Biography, Autobiography & Memoir

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“At exactly fifteen minutes past eight in the morning, on August 6, 1945, at the moment when the atomic bomb flashed above Hiroshima, Miss Toshiko Sasaki, a clerk in the personnel department of the

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“Abramsky offers a fascinating portrait of the life of this forgotten sports heroine in fluid prose.”

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“Eliot Ness and The Mad Butcher is an excellent biography that reads like a thriller and stands on its own, distinct from its predecessor.”

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“Regardless of one’s political beliefs, Still Standing is a good read with a fast pace; it’s informative, at times humorous, and tells the story of a man who is willing to recogniz

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Start Oliver Stone’s extravagant autobiography by reading the “contents” that lists ten chapters, including “Downfall,” “Waiting for the Miracle,” “South of the Border” and “Top of the World.”

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“. . . this book is a remarkably compassionate story of emotional family horror from which neither uncle nor niece could easily escape.”

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French composer Francis Poulenc was one of the famed vanguard composers of Les Six and a bon vivant who enjoyed celebrity but privately suffered bouts of depression and self-doubt, all of which inf

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“Butch Cassidy is a fast read, and Leerhsen’s writing style is engaging and believable—a good way to spend a quiet weekend and learn the truth about the Old West.”

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When Berta Cáceres was assassinated in her home in the middle of the night on March 2, 2016, it was a major international news story, as coverage of Honduras goes.

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“Demagogue is a beautifully written, richly researched tragedy, a morality tale in three acts.

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For James Baldwin, “what kind of human beings we aspired to be” matters more than policy and power.  On this, he was “absolutely right”, according to Eddie Glaude Jr.

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“She ties it tight. It takes a while to find a vein. She can’t use her arms anymore, her veins have collapsed. But at the back of the knee, she still has one that lights up for her.

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According to Jorge Castañeda, it is “as if the United states seeks to challenge foreign writers to explain it, confident they will fail.” His own attempt is for US citizens, not foreigners, at a “c

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For novelists, filmmakers, and writers of popular history, Shanghai in the years between the two world wars is irresistible.

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Heather Lende offers a down-to-earth account of life in local politics in her fourth book set in Haines, her small Alaska town.

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According to Victor Hugo, a barbarian of civilization is preferable to a civilized barbarian. Alaric the Goth was supposedly the former.

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Welcome to the “Rashomon effect” in politics inside the Beltway!

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Auschwitz, Buckenwald, Bergen-Belsen: the names are familiar to readers who have taken an interest in the German concentration camps that operated from the mid-1930s until 1945, when Russian soldie

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By this time, everyone should have at least some passing familiarity with the atrocities committed by the Nazi regime of Adolf Hitler as well as the postwar legal proceedings in Nuremberg which wer

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The unifying thread in this thoughtful collection is being foreign in Palestine: Ajnabi or ajnabiya in Arabic.

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“Regardless of one’s knowledge of any of the 50 writers discussed, Cult Writers is intriguing and informative.”

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People never disappoint, at least in terms of how complicated their lives are and what they might reveal if we listen closely enough.

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“Behind every great fortune,” observed the 19th century French novelist Honoré de Balzac, “lies a great crime.”

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Alysia Li Ying Sawchyn taught students about “ethnicity, gender, sexuality, ability, class, age” but not mental illness. She is a person of color and a woman. This the students can see.

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