International & World Politics

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This is a book about a global shock that took Washington and most of Europe by surprise: the sharp revival of superpower conflict.

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The World That Wasn’t paints a convincing portrait of a gullible, flip-flopping fool that does little to explain Henry Wallace’s importance to FDR’s New Deal or progressives’ endu

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The 400-year-old relationship between China and Russia could best be summarized as incessant "frenemies"—sometimes allies, sometimes adversaries, but always in flux as the relative power between th

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“Meltzer and Mensch, in The Nazi Conspiracy: The Secret Plot to Kill Roosevelt, Stalin, and Churchill, give history a sheen of drama that it deserves while leaving the reader much

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“provides a great deal of background and context to help the reader understand how Putin’s Russia came to believe it could impose its will on Ukraine in a lightning campaign, a mistaken not

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The author is a scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the former editor of Foreign Policy.

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Putin’s Trolls is a terrifying analysis of evil—how Russian authorities have mobilized social media and other forms of hybrid warfare to exploit human frailties to foster Kremlin ambitions

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“Preston provides a highly readable, highly detailed account of the historic meetings and often difficult and contentious negotiations between Churchill, Roosevelt, Stalin, and their staffs

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lucid and very depressing assessment of the current state of what some Canadians term, the Excited States of America.”

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“Granted that democracy is always a work in progress, if democracy again shines in the United States, its broad appeal can bolster demands for democracy in China.”

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“In Me the People, Nadia Urbinati has produced an exceptional scholarly work on a highly relevant socio-political phenomenon.”

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“If people read An Impossible Dream: Reagan, Gorbachev, and a World Without the Bomb and gather its deeper lessons, perhaps the race to Armageddon can be slowed if not stopped and

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“This is a book rich in detail. Its tone is neutral. It doesn’t give the impression that the author wishes to see the CIA abolished, merely controlled.”

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“offers an excellent starting point for understanding how Putin intends to take on the world . . .”

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“for anyone interested in understanding the shocking manner in which the rights of the Palestinians, along with international law, have been violated for decades, all with U.S.

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“a valuable resource for understanding the lack of military effectiveness of Arab armies, along with a dour outlook on any expectation of improvement in the current political and cultural e

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“The scholars of international affairs must be cautious in accepting the rhetoric of Chinese policymakers couched in morality. . . .

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“Fences and walls are not necessary. Mostly they are manifestations of superficial thinking.”

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The summer before he started college, former senator and Secretary of State John Kerry sailed on a yacht with then-President Kennedy and his family.

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Every so often in this unusual and uneven book, a phrase or a scene makes a sudden unexpected connection between past and present, like the spark when an electric current flashes across a gap betwe

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This is the largely untold story of French commandos during WWII, led by an aristocrat from a famous family who was trained by the British spy office called Special Operative Executive (SOE).

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Short story collections often give readers a taste of a writer’s style, preoccupations, and a sense of whether the reader will enjoy an author’s longer works of fiction.

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