Biography, Autobiography & Memoir

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In the late 1970s and early 1980s, a cadre of freewheeling, Southern pot smugglers lived at the crossroads of “Miami Vice” and a Jimmy Buffett song.

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A Bosnian woman once asked author Eric Greitens “Why don’t you do anything?” At the moment, the question led to a frustrating conversation; Mr.

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Here, at the beginning of the 21st century, Noah Webster is an often overlooked fixture of American culture to a modern audience.

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I first met Czeslaw Milosz’s work as an undergraduate, majoring in history with an emphasis on Russia and Eastern Europe.

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There has not been a definitive biography on Mahatma Gandhi for many years.

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The second thing that the reader finds surprising about Christina Haag’s memoir Come to the Edge is how well written it is.

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This book can be summed up in four words: It’s excellent. Read it.

If you need more details before opening the cover . . .

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“I’m not a businessman—I’m a business, man” is the reoccurring theme of this book.

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When Professor X decides to enter into the great American dream of home ownership, he, in possession of a MFA, turns to part-time work as an adjunct professor at two community colleges to help make

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From the photo on the cover—(taken by his father Joe with a 616 Kodak box camera) of young Davis hugging a teddy bear—to the strings of hilarious and touching stories, Donald Davis takes us on a jo

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If you or family members are contemplating a trip to Mexico you may want to rethink your plans.

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“What are you doing without your scarf?”

“Where are you coming from?” the Talib shouted. “Who is your mabram? Where is he? Show him to me.”

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Picture a league full of pro players, several from the United States and the rest from Canada, the Dominican Republic, Colombia, New Zealand, Japan, Australia, and the Ukraine—all playing on a base

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The first big laugh in Judi Dench’s highly enjoyable memoir And Furthermore is a visual joke on page one, where the reader is presented with a black and white picture of a group of very yo

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What is it about New Yorkers that makes them so interesting? (Or what makes New Yorkers believe they are so interesting?)

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What happens when your parents abruptly (through the eyes of a 12 year old) divorce and leave you to fend for yourself for an entire summer, alone in the house with your 17-year-old brother while t

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This tale about the real life founders of two of the greatest cosmetic companies was pregnant with possibilities of great gossip and fascinating, untold historical facts.

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A reader often selects a book because of an affinity for the author, word of mouth, or an interest in the subject—only to meander through the pages to discover that, for whatever reason, it was not

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Good biographies accomplish two things.

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In this first of four volumes, the editors present a chorus of contemporary voices to give the reader an unusual portrait of the Civil War.

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The press release for this book reads “fairy tale and haute couture mix charmingly in this re-imagined story. . . .” Believe it or not, there is not one word of hyperbole in that description.

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Bird Cloud, Annie Proulx’s memoir-cum-construction diary is an amuse-bouche of a book, a lovely nibble of a thing, that has, strangely, been inserted somewhere deep in the rich, dense feas

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You need only two ingredients to create a worthwhile memoir: an intriguing life story and the writing skills to convey that story evocatively.

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