Anthropology

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While it’s not likely that humans will completely stop eating animals, it’s likely and desirable that we’ll eat, exploit, and harm far fewer animals than we do now.

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“This is a long but never less than gripping book, though the rich examples are stronger than the analysis they feed.”

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“This sweeping and novel synthesis exploring the arc of the human condition— its highly diverse forms of political organizing, and the future that lays in store for us—may well prove to be

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“In her quiet, humble way, Goodall and her co-author have masterminded a full-bore assault on the cynicism, emotional exhaustion, and despair of living in a world in the throes of climate c

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“One story that is far from convincing, showing not much of story’s fabled power at all.”

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“This is a fascinating and easy to read survey history that avoids legal jargon and deftly combines history, anthropology, and legal analysis to provide an excellent introduction to why law

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“‘all human cultures share one common trait: they adapt constantly in response to all manner of variables. .  .  . and long-term success .  .  .

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“Garrett Ryan entertains as well as educates on the ancient history of the Greeks and Romans.”

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It’s nice to know where we come from. Some folks are still taking it hard that we descended from apes, but there are new discoveries all the time.

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“Run. Fight. Think.”
—Sebastian Junger

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The question of land—how we understand it, who controls it, how it’s been distributed/claimed/seized historically, and how climate change will alter it—is a crucial one.

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Instead of pursuing the Muse, we passively hear her.

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“The author knows that ‘to erase stigma, all of us—those in the medical community as well as laypeople—need to be less judgmental about mental illness in ourselves and in others and learn t

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What is the foundation of civilization? The longtime answer has been the wheel. Other scholars claim that agriculture marks the beginning of civilization, or the domestication of animals.

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“That we have new levels of symbolic saturation via social media should give us a long moment of pause as we consider the intended and unintended effects of the powerful technologies that m

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“Cities truly have occupied a unique place in human history and civilization and this timely book certainly relates how cities have become so critically important to humanity’s rise.”

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A sobering, scarifying account that leaves the reader exhausted and in awe at the author’s endurance during these ritual gatherings of the MAGA tribe.”

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“We need anthropology now more than ever. As Ruth Benedict once noted prophetically, ‘The purpose of anthropology is to make the world safe for human difference.’”

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"Beard avoids the temptation to lecture on what the author imagines as the meaning of the image.

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“Trillions of dollars move through the world’s markets illegally, and millions of people work in extra-state activities.

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"a delicious little book packed with erudition and pleasure . . ."

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“a book not only fascinating but necessary for these trying times.”

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“an important barometer of youth mental health and reminder of the insidious ways that technology can swiftly reshape society right under our noses.”

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Local history can be rich, exotic, complicated, personal, and dark but especially when an incident like the Scopes Monkey Trial serves as an “island” in regional and national social currents.

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Happy Anyway is a collection of short essays by current and past denizens of Flint, Michigan—the hometown of General Motors.

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