Genre Fiction

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Perhaps any novel that takes place largely in the minds of octogenarians and an arguably distraught—possibly disturbed—single mother may seem to wander over wide psychic territory.

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This Town Sleeps is genuinely enjoyable. It has threads of mystery and romance. It combines humor and horror. It’s a good book . . .”

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“a haunting portrait of a nation slowly collapsing . . .”

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This wrenching, engrossing, and sometimes windy novel arrives on our shores firmly rooted in the Elena Ferrante tradition: a portrayal of an area in the south of Italy (Puglia in this case) that fo

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“Mather’s chaotic scenes that place Del in life-threatening situations, and of which she expertly extricates herself, are well written and page turning.”

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Willa and Harper Lakey are as close as two sisters could be, even considering their dissimilar personalities.

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A touch lighter on the hard science of space flight and a lot heavier on intrigue, new and old readers will find themselves quickly immersed in this complex alternate hist

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“For a perfect summer read, look no further. You’re not likely to find more beautiful, more distinctive prose anywhere.”

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“Connie Schultz has a reputation for writing about everyday people and their lives.

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You don’t need to love dogs to love this book. You just have to love and respect animals and enjoy police procedurals.

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This is the authors’ third book taking place in a fictional community in America called Night Vale, where ghosts, angels, aliens, and government conspiracies are adroitly brought to life.

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“moments of brilliance . . .”

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“A riveting, inventive, quietly disconcerting page-turner.”

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Surely, Alexander McCall Smith isn’t the only philosopher in the world who writes novels. But he’s probably the best known and one of the most commercially successful.

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It is the summer of 1993 and 23-year-old Mallory Blessing is desperate to get away from her Baltimore childhood home.

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“Focusing on estrangement, abuse, forgiveness, and a chance for new beginnings, The Bitter and Sweet of Cherry Season is sure to tug at the heartstrings.” 

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Mostly Dead Things is an odd creature: a book widely recommended and popularly listed, but marked by a fundamental discomfort that defies mainstream appeal.

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“a shadowy fairy tale, in which two lovers, of which one, unfortunately, is dead, live in an enchanted house inhabited with wondrously quirky beings.”

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“If Carlos Manuel Alvarez’s debut novel The Fallen is any indicator, he is a Cuban writer to watch.”

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The Gordons of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, spend every summer at the century-old saltbox passed down from Ed Gordon's grandparents.

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And I Do Not Forgive You is uneven, but where it shines, it’s wonderful.”

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Boys of Alabama is a beautiful book that carries the reader along on a tide of rich, eloquent language.”

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Looking for an escape from quarantine boredom, but want to minimize your screen time?  Then Hillary Mantel’s The Mirror and the Light, the final, nearly 800-page volume of her bestselling,

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“My trainer believes in me,” Remington Alabaster tells Serenata, his wife of 32 years. Until now he has been a reliable couch potato, she an equally predictable fitness maven.

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How many older women regret not doing things they've wanted to do in life?

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