Vinton Rafe McCabe

Vinton Rafe McCabe brings to New York Journal of Books more than three decades of experience in both print and electronic media.

He is the past Arts Editor for the Advocate newspapers of CT and MA and a former producer/host for PBS in New England. He worked as a restaurant critic and feature writer for New England Monthly, and a theater and book critic for the PBS series “Artsweek.”

Mr. McCabe’s freelance work has appeared in such diverse publications as The New York Times, The Stamford Advocate, Corpus Christi magazine, and NY Journal of Books. His is a familiar radio voice in the state of Connecticut as well; he hosted a talk radio show broadcast from station WGCH in Greenwich.

Mr. McCabe is a published novelist, a produced playwright, and an award-winning poet.

An advocate for holistic healthcare, Mr. McCabe is the author of eight books on homeopathy and related subjects. His nonfiction books include the now-standard text, Practical Homeopathy, as well as his most recent nonfiction work, The Healing Echo.

He is now also a first time novelist whose Death in Venice, California was published by The Permanent Press in 2014.

 

Book Reviews by Vinton Rafe McCabe

Reviewed by: 

“in a volume that runs for some 600 pages, not a single word seems wasted, not a sentence seems too long.” 

Reviewed by: 

“Joni: The Joni Mitchell Sessions is populated by myriad photographs of Joni Mitchell—Joni singing, Joni gesticulating, Joni posing, Joni mugging, even Joni swimmi

Reviewed by: 

“Uneven as it is, Family Trust need not be compared to Crazy Rich Asians in order to find an audience.

Reviewed by: 

“Philosophy for the functionally illiterate.”

Reviewed by: 

In the September 26, 2002, issue of The New York Review of Books, in an article rather marvelously entitled “The Queen of Quinkdom,” Margaret Atwood tackled Ursula K. Le Guin.

Reviewed by: 

Was it only seven years ago when self-referenced “veteran entertainment reporter” Sam Kashner teamed with biographer Nancy Schoenberger to produce that rock-’em, sock-’em tome Furious Love: Eli

Reviewed by: 

While it seems to be universally the case that authors would rather have their books written about than not, it is also the case that it is sometimes better not to review a given book than to revie

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Although the reader has more than once felt as if a given Hollywood biography produced by Blood Moon Productions ought to have opened with the familiar phrase “Once Upon a Time,” he nonetheless has

Reviewed by: 

"The big surprise about David Sedaris’s new book, Theft by Finding: Diaries (1977–2002), is how very good it is."

Reviewed by: 

“there ought to have been more to Less than the sum of its parts.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Spoonbenders is a ripe peach. Something you yearn for.

Reviewed by: 

“The stories in the volume are all worthy—some extraordinary.”

Reviewed by: 

In her brilliant 1977 one-woman Broadway show entitled On Stage, Lily Tomlin performed a bit in which middle-aged married couple Lud and Marie discussed a cake that they had eaten, endless

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

It’s become something of a cottage industry for publishers in recent times to take an address that a noted personage gives to a respected college or university and slap it between hard covers to se

Reviewed by: 

Before the book is even opened, Nevertheless, the new memoir by Trump manqué Alec Baldwin has much to tell us.

Reviewed by: 

“one of the best books to come out in many months.”

Reviewed by: 

Given his past works like the intricate and, let us say, expansive novel American Gods and his groundbreaking comic book, The Sandman, that helped define the nature of the graphic

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Ellen Klages is an author with a true talent for storytelling and an eye for the beautiful detail.”

Reviewed by: 

“there is a good deal to get excited about in pondering the future work of Chanelle Benz.”

Reviewed by: 

Enigma Variations, the new novel by Andre Aciman, who previously presented us with that peach of a tale, Call Me By Your Name, has been packaged strangely.

Reviewed by: 

A curious word comes to mind in describing Margaret Atwood’s new novel Hag-Seed.

That word is effective.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

If all of Garrison Keillor’s reports from Lake Wobegon were strung end to end, the result would be something remarkably similar to The Whole Town’s Talking, Fannie Flagg’s latest novel.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Rita Mae Brown’s latest novel Cakewalk elicits from the reader a certain WTF response.

