Series

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“Herron’s plot is packed with twists and delightfully sardonic conversations, and the book’s only major flaw is that at some point it ends and one must resume normal life.”

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“One of Vic’s friends makes a comment near the end that sums up why this investigator finds her work worth the effort: Max comments, ‘If everyone sat at home watching Netflix, we’d never ha

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“This fine traditional L.A. crime novel with its Jewish flavor and its quandaries of the elderly provides enjoyable entertainment.”

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“The Lightning Rod will suit readers of James Patterson, Stuart Woods, Hank Phillippi Ryan, and John Gilstrap.

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“Highly recommended for Spenser fans and any reader who enjoys witty dialogue, detective fiction, or contemporary themes.”

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“Cates provides a story that moves along at a good pace while educating the reader on all thing’s witchery.”

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“Kudos to Patterson for creating yet another exciting chapter in the Alex Cross saga.”

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Fans of Lynne Truss may find her newest mystery, Psycho by the Sea, both entertaining and amusing. But not so much for anyone who has not read her work before.

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“From the first page, As the Wicked Watch, told in first person through the eyes of Jordan Manning, straps readers in and takes them on a breathless and bumpy ‘whodunit’ ride that

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Innovative British author Anthony Horowitz is up to his usual intertextual antics in A Line to Kill, a sequel to The Word Is Murder and The Sentence Is Death.

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“Among today’s abundant crime novels, it’s rare to find one that demands a second reading for its language and insight.

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“A new Longmire novel is always a welcome treat, and Daughter of the Morning Star is another slam-dunk.”

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“Similar in pace and tenderness to the Ladies’ Detective Agency mysteries of Alexander McCall Smith, this mystery fits neatly into the traditional mold, providing an enjoyable read that’s i

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“a fascinating novel, filled with facts about life in the fin-de-siècle of the Victorian Era, of the niche of women during that time, social comme

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An echo of Stephen King’s The Stand. A flash of James Dickey’s Deliverance.

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“By all means, don’t hesitate—grab Dark Sky and don’t put it down until it’s done.”

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“Those who value similar portrayals of place as character—as in Louise Penny’s Three Pines, for instance—will treasure A Fatal Lie and its Welsh backdrop.”

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“Patterson is a better writer than this, and it is hard to say if he is mentoring a writer new to the series, or not, but The Russian is a disappointment.”

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“What’s perhaps most remarkable about Blood Grove—as with all Easy Rawlins novels—is Mosley’s undiminished gift for embedding the poignant messaging of the protest novel in hard-bo

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This is the latest in Akashic Books city noir series set in Africa. The 13 stories visit various locations in Accra, all of which show the poverty but hope of the people who survive there.

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In some literary circles, describing a novel as “light reading” can be taken as a slur. Not so with this one.

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“Prodigal Son is further proof that Gregg Hurwitz has cornered the market on first-rate thrillers.”

Evan Smoak is out.

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“Kellerman’s writing frames deep tenderness among her characters very well.

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“Nick Petrie keeps it all moving, with all the balls in the air, so there isn’t really time for disbelief—just for the next weapon and defensive maneuver, with an edge of self-sacrifice.”

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“With the history of a centuries’ old nursery rhyme as its starting point, it’s the best Bryan and May mystery by far.”

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