Arts, Design & Photography

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Albert Watson: Creating Photographs is a soft cover book that is hardly a coffee table book.

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“By describing her own journey, Chicago offers an unglamorous view of the life of an artist who became famous as well as infamous . . .”

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If you ask the Catholic Church, they’ll tell you that Saint Veronica—the apocryphal woman who wiped Christ’s bloodied, sweat-soaked face as he made his way to his death at Calvary—is the patron sai

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This gorgeously produced book is a baby photo album with one major difference. All the Dads are gay men, married or single, who have become parents through surrogacy or by adoption.

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Call it a celebration, a fortieth anniversary gift, a visual chronicle of one of the most controversial fashion designers of the 20th and 21st centuries . . . Vivienne Westwood.

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Homer was an expressive artistic powerhouse, and the Cullercoats work proves his versatility.”

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“A nicely crafted popular history, Battle for the Big Top will appeal to anyone who has ever wondered about the men who gave us the thrill of three-ring circuses.”  

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“Isn’t the final goal of surrealism, after all, to transform the world?”
—Luis Buñuel

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Marimekko: The Art of Printmaking is a celebration for one of the most renowned and recognizable “créateurs” of the last and present centuries.

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Do Something for Nothing is no real reflection of the magnanimity of the project behind it.

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“Gross and Daley’s photographs tell a story, a deeply important story . . .”

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It was probably a very good idea not to include the words “aura reading” in the title of this book, even though that is 100 percent what it is about.

“a deep intellectual probe into the importance and significance of photography as it morphed from a secondary tool of artists into photography’s acceptance as the art itsel

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Australian journalist Chloe Angyal’s Turning Pointe delves into the many troubling issues that have been pervasive in classical ballet companies in the US.

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United Arrows serves as a chronicle, a diary of sorts, about a revolution and the trajectory of a retailer and brand that have been in business for 30 years in Tokyo.

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“In these pages, ideas and creativity still matter, making this welcome book a cause for celebration.”

“Mona Kuhn: Works will secure her prominence as an artist who has a love for life and and the ability to manifest that love through beautiful photography.

”Many will judge that, despite all the emotional chaos, William Feaver has cornered a lion, and that Lucian Freud has earned his place in the pantheon of great post-war realist painters.

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Before the reader even opens Stones of Grand Bazaar: Meváris Jewellery from Istanbul, he or she will have a definite expectation regarding the subject matter.

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Dan Jones has meticulously researched and almost surgically documented Diana’s adult life (pre, during, and post marriage to Prince Charles) by offering the reader a “menu” of what she wore, when s

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Most savvy and informed fashion readers will be ecstatic with the content of The Perfect Imperfection of Golden Goose.

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“an engrossing portrait of the artist, his art, and his incorrigible personality.”

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In the beginning, the Bible tells us, God created man in his image.

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A Light in the Dark by veteran film scholar and critic David Thompson is not so much a comprehensive history of film directors—that would take a much larger volume than this—as it is a ser

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A vast majority of devoted and knowledgeable readers or fashion followers could easily say it was the best of the times, it was the worst of times!

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