Reviewed by: 

“Emer O’Sullivan’s The Fall of the House of Wilde: Oscar Wilde and His Family seems the Oscar.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

There’s a certain poetry of loneliness at work in Martin Hyatt’s new novel Beautiful Gravity.

Reviewed by: 

He’s a charmer, that Alan Cumming. Actor, author, provocateur. Amateur photographer, whose zeal for the art sort of makes up for the resultant photographic images.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

An anecdote about the Bizarro poet and novelist Charles Bukowski opens the new book by (self appointed?) “star blogger” Mark Manson, The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck: A Counterintuitive Appr

Reviewed by: 

Donald Bogle’s new hybrid biography, Elizabeth and Michael: The Queen of Hollywood and The King of Pop—A Love Story, sort of sets up a web of lies in the first three words of its title.

Reviewed by: 

Yuge!, Garry Trudeau’s new compilation of strips from the juggernaut that is Doonesbury, is ideal for those who feel that they have not, over the past few months, gotten their fil

Reviewed by: 

“While the reader can feel compassion for Ms. Janowitz . . . he would not wish in a million years to . . . ever again read another volume of her memoirs.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Break in Case of Emergency reads like a novelization of a movie that hasn’t been made yet, but is that a bad thing?

Reviewed by: 

On the back cover of Ninety-Nine Stories of God, by (as her publicity packet references) “Pulitzer and National Book Award finalist” Joy Williams, author Chuck Palahniuk (who wrote Fig

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Neil Gaiman established himself long ago as sort of a literary jack of all trades.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Few books published today contain the pure enjoyment that Love Slaves of Helen Hadley Hall does. And none are better written.”

Reviewed by: 

The publicity copy for Songs of My Selfie: An Anthology of Millennial Stories explains it all:

Reviewed by: 

Lust and Wonder, Augusten Burroughs’ latest memoir (Where does he get all the life experiences to fill so very many memoirs?) begins with a bit of a ba-boom.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

There is a wonderful creaminess in the writings of Edmund White. A smoothness, an opalescence.

Reviewed by: 

“Damn good book, Dimestore.”

Reviewed by: 

There was a time, and it was not so very long ago, when because we had read the texts of modern philosophy that had suddenly appeared in print, we contemplated Buddhism while we tuned the engines o

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

A memoir is a tricky thing. An art form that is often more interested in Truth than it is in facts. A work in which reality is posted through the filter of self.

Reviewed by: 

“Elizabeth McKenzie, it would seem, has a firm grasp of the obscure. She also has a killer gift for fiction.”

The Portable Veblen is a gorgeous thing.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

As acts of kindness go, it was a pretty big one.

And one that surely must have seemed as if it could and would never be repaid.

Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

A good essay written by Christopher Hitchens will rattle your teeth.

Reviewed by: 

In “Mercury,” the first of four all-too-brief essays that together comprise the final thin volume of his writings, entitled Gratitude, Oliver Sacks writes of his patients “in their ninetie

Reviewed by: 

“a splendid novel.”

The Decision, a brief new novel by Britta Bohler, can be summed up with a simple yet elegant sentence lifted from early on in the text:

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

Had Nora Ephron’s title Crazy Salad not already been taken, it might well have been better applied to this collection of American short stories of the past century than it was to Ephron’s

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Common wisdom has it, I think, that, word for word, quip by quip, writer/producer/actress Tina Fey is our leading candidate for modern-age version of Dorothy Parker.

Reviewed by: 

“a very enjoyable addition to this year’s crop of Hollywood memoirs.”

Reviewed by: 

“the best book this year . . . when it comes to literature.”

In an author’s note to his intense and amazing new collection of short fiction, Colum McCann writes:

Reviewed by: 

Margaret Atwood has the uncanny ability to create works of literature that read like topographical maps with big red arrows that announce, “You are here.” or at least, “By the time you read this yo

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

The first three paragraphs of the author’s note of David Plante’s new memoir, Worlds Apart come as something of a warning:

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

What is the reader’s take-away from The Last Love Song, Tracy Daugherty’s new biography of greatest-living-American-author Joan Didion?

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“An excellent debut . . .”

Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Something decidedly odd is going on at Blood Moon Productions, whose Babylon Series has recently released its latest Hollywood biography: Peter O’Toole: Hellraiser, Sexual Outlaw, Irish Rebel

Editor(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“This is a thoughtful, thought-provoking little book that is well worth your attention.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“[an] entertaining, enlightening success . . ."

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

There are times in which the reader feels nonplussed.

Reviewed by: 

“The rest of us would likely do better to get our celebrity fix elsewhere.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Settling into the persona of his stand-in protagonist in the opening lines of his new novel The American People Volume 1: Search for My Heart, author Larry Kramer paints a picture:

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Black Broadway is a wonderful book. . . . lushly illustrated with oversized historic photographs . . . genius . . .”

Reviewed by: 

After finishing After Woodstock: The True Story of a Belgian Movie, an Israeli Wedding, and a Manhattan Breakdown, the beleaguered reader cannot escape the fact that he knows more about

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

“a tremendous achievement. A work of truth. . . . The Bone Bridge is a book of brutal memories. It is hard to read, but impossible not to.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“It is the writing itself that astonishes. It is elegant, poetic—even appropriately elegiac—and wry.”

Reviewed by: 

In picking up the subtitle All the Gossip Unfit to Print, the folks at Blood Moon Productions have, with their new volume Love Triangle: Ronald Reagan, Jane Wyman and Nancy Davis, 

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“In the end, Tennessee Williams: Mad Pilgrimage of the Flesh stands head and shoulders above myriad other works that purport to tell the ‘whole’ story of Tennessee Williams, his li

Reviewed by: 

“One day perhaps an American author will turn his or her attention to Prince Harry and the result should be at least 600 pages of great good fun . . .

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“As it is, Lay it on my Heart is an excellent work, and Angela Pneuman reveals herself to be among the best of her generation.”

Reviewed by: 

“The book is perhaps most compelling when the author tells of the blacklist, an American evil that she bore the full brunt of for her unwillingness to cooperate in the witch hunt. . . .

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“. . . hopefully, with the cold, dark days of winter soon upon us, Emma Straub will huddle up next to the radiator and return to the literature that is in her blood.”

Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“. . . no apologies made, no stones unturned. . . . A highly entertaining if somewhat barbed biography of the American Queen of Camelot.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Scott Eyman pulls off a nifty trick in his new biography John Wayne: The Life and Legend: He actually makes the Duke seem interesting. . . . downright fascinating.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

The Snow Queen is an oddity. In some ways a parody of a Michael Cunningham novel, in other ways, a splendid dip into a deep well of literary thought.”

Reviewed by: 

“When Kasson sticks to his premise, his book is both intriguing and powerful.

Reviewed by: 

“Indeed, Hollywood looms large in the pages of The Hiltons, as the Hilton family tended to woo and marry movie stars . . .”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“To call Bitter Eden excellent is to sell it short. This is an extraordinary book, the sort that comes along all too seldom.

Reviewed by: 

“. . . there is a bit of the mystic, of real magic to the whole of Inside a Pearl and all its component parts.

Reviewed by: 

“It is a beautiful thing to know that in spite of such horrible loss, there are those who have survived and so many others whose young lives now lay before them.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Frances and Bernard is a dour thing. It is, however, impeccably well written and well constructed within the strictures of its epistolary limitations.

Reviewed by: 

“What If the author had written an actual coherent book instead of this accumulation of scraps, bric-a-brac, and castoff bits from her 1980s New Age screeds?”

Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Doris Day Confidential is a thoughtful and thought-provoking work.”

Reviewed by: 

Seldom does a book itself match its subject matter in terms of intimidation.

Reviewed by: 

Getting through The Valley of Amazement is a bit of a trudge, honestly. Which is hard to admit, given that it is such an earnest work of fiction.

Reviewed by: 

“. . . just so wonderfully well written.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . the first novel in a very long time that this reader actually stayed up late . . . to keep reading and find out What Happens Next.”

Reviewed by: 

The title “poet of the century” may not have the same impact when applied to the 20th century that it did back in the 18th, but if there was a poet worthy of the honorific, it was W. H.

