Family Memoir

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“‘I dedicate this book to everyone who helped create its contents in any way, including the assholes.’”

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“Wilson has created a panoramic saga of cruelty, injustice, loyalty, and devotion.

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“The first thing I learned about parenting is that kids ain’t goin’ nowhere.”

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The co-authors of Vanderbilt: The Rise and Fall of an American Dynasty, journalist Anderson Cooper and novelist and historian Katherine Howe, posit that the Vanderbilt family suffered from

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The author, Krys Malcolm Belc, is a nonbinary, transmasculine parent who shares his journey from giving birth to his son, to his decision two years later to take testosterone therapy, and to becomi

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“‘Don’t you have to be born with a voice?’ it was as if my mother had cast a spell on me that I spent a lifetime trying to break.”

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“In 1883, English intellectual Francis Galton coined the term eugenics (meaning ‘wellborn’) to advocate a selective breeding program among humans.”

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From the start it is clear Floating in a Most Peculiar Way is going to be a journey of discovery like few others. Not many people can say they are from a country that no longer exists.

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“If being told you’d kill yourself was not hitting bottom, what was? That changed nothing. He had been run over by a car. That changed nothing. He had been beaten until his brain bled.

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Homeira Qaderi’s Dancing in the Mosque starts with a mother’s “Once Upon a Time” folkloric Afghan fable for her son about a magical lamp that will grant his wishes.

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Nick Flynn’s mother set fire to their house and later killed herself.

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“This book is personal, deeply and bravely thoughtful, and creatively expressed. . . . it can serve as a tool for the politically engaged.”

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“It took Europe arguably two generations to fully face up to its shameful Holocaust past.

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“. . . this book is a remarkably compassionate story of emotional family horror from which neither uncle nor niece could easily escape.”

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“She ties it tight. It takes a while to find a vein. She can’t use her arms anymore, her veins have collapsed. But at the back of the knee, she still has one that lights up for her.

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“When the earth is cracking behind your feet and it feels like the whole world is going to swallow you up, you put one foot in front of the other and you keep going.

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Gay Like Me is not just an expression of love, but it is a collection of parental advice many LGBTQ+ youth will never otherwise have.”

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Dawn Newton’s memoir starts with a cancer diagnosis. Yet Newton writes about change and loss, insecurity and self-doubt. She writes delicately about human value and how to know it.

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“Hurry Down Sunshine . . . stands the test of time. Michael Greenberg’s intense and probing mind offers a singular perspective on a universal experience.

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“Goodbye, Sweet Girl, bursting with such heartfelt, beautifully crafted scenes, is a gift for those who’ve experienced the pain of growing up and out of abusive re

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“a beautifully written, thoroughly researched tale of family, friends, and history. It is an easy read, with humor, pathos . . .”

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“The boundaries which divide Life from Death are at best shadowy and vague. Who shall say where the one ends, and where the other begins?” Edgar Allan Poe

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Katja Petrowskaja has indeed, as her publicist claims, written an “inventive and unique literary debut” as she travels to various countries in search of her family’s dramatic 20th century history.

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