Politics

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“Fawcett displays an impressive knowledge of the thinkers and doers of . . . conservatism throughout modern history.”

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Systemic Corruption: Constitutional Ideas for An Anti-Oligarchic Republic’s merit lies in its intellectual energy that the reade

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“Brian Stalter’s book explores the perfidious relationship between the president of the United States and Fox News, an affiliation that explains much about the catastrophe of Trump’s term i

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Who is best suited to understand and explain the cynical marriage of convenience between Donald Trump and America’s white evangelicals—a critical outsider, or a sympathetic insider?

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Richard Haass, President of the Council on Foreign Relations, provides the reader with a comprehensive analysis of our world—a valuable guide for every alert citizen as well as for scholars and stu

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“When you’re president, you can do anything.” This slogan, adapted by David Leonhardt (New York Times, February 3, 2020) from Trump’s claim about getting his way with women thanks to his T

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“Donald Trump appears to conceive politics like business and sex—a combat zone contesting personal power, with winning the only pleasure.” 

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“[An] insightful and penetrating study of the history of conservative nationalism in the United States.”

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“In Me the People, Nadia Urbinati has produced an exceptional scholarly work on a highly relevant socio-political phenomenon.”

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“Jennifer Silva serves as much as an academic scholar as a personal therapist, and a reader has to ask how she could endure the endless suffering experienced by her all-too-honest subjects.

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“Cracks in the Ivory Tower is a sometimes harsh, but honest indictment of the current state of higher education in the U.S.  It should be required reading for ever

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“Trying to divine and react to an assertive China’s intentions and capabilities will be the critical national security challenge for the U.S. this century. . . .

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Leadership and the Rise of Great Powers gives morality an explanatory role. In international politics “moral actions help [a rising power] to establish a degree of credibility . . .

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By usual publishing standards, this new edition of a 1971 book shouldn’t exist and shouldn’t be relevant today.

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“While much is known about the two successful accidentals, Roosevelt and Truman, and the partially-successful Lyndon, the latter Johnson, much of the book’s treasure lies in earlier, lesser

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“One can only imagine what the publication of Commander in Cheat will produce on the president’s Twitter feed.

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Hal Brands and Charles Edsel, distinguished professors with real world experience in the US Department of State, present what they and others see as lessons drawn from the glory and demise of Athen

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“Friedman’s account of the Arab Section is an eye-opening narrative of the early days of the State of Israel. It is not an optimistic story, but a genuine and sorrowful one.”

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“Does an excellent job of describing Debs’ life and work, his passion and purpose.”

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“Camelot’s End thoroughly examines not just the primary campaigns of Carter and Kennedy, but also the human frailties that combined with events to wreck both men’s

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Identity is an important contribution to the conversation on this timely and important topic.

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“Holtzman is courageous in writing this book. It certainly won’t win her a White House invitation to the Christmas Party.

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The theory of the case made by attorney, curatorial journalist, and professor Seth Abramson is that Donald Trump and a core group of 10 to 20 aides, associates, and allies conspired with a hostile

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Jay Sexton puts American history in a global perspective.

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