Biography, Autobiography & Memoir

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“Fare Thee Well is a passionate and well-written exposé of the behind the scenes action of one of rock and roll’s most iconic bands . . .”

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“Goodbye, Sweet Girl, bursting with such heartfelt, beautifully crafted scenes, is a gift for those who’ve experienced the pain of growing up and out of abusive re

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“Told simply and well, Iftin’s story explains the incredible bravery and hope necessary to live in the crosshairs of war and to find a way out.”

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History of Violence is not, as the title suggests, a big, fat tome about human aggression, brute force, and cruelty, though it describes a world in which violence shapes the life of the na

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“a voyeuristic journey of discovery that is riveting and unforgettable.”

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“a beautifully written, thoroughly researched tale of family, friends, and history. It is an easy read, with humor, pathos . . .”

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Keith Hernandez played first base better than anyone of the late 1970s and ’80s.

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In the fall of 1948 Ernest Hemingway and his fourth wife Mary traveled to Europe, staying in Venice for a few months.

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“Alone time gives us permission to pause, to relish the sensual details of the world rather than hurtling through museums and uploading photos to Instagram.”

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“an entertaining, sad story, and one that will give the reader much to think about.”

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Why do some people see a dress as white and gold, while others insist the same dress is blue and black? You remember The Dress, right?

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“If you care anything about journalism as it was practiced before the age of the Internet, it’s a must read.”

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Greg LeMond was a kid from outside Reno, NV, who joined an elite cycling team in France and went on to unseat Europe’s reigning champions in the sport.

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“The long collective hatred of blackness, the calculated policing of sexual difference, the intentional ghettoization of urban centers, and the lure of the American dollar are just a few of the str

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“leaves behind a legacy as one of the Army’s most influential innovators . . .”

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Statesmen . . . should be judged not by the purity of their ideals and intentions, but by the consequences of their actions and policies.”

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Salvador Dali wasn’t the founder of Surrealism, the cultural movement that spread from Europe to the Americas in the 20thcentury. Andre Breton was the founding father.

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It’s often said there’s something “ineffable” about the nature of one’s mind on LSD, magic mushrooms, or other psychedelic plants or drugs.

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"Hollywood makes movies about battles, helicopters, and daring escapes in the Vietnam War.

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It bears repeating that personal accounts and oral histories are important for a variety of reasons.

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“reaffirms the reality of international politics that no resolution is ever permanent; no victory is ever final.”

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There is no question that Robin, the new biography by culture reporter David Itzkoff, is comprehensive and well researched, a tour de force about the life of comedian Robin Williams.

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“this book should become a fixture in the library of any baseball player or coach.”

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Paul Simon: The Life is not an autobiography but it might as well be. Simon sat for more than 100 hours of interviews with respected writer Robert Hilburn and made it possible for Hilburn

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For weal or woe, many names stand out in the history of our revolution against Great Britain: Nathan Hale, George Washington, Benedict Arnold, and Ethan Allen, for example.

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