Political

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“In The Road Less Traveled, Zelikow brilliantly tells the diplomatic story of what he calls ‘the lost peace’ of August 1916–January 1917.”

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“a truly fresh look at one of the most chronicled figures in American history. Washington literally spent his entire life learning about politics and public service . . .”

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“As a chronicle of the decline of American liberalism from the time of Ted Kennedy’s birth at the dawn of the New Deal to the collapse of its ethic of activist government in the 1970s,

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“Fawcett displays an impressive knowledge of the thinkers and doers of . . . conservatism throughout modern history.”

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“should make everyone who reads it and was born after October 1962 extremely thankful to be alive . . .”

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“Demagogue is a beautifully written, richly researched tragedy, a morality tale in three acts.

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“Preston provides a highly readable, highly detailed account of the historic meetings and often difficult and contentious negotiations between Churchill, Roosevelt, Stalin, and their staffs

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“well laid out for the average reader wanting to understand how this new frozen conflict occurred . . .”

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“[An] insightful and penetrating study of the history of conservative nationalism in the United States.”

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[That] The Presidents makes a fast, engrossing read comes as no surprise . . . It works on so many levels including for a general audience.”

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Hal Brands and Charles Edsel, distinguished professors with real world experience in the US Department of State, present what they and others see as lessons drawn from the glory and demise of Athen

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“offers an excellent starting point for understanding how Putin intends to take on the world . . .”

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“If one ranks the American empire as the world’s most powerful, rivaled only by imperial Rome in its heyday, then for a brief moment, by the close of his time in office,” George H. W.

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Jay Sexton puts American history in a global perspective.

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At the time of his death in 1625, at age 55, James I of England had been already ill with several maladies of the time, but rumors immediately surfaced that he had been poisoned by George Villiers,

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This collection of short pieces by the British writer Martin Amis takes you into a wide range of his nonfiction work.

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“Matthews does an excellent job of pulling Bobby out from behind any family shadows to give us an in-depth portrait of what could have been.”

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"Despite the book's size, the complexity of its subject, and the narrative's variance with common public memory, it is a fast engaging read that corrects, even scatters, misconceptions."

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Brad Snyder’s new book The House of Truth is part intellectual history and part biography.

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Perry’s skewering of evolutionary rationales to explain and justify gender inequalities should keep us going for a while.”

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“. . . leaves no stone unturned in providing a taut narrative of this important era of modern European history . . .”

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Among historians certainly, it has been axiomatic that control of the authority and power of the Federal government was maintained by the so-called Southern plantation aristocracy for the first 75

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Since its 2015 publication, Ari Berman’s Give Us the Ballot has received near universal acclaim, including Notable or Best Book of the Year status from The New York Times, The

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“well-organized, splendidly written, and compelling . . .”

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