siblings, ages 7 to 13, nervously visit a fortune teller, on Hester Street in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, who supposedly can predict the date of a

Reviewed by: 

“a dramatic and interesting look into the past of a town and the lives of those who’ve dwelled in it.”

Reviewed by: 

“a story closely reminiscent of a good number of Poe’s short stories . . .”

Reviewed by: 

When Autumn was published 15 months ago—the first in a planned “seasonal” quartet by the award-winning, Scottish-born writer Ali Smith—it was dubbed “the first great Brexit novel.” So what

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Kudos to Dodd and Nosy Crow/Candlewick for doing what reads like a mama-baby picture book that’s accessible to all children and all kinds of parents.”

Reviewed by: 

Be careful what you wish for, because you may get it, is a very famous saying.

Reviewed by: 

“an entertaining escape that showcases the virtues of logical thinking, along with a toe dip into a bygone industrial age.”

Reviewed by: 

Even the greatest novelists eventually reach an advanced age.

Reviewed by: 

Book Three of Tony Schumacher’s alternate history of WWII Britain pits Detective John Rossett against a rogue Nazi assassin called the Bear and a group of Nazi officers colluding with British Resis

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

“an amazing historical novel, revealing the horrors of WWI through the letters exchanged by Tom and Evie.”

Reviewed by: 

Fiona Mozley's lushly written, yet perfectly understated debut novel, Elmet, opens with a young boy on the run.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Continuity for parents, pleasure for kids, totally satisfies . . .”

Reviewed by: 

The election of Donald Trump as America’s president has shed new light on something called the “deep state.” This term, which was first widely used in the case of the Republic of Turkey, specifical

Reviewed by: 

“Havana Libre works well as a sociological commentary, but as a mystery novel or a thriller, it’s a dud.”

Pages