Genre Fiction

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“Hornsby's vivid description of the Kansas bar would make Hemingway smile.”

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You like this character, she’s under your skin; you want to go on this journey with her. And then she says, “I’ve decided to die.” It’s only page 27.

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“the story Follett weaves grabs you from the start and holds you in its grip till the fairy tale ending.

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Daughters of the Wild has an intriguing, deeply marketable premise: oppressed and repressed girls, isolated from the outside world, “tending a mysterious plant called the Vine of Heaven” i

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Memorial is a deeply moving book by a young novelist with a unique voice and a strong sense of optimism.”

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“. . . supremely skilled writing even though the plot goes missing in action early on.”

This is an odd duck of a book, no question about it.

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How many who have been forced to deal with a life crisis can start over—and in a tropical setting, no less? Irene Steele’s life is turned upside down after learning  

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It is the end of August and Norah Ramsey, a single mom is raising her 15-year-old daughter, Violet in Raleigh, North Carolina. Norah, who is estranged from her mother Polly, hopes to make a better

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With everything going on in our world these days, chances are you’ve not thought much about the many difficult issues surrounding adoption.

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“A convoluted story of how justice will prevail, even if it takes an extraordinarily long time to do so.”

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What would you do if you were in a plane crash, but managed to survive? Being so close to death, it's only logical anyone would reassess their life.

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1986. Fulgencio Ramirez, a pharmacist in a border town called La Frontera, reads the obit section every morning, waiting for a man to die so he can move in and scoop up his wife.

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Miss Iceland is a beautiful novel about artistic aspiration and friendship. The storytelling sparkles . . .”

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“The Boy in the Field is a literary mystery novel. . . . Just not the kind that focuses on what happens on a patch of land, a highway, or even a country.

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“There is no question that Nemerever is a gifted writer. The rich style, precise in description and filled with witty metaphor, carries one along.”

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Beneficence, Meredith Hall’s first novel, appears 13 years after her prize-winning memoir Without a Map.

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“deeply evocative, eminently readable . . .”

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“A steady undercurrent of tension runs through The Frightened Ones as Suleima’s relationship with her inner world and the one around her are constantly on the point of fracturing.”

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The story of a hero seeking to return home is one of our earliest forms of literature—the obstacles that Odysseus faced on his journey back to Ithaca are etched in our collective mind.

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a great swashbuckler and ultimately a good read.”

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“The first day I ever gave a shit about soccer was September 4, 1979—the day that Mr. McMann showed up at Powell Park High.

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“The Hollow Ones is definitely recommended reading for everyone with a taste for occult detective fiction . . .”

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“Readers will find it as difficult to leave the characters in Remedios behind as they will find this haunting novel one they are grateful to not have missed.”

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“‘Murder him. . . . I can’t see any other way out,’ counsels Abbé Pierre as he hands Yvonne the lethal drug. . . . ‘You’ll grieve. You’ll mourn.

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Perhaps any novel that takes place largely in the minds of octogenarians and an arguably distraught—possibly disturbed—single mother may seem to wander over wide psychic territory.

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