Cookbooks

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“most importantly, Twitty reminds us that you don’t have to be Black or Jewish to love koshersoul.”

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Jane Dunn says she’s loved baking ever since she was young, watching in awe everything her grandmother did in the kitchen.

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“Whatever you cook or don’t cook, this book is a trip to the islands or islas of the world.”

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Jane Dunn says she’s loved baking ever since she was young, watching in awe everything her grandmother did in the kitchen.

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Beautiful photos, pantry item suggestions, notes on language including the authors’ decision to use Iranian versus Persian, abbreviations noting whether a dish is vegetarian, vegan, and/or gluten-f

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“Peináo means ‘I’m hungry’ in Greek,” write Helena Moursellas and Vikki Moursellas, identical twins from Adelaide, South Australia, whose culinary passion goes back to the when their godmother spen

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this book works on many levels—as an entry into different cultures and kitchens and as a way to bring those foods into our home, making them our own.”

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This is a pleasure of a cookbook full of great recipes . . .”

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more than just ingredients, it is an accumulation of knowledge, sourcing, collaboration, farms, orchards, fields, and artistry.”

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opens the door to what American cookery is—the coming together of cultures, identities, flavors, and tastes that celebrate what is probably one of the most diverse cuisine

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“Throughout these pages, I’m going to (politely) refute the claim that Southern food is all bad for you and hopefully breathe new life into some tired, worn-out notions,” writes Lauren McDuffie in

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“This book belongs on the shelf until the next library book sale.”

“if you’re already intrigued by Indonesian food traditions or looking to learn a new and unfamiliar style of cooking, The Indonesian Table is an excellent introduction.”

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“This lush book is beautiful to look at but also very easy to use.”

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Tapas—delicious tidbits served on tiny dishes that originally served as lids for glasses of wine or sherry—are meant to be just two mouthfuls and were until recently free for those ordering spirits

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For home chefs, this book can be enjoyed just for the recipes or, even for those who make reservations for dinner, as a travel guide and an entry into the food customs, in

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“Noah Galuten shares his insights into stocking a pantry, cutting vegetables (even rinsing rice) and cooking everything from simple sauces to sublime gratins with a warm an

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“the Oliviers’ recipes are easily accessible for home chefs wanting to recreate the foods South African cuisine without much fuss or difficulty . . .”

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This beautiful book of Italian Jewish family recipes invites you to indulge in the pleasure of eating healthful and tasty dishes, reflecting the flavors of Italian Jewish

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“even if we never make these dishes of ancient times, Miller’s book is a fascinating read.”

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“Maria Pasquale takes us on a leisurely tour of Rome, the markets, restaurants . . . and eateries. . . .

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“Accompanied by color photos, many of her recipes are simple to make, elegant to look at, and flavorful.”

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In this beautifully photographed book, Caroline Griffiths makes the case for eating healthfully without sacrificing flavor or taste.”

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“If you love to cook, are undaunted with unique ingredients, and want to capture the flavors of another land, accept the challenge and get cooking.”

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