Architecture

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It’s hard to imagine how a relatively short time span could have a far reaching artistic or historic impact. But the fact is that this phenomenon is quite common in our modern art era.

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Reviewers can’t seem to get enough of Middleton’s Double Vision.

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"Martin Kemp takes us on this great personal journey of adventure in exploring the art of Leonardo, and we are so much the better for it."

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The crescendo for Duncan Hannah’s Twentieth-Century Boy takes place in February 1976, more than 100 pages before the end, and four years before the legendary 1980 Times Square Show when hi

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Carrie Boretz’s Street is not just another collection of New York City photographs.

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" . . .  new light on the diversity of Wright’s creative genius as a socially conscious architect, planner, and inventor."

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Every generation spawns a handful of academics who become public intellectual rock stars resonating across a broad swath of social concerns far beyond their specific specializations.

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“A corrective look at Leonardo’s first 27 professional years when he was snubbed, struggled, and departed Florence thwarted and penniless.”

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"are buildings extensions of us . . . or are we extensions of them?"

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“They paved paradise and they put up a parking lot.”
—Joni Mitchell, 1970

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“Beyond New York, the High Line has gone viral. From Seoul to Mexico City, cities worldwide have rushed to turn obsolete infrastructure into public space.”

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Gerard Koeppel's City on a Grid: How New York Became New York is a fascinating and curious story that takes us back through time to the early beginnings of the city called Nieuw Amsterdam

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“In sum, Radical Cities offers a rich buffet of inspiring sketches of imaginative approaches to improving quality of life in more livable settlements.

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Sometimes “woulda, coulda, shoulda” reflections of what might have been concern the most trivial of topics, while on other occasions these reflections concern the most momentous, even majestic of d

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“. . . a valuable textbook that has arrived in the nick of time.”

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“A must read for anyone and interested in places and how they affect all parts of our lives and cultures. The Greatest Grid calls the reader to browse randomly.

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“Whether you experience Tenryu-ji in person or through the pages of the book, you will learn to understand the enduring appeal of Japanese gardens and will take away a lot more than photogr

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“. . . the wise reader will tough it out, because taken as a complete work, the story that these 40 anecdotes tell is captivating.

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What does it take to make a place lively, a code word for appealing, competitive, sustainable? What choices should those who have leadership responsibility for place stewardship make?

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