Graphic, Nonfiction, Comics, & Cartoons

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A good superhero needs a great storyline to make an impression on his/her readers.

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“Never saccharine, often wry, always charming, this book seduces its readers and infects them with the desire for whimsical dishes and intimate connection.”

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This is a golden age of independent comics. Artists develop singular approaches, cultivate followings online, and burst into the print scene with fully developed universes and styles.

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Passing for Human is a compelling weaving of stories about author-illustrator Liana Finck's mother, her father, herself and how each of them has difficulties figuring out themselves, figur

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This is the time of stories about refugees and immigrants in every format possible.

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This collaborative collection of comics representing a variety of voices and experiences was sparked by the concern that under President Trump abortion rights and other aspects of Obamacare would b

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This unique graphic novel deserves high praise for direction and purpose.

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At the University of Pennsylvania, where I teach memoir, I’ve started a tradition.

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Author Sybille Titeux and Dark Horse Comics have teamed up to release a timely and sweeping graphic novel called Muhammad Ali that should literally blow fans of the boxing legend’s minds.

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“Overall the book achieves its aim most efficiently and pleasurably, serving as an introduction to the academic world of Queer Theory . . .”

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The emergence of the comic book to a more mature graphic novel can easily be equated to a butterfly rising from a cocoon.

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The appeal of The Flash TV show on the CW network transcends age groups in a way that few television shows ever really do any more.

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The For Beginners series of graphic nonfiction books take on complicated subjects in an authoritative but accessible and entertaining manner.

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In author/illustrator Andy Warner’s latest graphic novel, Brief Histories of Everyday Objects, just about every major object invented on planet earth is featured in black-and-white comic s

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In the opening pages of March: Book Three, the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama has just ended its Sunday school lessons when a bomb explodes.

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“MariNaomi does not disappoint her many fans.”

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The ideas that fell out of Stan Lee’s head seem to have come to RULE THE WORLD!

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Science writer Lauren Redniss takes us on a most meditative, enchanting, and perilous journey via her prose and with her stunning artwork in Thunder & Lightning: Weather Past, Present, Futu

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Riad Sattouf, the cartoonist and social commentator, has drawn a colorful and engaging first chapter of his three-part autobiography—now in English.

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Diana Gabaldon writes in the beginning of her first graphic novel, The Exile, that her mother taught her to read by the age of three by reading her comic books.