Literary Nonfiction

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“To spend hours in this writer’s company as he records the days and years is to have an instructive and unfailingly urbane companion.”

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“The fact remains that Jonathan Franzen is a hell of a writer.

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Sleep of Memory shows how literature trumps philosophy and political theory.

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“OIivares makes us laugh, cry, and empathize with immigrants grappling with conflicting identities and often unwilling hosts.

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Bloomsbury’s Object Lessons series offers small, pocket-sized books big on ideas and insights into the theoretical and cultural implications of everyday objects.

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"Alsen uses a conversational style for this concise narrative that enlightens a part of a dark and mysterious literary figure of our time."

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One of the great myths in the religion of American literature celebrates the twisted wisdom of the alcoholic writer—the brazen artist who finds narrative meaning by washing his brain with a boozy e

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The Dark Mountain Project is a worldwide collective of writers, artists, activists co-founded by Dougald Hine and Paul Kingsnorth, dedicated to creating “uncivilized” art, poetry, prose, and more.

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"a comprehensive biography befitting a giant of the literature of the United States.."

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“we readers can be thankful for these beautiful poems of pain and healing by a writer who shares his life with great care . . .”

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Books take us hostage and transport us to times and places where we ourselves can’t go, whether it’s to a remote tropical island or to the Parthenon in ancient Greece.

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Ever since it was first published in England in 1847 and in the U.S. in 1848, Jane Eyre has been a literary phenomenon, widely read, profoundly influential, and lovingly imitated.

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This is a brilliant, erudite and very readable book exposing how Jane Austen, while seemingly embroidering the small domestic canvas with which we are all familiar, was in fact deliberately using h

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Andrew Dickson is former arts editor at the Guardian, was at the 2012 Shakespeare festival at the Globe Theater in London highlighted by productions of Shakespeare from all over the world

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Seiji Ozawa was a gifted piano student studying at Toho Gakuen School of Music in Japan, but after he hurt his hand playing rugby, he switched to conducting and received a scholarship to study unde

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As someone who teaches humanities courses at the university level, I am often in despair at the superficiality of understanding my students have regarding Shakespeare. 

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In May 1944, at the age of 77, Laura Ingalls Wilder received a letter from a schoolteacher in Cleveland, Ohio.

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She can write like no one else.”

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his writing can be luxuriated in.

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“It helps for readers to have a taste for the quirky, the offbeat, and the unusual.”

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The oevre of Charles Bukowski, American cult poet of the latter half of the 20th century, is something akin to an Antarctic ice sheet that mysteriously keeps growing while you would expect it to me

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has all of the makings and quality to become a collector’s item . . .”

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Mesmerizing and at times mesmerizingly confusing, Harold Bloom’s new opus, The Daemon Knows: Literary Greatness and the American Sublime, is (but only fractionally) this: A mix of the tend

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Jacob Dinezon (1856–1919) was a Yiddish novelist and short story writer, as famous during his lifetime as were his contemporaries, the three pillars of late 19th and early 20th century Yiddish lite

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“Bravo! May there be more of this kind of book!”

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