Reviewed by: 

Readers already familiar with David Plante’s elegant prose and with his previous work The Pure Lover will already know the name Nikos Stangos, Mr.

Reviewed by: 

Somehow, it does not seem quite prudent, fair, or even possible to assess Salinger, David Shields and Shane Salerno’s Double-Whopper-with-Cheese biography of J. D.

Reviewed by: 

“. . . pretty damned good . . .”

Sinemania! is a madcap of a thing—in the Schiaparelli sense of the word.

Reviewed by: 

“. . . to be lauded for his scholarship and the depth of his research. . . . both thorough and complete. His failure is in not bringing Swanson alive in these pages.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . masterful writing to be sure . . .”

Reviewed by: 

The question is not whether director Rouben Mamoulian ever received the credit due him for his myriad contributions to the original production of George Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess (or, for

Reviewed by: 

“The greatest beauty of this collection is that . . . James Purdy captivates.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . a consideration of the medium and its place in popular culture.”

Reviewed by: 

“God willing, the affectations will pass, unveiling a talent less fettered by ‘style.’”

Sometimes the words on the back cover of a book can tell us oh so much:

Reviewed by: 

“Gavin Extence has written a book that is richer, more lucid than it seems on its surface.”

Reviewed by: 

Some of the best moments in Mary Wickes: I Know I’ve Seen That Face Before come in the appendix following the text in which the author, Steve Taravella, not only lists the many roles that

Reviewed by: 

“We come away from Dreadful frankly puzzled and more than a little frazzled . . .”

It takes a hell of a lot of guts to name a book Dreadful.

Reviewed by: 

“. . . Alysia Abbott gives us the gift of her father’s story, his poetry, his passion . . .”

Reviewed by: 

Evaluating the literary merit of a new project produced by a beloved comedienne can be tricky as the skill of the author may not match the level of goodwill enjoyed by the entertainer.

Reviewed by: 

“. . . the best literary biography to see print thus far this year. Period.”

Reviewed by: 

“Readers will be moved, amused, and impressed by these stories.”

Reviewed by: 

“Shocked: My Mother, Schiaparelli, and Me is a brilliant thing, well considered, well wrought, and wonderfully well written.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . it is the language—the singing, ringing language—that makes Firefly a master work.”

When last did a novel start out with such crackling good language?

Reviewed by: 

If the old and somewhat tattered adage is true and “many a true word is spoken in jest,” then Dave Bry has a great deal to answer for, because in his Public Apology he makes a great many j

Reviewed by: 

“. . . a dude’s guide to enlightenment . . . a lanky, loose-limbed labor of love . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . difficult to sum up.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . we must beware Greeks bearing books.”

Reviewed by: 

Midway through his new memoir, Life Is a Gift, singer/painter/icon Tony Bennett presents his readers with an “old Chinese proverb:”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“There is no downside to a book like After the Fall and a rara avis it is.”

Reviewed by: 

There’s irony running riot in the pages of Diane von Furstenberg and the Tale of the Empress’s New Clothes: A Fashion Fairy Tale Memoir as written by Camilla Morton, who has already foiste

Reviewed by: 

“James Wood is that wonderful thing: the academic who still loves the topic of his study.”

Reviewed by: 

“Mariah K. Young is a new author of great promise. And Masha’allah and Other Stories is a collection worthy of broad notice.”

Reviewed by: 

“Few writers can match Ms. Kingsolver for her turns of phrase.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Friendkeeping is a Hallmark card of a book.”

Reviewed by: 

“We Are What We Pretend to Be is a worthy addition [to Vonnegut’s oeuvre].”

Reviewed by: 

“For any film student, cinema scholar, or movie fan . . . The Big Screen is not to be missed.”

Reviewed by: 

“In a voice like none other. . . . perhaps the most ingratiatingly candid of the many celebrity memoirs.”

Reviewed by: 

“There is much to admire in The Heart Broke In . . . shines like a literary oasis.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . I read it all and laughed plenty.”

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

“. . . the reader comes away with no better understanding of Mr. Douglas than from reading about the actor in a fawning celebrity magazine.”

