Literary Nonfiction

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“grab your secret decoder ring and your blaster, strap yourself in for liftoff, and enjoy. . . . The pictures in this book are reason enough to buy it.”

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If offers compelling research, information, and speculative insight. It reminds us all that we should read Kipling again.”

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“The Infernal Library is truly an imaginative way of looking at history—and it’s by far better written than the words of the leaders Kalder focuses on.”

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We know more about William Shakespeare than we know about the lives and work of most of his contemporaries; the documentary record, though sparse, is substantial.

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“[S]ome empowering concepts and more than a few compelling arguments should you decide to approach Don’t Read Poetry . . .

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“White is a refreshing read because it’s just so full of rage.

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What if we took seriously the form of thinking that we find in tragedy, and the experience of partial agency, limited autonomy, deep traumatic affect, agnostic conflict, g

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Arguably the world’s first novel, The Tale of Genji was written by a Japanese noblewoman known as Murasaki Shikibu around the year 1,000 CE.

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“Little Boy will delight you again and again. It is rich and playful poetry disguised as a novel, and it is pure Ferlinghetti.”

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There is something about the word delights that quickly brings to mind such things as sweetness, laughter, and endless flirtation. Ross Gay’s small book seems designed for the backpack.

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“Placeless People delves deeply into the philosophy of human rights but with easy prose and a structure that would give anyone pause when thinking about our times.

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“To spend hours in this writer’s company as he records the days and years is to have an instructive and unfailingly urbane companion.”

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“The fact remains that Jonathan Franzen is a hell of a writer.

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Sleep of Memory shows how literature trumps philosophy and political theory.

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“OIivares makes us laugh, cry, and empathize with immigrants grappling with conflicting identities and often unwilling hosts.

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Bloomsbury’s Object Lessons series offers small, pocket-sized books big on ideas and insights into the theoretical and cultural implications of everyday objects.

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"Alsen uses a conversational style for this concise narrative that enlightens a part of a dark and mysterious literary figure of our time."

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One of the great myths in the religion of American literature celebrates the twisted wisdom of the alcoholic writer—the brazen artist who finds narrative meaning by washing his brain with a boozy e

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The Dark Mountain Project is a worldwide collective of writers, artists, activists co-founded by Dougald Hine and Paul Kingsnorth, dedicated to creating “uncivilized” art, poetry, prose, and more.

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"a comprehensive biography befitting a giant of the literature of the United States.."

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“we readers can be thankful for these beautiful poems of pain and healing by a writer who shares his life with great care . . .”

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Books take us hostage and transport us to times and places where we ourselves can’t go, whether it’s to a remote tropical island or to the Parthenon in ancient Greece.

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Ever since it was first published in England in 1847 and in the U.S. in 1848, Jane Eyre has been a literary phenomenon, widely read, profoundly influential, and lovingly imitated.

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This is a brilliant, erudite and very readable book exposing how Jane Austen, while seemingly embroidering the small domestic canvas with which we are all familiar, was in fact deliberately using h

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Andrew Dickson is former arts editor at the Guardian, was at the 2012 Shakespeare festival at the Globe Theater in London highlighted by productions of Shakespeare from all over the world

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