Performing Arts

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While the history of the creative relationship between choreographer George Balanchine and impresario Lincoln Kirstein has been chronicled before in books on and by both subjects, James Steichen’s

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“Waleson’s reporting of the tumultuous history of NYCO is arts journalism at its best.

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There have been two excellent, lengthy biographies of director-choreographer Jerome Robbins: Deborah Jowitt’s Jerome Robbins and Amanda Vaill’s Somewhere: A Life of Jerome Robbins

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“Playing to the Gods is a useful entry into the careers and lives of these two extraordinary artists.”

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"Some stories are better than the books written about them and, sadly, this is one of them."

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On Sunday, May 21, 2017, the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus gave their final “Greatest Show on Earth” performance in Uniondale, NY.

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This account of the rise of punk in East Germany is openly the work of a devoted fan of that scene. Tim Mohr is upfront about his emotional investment in the topic.

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“an unsettling resonance that more triumphantly framed survivor stories rarely achieve.”

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By all appearances, the Bernsteins were a loving family.

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A dream come true. This is what Frank Verlizzo, aka Fraver, has been living.

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“[a] well-written memoir.”

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Laura Jacobs’ Celestial Bodies: How to Look at Dance delves into the lasting appeal of classical ballets like Giselle, La Sylphide, Sleeping Beauty, Swan Lake, and, of course,

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Bob Fosse was a choreographic creative force of nature who invented his own dance genre that changed American musical theater in his time and for generations of Broadway dancers to come.

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Gold Dust Woman, the unauthorized biography of pop music legend Stevie Nicks, can be read two ways.

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The Mudd Club was the Brigadoon of the late ’70s New York City music scene.

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Ink & Paint, The Women of Walt Disney’s Animation by Mindy Johnson corrects the misguided perception regarding women’s lack of contribution to the animation industry.

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Andrew Dickson is former arts editor at the Guardian, was at the 2012 Shakespeare festival at the Globe Theater in London highlighted by productions of Shakespeare from all over the world

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“. . . despite its failings, The Godfather Effect is generally engaging.

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“Nothing about Bringing the Body to the Stage and Screen is hasty or superficial. Author Lust offers the essences of the work in every page.

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“. . . with More Room in a Broken Heart, we hear the ballad of Carly, sung long and sultry, in a voice as crisp as a winter’s night. . . .

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“The nine short works are not all theater masterworks, but they are a fair representation of the spectrum of styles and subjects being examined by contemporary playwrights.”

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“Fundamentals of Theatrical Design hardly ever loses steam. . . .

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“. . . an acting book that is both valuable and informative. . . . a plethora of insights.”

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“Simply put, avid concertgoers will likely enjoy this book or throw up reading it—perhaps both.”

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“Sitting Pretty is filled with enough anecdotes to keep movie fans happy and intimate details enough for gossip fans as well.”

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