Reviewed by: 

To start with a softball of a metaphor (apt because perhaps the high point of her career to date is the 1992 film A League of Their Own), when it comes to getting her points across in her

Reviewed by: 

“. . . 500 pages of hypnotic, pokey verbosity. . . . The writing is amazing.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . a crackling good read . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . that rarest of things: a book that moves the heart and mind equally and concurrently. . . . never been another book like it.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . a potboiler of a thing, something that would have, during the studio era, been the stuff of a B picture.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“The writing is all too coy, too precious, too studied . . . Still, there is talent here, undeniable talent . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . as sweet and soothing as a Smith Brothers cherry cough drop.”

Hello Goodbye Hello is a perfect daisy chain of acquaintances old and new.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“In terms of quality, The Empty Glass is far from empty.”

Reviewed by: 

“Mr. Badman, for all his years of research, seems to have some issues with the ‘fact from the fiction, the truth from the lies’ parts.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . a series of entertaining, even endearing characters . . . make this a worthy read.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . so very rich . . . completely sublime.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Mr. Sanders is an author born . . . what stories he will tell.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Little is conjured, nothing much is shown.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . undeniably a talented writer, Mr. Sasson’s stories differ wildly in quality from the excellent . . . to the melodramatic . . .”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“A Sense of Direction seems the product of an overly educated, overly entitled entity.”

Reviewed by: 

“The Rock Star in Seat 3A will not, in and of itself, convince the Pulitzer committee that a prize is due in 2012, but a good time will be had by all.”

Reviewed by: 

“I wonder why she tries so hard for laughs. It seems that her native cant is studded with rueful humor—if any at all—as she views the world through her Lizz-colored glasses.”

Reviewed by: 

“Overall this memoir is a hoot, a loop-de-loop tale of life among the Housewives . . .

Reviewed by: 

“. . . circus peanuts, pure and simple. . . . incredibly capable of generating a cheap buzz.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Girl Walks into a Bar is a meditation on how life is defined in the aftermath of fame.”

“‘Hey, I know you!’ said the stranger.

Reviewed by: 

evasive, cloying, and from time to time even ponderous. . . . completely oblivious memoir”

Reviewed by: 

“Conversations at the American Film Institute with the Great Moviemakers: The Next Generation from the 1950s to Hollywood Today (quite the mouthful, that) is essential reading.”

Reviewed by: 

The Book of Madness and Cures promises much but actually delivers little. . . . at least I think that’s a sex scene.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“The sad ironies are, of course, that John Kennedy Toole’s death by his own hand offered his mother the tool that she needed to wedge open the doors to the publishing industry.

Reviewed by: 

“Mark Leyner is a take-no-prisoners author, one who challenges his readers to either keep up or give up, no apologies made.

Reviewed by: 

“One day we shall have a new face on the Mount Rushmore of women’s fiction, a great stone face staring blankly out along side Susann, Collins, and the late, lamented Dominique Dunne.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“No other writer has moved me as much as Benjamin Busch has in writing about war. No other writer has created such a moment of grace . . .

Reviewed by: 

“When it comes to memoirs, things don’t get more heartfelt than this. And when it comes to storytelling, few could match the humor, passion, and humanity of these pages.

Reviewed by: 

“Would that the words, sentences, and paragraphs of Pot Farm were as resin-drenched as we are told. It would have mellowed the thing, allowed some consciousness to stream.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“In combining—as the authors admit that they do—the scholarly with the gossipy in one slim volume, the resultant work is an uncomfortable blend of loose, anecdotal history and academic text

Reviewed by: 

“The joy of Ms. Simmons’ book is in its passionate love of food, a love that transcended everything that got in its way, like a pole-vaulter leaping over the bar. . . .

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Why Are Faggots So Afraid of Faggots? is a vital book, highly readable and highly rewarding.

Reviewed by: 

“. . . we have only to ask Ms. Maas about her regrets . . . ‘Mad women. Mad men. Mad days. I had a wonderful time, too. Looking back, there isn’t a single thing I would do differently.

Reviewed by: 

“. . . the question, the one that has to do with the collected stories in questions, is: Is What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank: Stories worthy of the hoopla?

Reviewed by: 

The trick of the young adult novel is one of illusion.

