History

Reviewed by: 

In his timely and necessary The Third Reconstruction, Peniel Joseph has written a book with the power to engender the same consuming and transforming passion that

Reviewed by: 

Ancestors and forerunners show up in the annals of American literature more often than readers imagine.

Reviewed by: 

Caroline Johnson, an artist who met Lincoln said, “Mr. President I believe God has hewn you out of rock, for this great and mighty purpose.

Reviewed by: 

“Colorization teems with great stories of Black cinematic struggles and triumphs that bring a century of Hollywood outrages and inroads vividly and fearle

Reviewed by: 

“High school students should be especially eager to read this history, a sense of 1700s America they won’t find in their textbooks.”

Reviewed by: 

In February of 1969, Duke University was on the cusp of national prominence, about to eclipse Emory and Vanderbilt as the South’s premier institution of higher learning and preparing what would be

Reviewed by: 

Natalie Baszile first caught a whiff of fame with her novel, Queen Sugar, that was adapted for TV and co-produced by Ava DuVernay and Oprah Winfrey.

Reviewed by: 

“Our Team gloriously chronicles the excruciating birth pains and exhilarating triumph of a ballclub that played an undervalued but coequal role in challenging major league baseball's instit

Reviewed by: 

“In Gates’ capable hands The Black Church is a stirring story, told with compassion, respect, and not a little awe.”

Reviewed by: 

American history is “littered with utopian experiments that began with giddy promise and ended in depressing failure,” writes Thomas Healy. In Soul City, he tells one such story.

Reviewed by: 

“The slave trade persisted in New York in the decades before the Civil War because

the city was the capital of the Southern slave economy.”

Reviewed by: 

“chronicles the century-long struggle following the Civil War by Black Americans and other people of color for true civil and social rights, particularly the right to engage in interracial—

Reviewed by: 

A Fool’s Errand by Lonnie Bunch III is a literary combo. It’s a book about a man, a building, and a race. This is a book that needed to be written.

Reviewed by: 

“Nicholas Buccola’s captivating new book, The Fire Is Upon Us: James Baldwin, William F. Buckley Jr.

Reviewed by: 

“In documenting this country’s fateful journey from slavery through thwarted Reconstruction to segregation, Luxenberg paints on a broad canvas, elegantly narrating several captivating and s

Reviewed by: 

Emmett Till’s murder was the “first great media event of the Civil Rights movement.” Let the People See: The Story of Emmett Till provides new detail: the family, the trial, and o

Reviewed by: 

In “The Accidental Rebel,” an op-ed published in The New York Times on the 40th anniversary of the Columbia student uprising of 1968, novelist Paul Auster (Columbia ’69) asserted that stud

Reviewed by: 

“An American Quilt [is] nothing less than a reexamination of American history through the lens of race, class, and gender.”

Reviewed by: 

Anthropologist/folklorist/journalist Zora Neale Hurston used her polyvalent talent to produce the only recorded Trans-Atlantic slave narrative based on extensive interviews with Kossula, or Cudjo L

Reviewed by: 

“Gordon argues that the Klan represents how some of the most primitive political passions are rooted in fear and hatred of otherness—and a willingness to exploit these sentiments for purpos

Reviewed by: 

"Read this book. Do not wait until some modern Buffalo Bill makes this story into another epic movie about the West's greatest show!"

Pages