Biography, Autobiography & Memoir

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As the book’s subtitle indicates, Camera Man is not a conventional birth-to-death narrative of the life of Buster Keaton.

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“To read Taste Makers: Seven Immigrant Women Who Revolutionized Food in America is to witness a conversation about these women journeys as immigrants, chefs, teachers, and entrepre

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“‘I dedicate this book to everyone who helped create its contents in any way, including the assholes.’”

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“a workmanlike portrait of Chekhov, useful for the general reader curious to learn more about this master of Russian literature . . .”

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Lost in the Valley of Death is a disturbing book that leaves you with a sense of wonder and a sense of unease. It’s a book that is not easy to put down.”

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This is an unusual book because, in almost every way, it is a sequel to a documentary film. Without that film, there’d be no book.

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In her most recent collection of essays, Siri Hustvedt provides a feminist analysis of a range of materials drawn from her own family life (particularly the intimate relationships with her grandmot

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“Schickel’s prose and her story are brutal even as they are compassionate, raw even as they are elegant, hopeful even as they are tragic.”

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“Daly’s research and vibrant writing provide the reader with a clear understanding, especially through the two men he selected to honor, of what police work is supposed to be.”

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“this small volume offers a fascinating and remarkable story of one man’s love of sport, devotion to a team, and how that saves his life.”

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“The redeeming power of Freedman’s book is that it allows his fans to be exposed one more time to Cohen’s incredible personality and intelligence and, for that reason, the book is a success

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“Like a foray into the heartbeat of a widely beloved author, These Precious Days by Ann Patchett is a powerful essay collection, wonderfully executed and deeply human.”

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“Poller’s Aldous Huxley offers readers a clear, thorough guide to Huxley’s metaphysical thought and the process through which it evolved over the course of his career as a writer.”

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“Gottlieb’s deeply affecting book is a loving tribute to a great Swedish-American actress—an absolutely must-read for Garbo freaks.”

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While recovering from a serious stroke in 1995, British author, critic, and editor Robert McCrum found that the only words that made sense to him were bits of Shakespeare.

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“. . . essential for anyone wanting to know who Magritte was, as a person, a painter, and a thinker.”

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“Applegate’s well written and exhaustively researched biography of Polly Adler offers unique insight into a remarkable immigrant as well as the Roaring ’20s.”

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“In her quiet, humble way, Goodall and her co-author have masterminded a full-bore assault on the cynicism, emotional exhaustion, and despair of living in a world in the throes of climate c

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“provides a more nuanced picture of an almost tragic figure trying to bridge the old and new political order between representative democracy and the oligarchy of the English nobility.”

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The Writer’s Crusade is an important consideration of Kurt Vonnegut and the legacy of Slaughterhouse-Five.”

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“For sheer reading and reflecting pleasure, These Precious Days is a treasure.”

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“Gayle Jessup White writes a candid and personal memoir that includes finding the legacy of President Thomas Jefferson and the author’s racial self-identity in the process.”

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Red Roulette could be one of the most interesting and—at bottom—saddest books you will ever encounter.

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