Reviewed by: 

“. . . that the author takes this niche subject and makes from it a tale with universal appeal is proof that Lysley Tenorio is a major new literary talent. . . .

Reviewed by: 

“Edmund White who wrote The Beautiful Room Is Empty. Edmund White who gave us A Boy’s Own Story as well. It is as if he owes it to us to always excel.

Reviewed by: 

“. . . with More Room in a Broken Heart, we hear the ballad of Carly, sung long and sultry, in a voice as crisp as a winter’s night. . . .

Reviewed by: 

“In the Spring of 2012 a new novel from Edmund White entitled Jack Holmes and His Friend, is upcoming. The reader hopes that with this new work of fiction Mr.

Reviewed by: 

“Simon Doonan seems to be living in a world of yesterday when it comes to gay consciousness, gay accomplishments, and human (gay and non-gay) rights to the point that, when he mentions arti

Reviewed by: 

“Brian Kellow delivers. . . . the filmic rise and fall of a woman of true brilliance, huge ego, and no small amount of neuroses.”

Reviewed by: 

“In so many other places in Look, I Made a Hat, as here, Stephen Sondheim has tales to tell, names to drop and wonderful, rich, savory mincemeat to make of others, all in his own i

Reviewed by: 

“Safe to say that of all the loves of her life, men’s hats tend to rise to the top of Ms.

Reviewed by: 

“In moments like this, the reader wishes that Ms.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“John Hodgman is a juggernaut of funny!”

Reviewed by: 

“Is Everybody Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns) is a funny, thoughtful, and extremely well-crafted book.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“To read these comic poems in blank verse again is to live childhood again, when the surly, often irate insect was first discovered.

Reviewed by: 

“And perhaps this is the difference between this book and Magical Thinking. There, in the previous work, Ms. Didion wrote in a state of shock, a place of mourning and loss.

Reviewed by: 

“Surely in the past three decades we have moved beyond merely the inclusion of Speedos and horny waiters and The Pines in order for something to be considered ‘gay fiction.’ . . .

Reviewed by: 

“Would that the publisher have gone on the complete journey with Hockney and Gayford and made this the large-scale volume that it deserved to be so that the art could have been as easily ab

Reviewed by: 

“And so it goes. In the end, Shatner’s Rules, like Shatner’s ego and Shatner’s vocal patterns, are uniquely his own.

Reviewed by: 

“Those seeking a history of the music of the 1960s and those who made it, a somewhat gossipy account of what Joni Mitchell referred to as ‘the refuge of the road,’ will find much to admire

Reviewed by: 

“From page 435 onward, Spencer Tracy is an excellent biography indeed, albeit one that would have benefited greatly from losing at least a good 200 of those first 400 pages. . . .

Reviewed by: 

“We should all live such lives—dreaming and attaining, loving and lusting—and look so good when we sit down to write our memoirs. . . .

Reviewed by: 

“What we have here is a collection of vaguely amusing errata corralled together with the slightest of lassos, a book with all the organizational clarity of a stand-up act. . . .

Reviewed by: 

“Had the reader the gift of reading between the lines, he no doubt would find a great deal to love in Luck and Circumstance. . . .

Reviewed by: 

“Throughout Rin Tin Tin: The Life of the Legend Susan Orlean presents a story that is as engrossing as it is illuminating, which is, of course, her special magic.

Reviewed by: 

“ . . . [an] unflaggingly overbearing and underwritten memoir . . . At once Florence Henderson tells the reader far too much and far too little . . .”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Dear Cary is a most intriguing and well-written memoir, one in which the actress, having heard it all before, anticipates the reader’s questions and answers them before they are a

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“And while the idea of a life consisting of essays might intrigue, The Other Walk does not.”

Reviewed by: 

“But, oh, there is fun to be had in The Goddess of Vengeance. Fun aplenty. . . . No one will ever accuse Jackie Collins of writing literature. . . .

Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Christopher Hitches has the eye of a painter and the literary skill of a novelist. He infuses his essays with the same narrative thrust that can be found in the most addictive fiction.

Reviewed by: 

“That such a young author writes so well in his debut novel seems miraculous.

