Literary Nonfiction

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“Demons haunted Germany after World War II, and Germans turned to ancient rites and rituals to seek redress and recovery. Professor Black tells that story well.”

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What Were We Thinking will give you a fascinating overview and analysis of the books that explain where we are now, how we got here, and where we might be headed.”

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“Eric Weiner’s The Socrates Express presents universal concepts in an immediately accessible way, reminding us that, in an increasingly frenetic world, there is no more important l

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“Selling the Farm by Debra Di Blasi is a creative work for those who enjoy poetic prose in a familial memoir.”

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“This is a very good read, especially at introducing writers at all levels to authors they may want to know more about.”

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The inspiration for Marjorie Garber’s interesting but ultimately frustrating book seems to be the political ascendancy of Donald Trump.

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“the term ‘hard-boiled’ came to mean a type of character that readers can, on the one hand idealize, while on the other hand, they can rely on for certainty in an uncertain world.

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“intriguing, certain to be debated for some time, and likely to bring pleasure to young scholars who encounter See’s playful prose in the midst of their studies.”

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“a superb chronicle of marginalization, a collage depicting a continent-sized country still finding its way nearly 200 years after independence.”

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Coventry marks a return to a more conventional style of writing, yet retains that same sense of an alert, engaged intelligence, negotiating the complexities of women’s lives and i

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“A professor of English at Rutgers with a specialty in the history of the book, Leah Price has encyclopedic knowledge.

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“readers will appreciate the elegance of both writers here, and will, moreover, relish the couple’s unending devotion to each other.”

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“grab your secret decoder ring and your blaster, strap yourself in for liftoff, and enjoy. . . . The pictures in this book are reason enough to buy it.”

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If offers compelling research, information, and speculative insight. It reminds us all that we should read Kipling again.”

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“The Infernal Library is truly an imaginative way of looking at history—and it’s by far better written than the words of the leaders Kalder focuses on.”

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We know more about William Shakespeare than we know about the lives and work of most of his contemporaries; the documentary record, though sparse, is substantial.

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“[S]ome empowering concepts and more than a few compelling arguments should you decide to approach Don’t Read Poetry . . .

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“White is a refreshing read because it’s just so full of rage.

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What if we took seriously the form of thinking that we find in tragedy, and the experience of partial agency, limited autonomy, deep traumatic affect, agnostic conflict, g

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Arguably the world’s first novel, The Tale of Genji was written by a Japanese noblewoman known as Murasaki Shikibu around the year 1,000 CE.

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“Little Boy will delight you again and again. It is rich and playful poetry disguised as a novel, and it is pure Ferlinghetti.”

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There is something about the word delights that quickly brings to mind such things as sweetness, laughter, and endless flirtation. Ross Gay’s small book seems designed for the backpack.

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“Placeless People delves deeply into the philosophy of human rights but with easy prose and a structure that would give anyone pause when thinking about our times.

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“To spend hours in this writer’s company as he records the days and years is to have an instructive and unfailingly urbane companion.”

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“The fact remains that Jonathan Franzen is a hell of a writer.

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