Arts, Design & Photography

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“this book is an excellent companion to a survey of photography course, or as an introduction to the evolution of modern visions in photography.”

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“Bill Cunningham was a New York institution, part of what made NYC the fashion capitol of the world.”

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Every major sport in every country has at least one iconic venue associated with it.

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This account of the rise of punk in East Germany is openly the work of a devoted fan of that scene. Tim Mohr is upfront about his emotional investment in the topic.

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Readers of the English language might take one look at words such as Cwmystradllyn, Tre’r Ceiri, Moelwynion, Gwastadnant, and Llanfairpwllgwyngyll and turn around, hands in the ai

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There really aren’t enough superlatives to describe this book; Jewelry for Gentlemen is so much more than what one should expect from a book with such a simple title.

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“Classy and scholarly, punchy and approachable, Jean Dubuffet and the City demonstrates what future research and curating could offer to the next generation of art history publicat

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“Pink is etherealized red . . . the true color of love.” —Margaret Story, 1930

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"Beard avoids the temptation to lecture on what the author imagines as the meaning of the image.

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Before even opening the book what struck this prospective reader is that barely any other designer/brand has been afforded such a comprehensive “catalog” of each and every one of their collections.

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René Lacoste created probably the most ubiquitous and enduring brand logo that comes to mind; decades before there was Ralph Lauren’s polo pony there was the Lacoste alligator.

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Gill Stark has proffered a rather fascinating read for almost any fashion reader.

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Published to coincide with the first major Berthe Morisot international exhibition in decades, if ever (this is, in fact, the first exhibition of its kind to be held in Canada), Berthe Morisot,

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Jess Berry tries to convey to the reader the links between fashion, interiors (salons/shops) and modernism: (modern artistic or literary philosophy and practice; especially: a self-conscious break

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In 1997 Eugène Delacroix (1798–1863) scholar Barthélémy Jobert published a monograph to honor the 200th birthday of this perplexing 19th century painter.

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The myths and allure of The Beat poets continues to intoxicate.

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David Lynch, Nudes by David Lynch is a lavishly produced book of contemporary photographic art.

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“an unsettling resonance that more triumphantly framed survivor stories rarely achieve.”

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These are the first words you read upon opening this book:

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By all appearances, the Bernsteins were a loving family.

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John S. Dixon seems the perfect person to write The Christian Year in Painting as an art historian, professor, and the arts correspondent for a Catholic newspaper.

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Van Gogh and the Seasons is everything one would want in a Vincent van Gogh monograph and much more.

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The recipe for the success of this monograph is equal parts Giles Deacon (brilliantly talented and visionary designer), Katie Grand (muse, editor and stylist for the biggest names in fashion) and

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From its title and front cover one might expect that what awaits will be some historical romp through fashion starting with the second half of the 20th century concluding in today’s world of fashio

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Having an almost borderline addiction to leopard print and all of its cousins this reader/reviewer was more than excited and looking forward to have this book in his hands to read and review.

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