Reviewed by: 

“Jane Fonda: The Private Life of a Public Woman never disappoints. It enlightens, informs, intrigues, . . .

Reviewed by: 

“. . . the image that emerges of Joseph Heller and his wife are seen very much through the filter of Erica Heller’s own life experience. . . .

Reviewed by: 

“Throughout The Queer Art of Failure, Ms. Halberstam holds a mirror up to our culture, albeit one that is, from time to time, a bit fogged by the warmth of her own breath.

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Reviewed by: 

“. . . the ideas presented in this book are wild and woolly and well worth committing to the page. . . .

Reviewed by: 

“Julie Salamon evokes Wendy Wasserstein herself, filling the printed pages not only with laughter, but also the details of a stranger, sadder, darker side about which it was once said, ‘ben

Reviewed by: 

“The Family Fang is the sort of perfectly idiosyncratic thing that comes along only ever so often. . . . This book should succeed spectacularly. . . .

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“By way of recommending Yannick Murphy and The Call, I point out that it is the rare novel that is good enough to send the reader off to seek and

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Homosexuality is an issue that brings out the passion in all concerned. And yet, honest passion is what the novel is lacking.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“All [the stories in this collection] share a quality of an emotional ache. And all share a tendency toward material that is overworked, with tales told in unfortunate verb tenses . . .

Reviewed by: 

“As published, Not Afraid of Life is something like a Tasmanian Emu, a flightless bird, and not in the cute March of the Penguins sort of way, but in the way that suggests

Reviewed by: 

“Only after the batteries were exhausted, and I had called both the electric and water companies just to say hello did I get off the phone.

Reviewed by: 

“Sitting Pretty is filled with enough anecdotes to keep movie fans happy and intimate details enough for gossip fans as well.”

Reviewed by: 

“in Ms. Ciuraru’s talented hands, these assembled brief tales of authors’ lives . . . make for what can only truthfully be called ravishing reading. . . .

Reviewed by: 

“Simply put, a book that lingers, chapter after chapter, on the merits of other works, novels, shorts stories, memoirs and nonfiction, must itself be able to withstand comparisons to these

Reviewed by: 

“Such promise. Such disappointment. . . .

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“. . . a truly remarkable literary creation. . . . There’s a balance, a way of seeing and then expressing on the page, that sets Mr.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Each story contained in this collection is a beautifully faceted and highly polished gem. . . . at long last, a collection of these short works of fiction.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“He has helped us to better understand . . .

Reviewed by: 

Christopher Hitchens. The name alone is polarizing. Mentioning it causes some to spontaneously applaud, others to spontaneously combust.

Reviewed by: 

Biographer Michael Feeney Callan gives a strong indication of what we may expect from his new work, an exhaustively researched volume on the career of actor, filmmaker, and champion of independent

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

In the United Kingdom, author Will Self is well enough known to have been the punch line for a rapid-fire gag on “Absolutely Fabulous,” which is, in the realm of pop culture, high praise indeed.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

If author Lynne Tillman were writing recipes and not short fiction, she no doubt would insist that all ingredients be fresh, crisp, and organic—because her short stories are of the sort that seem v

Reviewed by: 

Tiny Terror: Why Truman Capote (Almost) Wrote Answered Prayers is a victim of what might be called “the curse of a beautiful face.” Or, more precisely, the curse of a beautiful title.

Reviewed by: 

Right up front, Jennifer Grant tells her readers that she was very resistant to the idea of writing a book about her father.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Early on in the pages of his latest novel, The Burning House, author Paul Lisicky diligently gives his readers an overview of the mechanics on which his story will spin, as he writes:

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

After passing the rigorous entrance exams and arriving at the fabled campus of the world-famous New York Academy of Reviewers, located in the heart of United Nations Plaza, excited new student revi

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

In the preface to his 2008 definitive text How Fiction Works, author and literary critic James Wood writes:

Reviewed by: 

Were I suddenly granted the power to assemble the greatest dinner party in history, Oriana Fallaci would most certainly occupy a seat at the table.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

In the uniquely unsettling, almost disorienting mimesis that shapes the towered Metropolis of Deborah Eisenberg’s short stories, the reader finds himself more than once at a disadvantage.