Biography, Autobiography & Memoir

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“It is hard to imagine a reader who would not be inspired by the momentous life of Heda Margolius depicted in Hitler, Stalin and I.

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This beautiful and horrifying memoir should be required reading by anyone who feels that immigration is the nation’s number one issue right now.

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As one cannot truly categorize poet Clyde Sanborn (1948-1996), neither can one neatly classify this text about his life and writing.

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If you keep up with American politics, then you almost certainly know who James O’Keefe is.

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Katja Petrowskaja has indeed, as her publicist claims, written an “inventive and unique literary debut” as she travels to various countries in search of her family’s dramatic 20th century history.

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If you work with children, The Deepest Well: Healing the Long-Term Effects of Childhood Adversity by Nadine Burke Harris MD may be the most important book you read this year.

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William C. Rempel faced significant challenges in writing a biography of Kirk Kerkorian, the obsessively private tycoon.

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“The Wizard and the Prophet shows that even the ‘latest’ ideas on creation and energy have origins in the modern beginnings of the environmental movement.”

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Born and raised in India, Shoba Narayan left for college in the U.S. and stayed for the next 20 years.

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“I looked at my plate and thought quite honestly that the mixture of vegetable, millet and meat looked very enticing.”

“’That’s human flesh,’ she whispered.

“’What?’

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The Vietnam War was one of the most tragic and divisive events in the history of this country.

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Laurie Gwen Shapiro’s The Stowaway is the adventure of Billy Gawronski, a first-generation Polish-American living in Bayside, New York, who on the day of his graduation from high school at

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“From the first page to the last, readers are enmeshed in a beguiling story of government intrigue, criminal cunning, FBI backstabbing, and foreign covert shenanigans.”

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On first blush, it would be easy to think this memoir is a cheap attempt to cash in on what is really a very common problem in America—our addiction to online porn that is said to be ruining young

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Playing with Fire: The 1968 Election and the Transformation of American Politics is an important and informative book that becomes more and more amazing as it progresses.

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One of the great rallying cries of politics in the 21st century is anxiety over rising income inequality.

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Contemporary readers probably won’t recognize the name Edward Garnett, not unless they’re students and scholars of modern British literature.

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“It's All Relative uses humor to discuss sex, paternity, hereditary organizations, privacy, twins, black sheep, evolution, and the import

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"a comprehensive biography befitting a giant of the literature of the United States.."

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"Sigmund tells his story in a way that engages and educates but never bores the reader. His easy prose explains why philosophy is important . . ."

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“Matthews does an excellent job of pulling Bobby out from behind any family shadows to give us an in-depth portrait of what could have been.”

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Ever since April 30, 1945, the spirit of Adolf Hitler has floated across the minds of Western Europeans and North Americans like a vampiric miasma—a perennial threat that is often invoked whenever

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She is a self-taught journalist, a natural detective, a Good Samaritan, and a woman with a mission. Her name is Gladys Kalibbala but the kids she saves call her Mommy or Auntie Gladys.

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Whether one is pro- or anti-Russia, or supports or disdains Putin, this book will be a fascinating read.”

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Historians and academics always face the challenge of balancing biography with what T. S. Eliot called “those vast impersonal forces” that hold us in their grip and shape history.

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