Series

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Innovative British author Anthony Horowitz is up to his usual intertextual antics in A Line to Kill, a sequel to The Word Is Murder and The Sentence Is Death.

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“Among today’s abundant crime novels, it’s rare to find one that demands a second reading for its language and insight.

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“A new Longmire novel is always a welcome treat, and Daughter of the Morning Star is another slam-dunk.”

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“Similar in pace and tenderness to the Ladies’ Detective Agency mysteries of Alexander McCall Smith, this mystery fits neatly into the traditional mold, providing an enjoyable read that’s i

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“a fascinating novel, filled with facts about life in the fin-de-siècle of the Victorian Era, of the niche of women during that time, social comme

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An echo of Stephen King’s The Stand. A flash of James Dickey’s Deliverance.

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“By all means, don’t hesitate—grab Dark Sky and don’t put it down until it’s done.”

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“Those who value similar portrayals of place as character—as in Louise Penny’s Three Pines, for instance—will treasure A Fatal Lie and its Welsh backdrop.”

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“Patterson is a better writer than this, and it is hard to say if he is mentoring a writer new to the series, or not, but The Russian is a disappointment.”

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“What’s perhaps most remarkable about Blood Grove—as with all Easy Rawlins novels—is Mosley’s undiminished gift for embedding the poignant messaging of the protest novel in hard-bo

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This is the latest in Akashic Books city noir series set in Africa. The 13 stories visit various locations in Accra, all of which show the poverty but hope of the people who survive there.

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In some literary circles, describing a novel as “light reading” can be taken as a slur. Not so with this one.

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“Prodigal Son is further proof that Gregg Hurwitz has cornered the market on first-rate thrillers.”

Evan Smoak is out.

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“Kellerman’s writing frames deep tenderness among her characters very well.

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“With the history of a centuries’ old nursery rhyme as its starting point, it’s the best Bryan and May mystery by far.”

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“Nick Petrie keeps it all moving, with all the balls in the air, so there isn’t really time for disbelief—just for the next weapon and defensive maneuver, with an edge of self-sacrifice.”

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A Lady Compromised is a complex, enthralling mystery that rivals those of Anne Perry and Agatha Christie.”

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“Whether you’re drawn to Watch Her for the high-fidelity Boston setting, with its contrasts of gritty working-class life and cultured wealth, or for the dramatic and classic intera

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The two women provide a welcome humorous touch as they guide us through their world.”

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Lazarus is a thriller par excellence, though it’s advisable to read it in small increments, for the accumulation of too much horror at o

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“Mma Ramotswe and her allies practice that love of land and courtesy to each other in gently amusing ways that eventually resolve the mysteries, potential crimes, and tensions of their live

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“Moonflower Murders will be either adored or dreaded by readers, with no middle ground.

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“Frear’s writing has the sharp dark tang that Tana French exhibits, and she updates the British crime narrative to the dangerous conflicts of loyalty that Stuart Neville paints best, with t

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“Connelly spins a story in which the risk is life itself, and the collateral damage may be integrity.

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“Grisham has a knack for throwing curves into the story that, with any other writer, could be distracting, but with Grisham every curve is woven into the story and builds the tension throug

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