Medical

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The first thing to say about Elizabeth Blackwell and her younger sister Emily is that they were formidable women.

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“[I]n a world beset by scientific illiteracy and misinformation, Isaacson is the gene whisperer we so desperately need.”

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Katherine Standefer’s memoir about the medical device that saved her life and her quest to discover what it cost in terms of the environment and human lives starts with a jolt and keeps up the pace

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“Illness is nothing if not a narrative: the present isn’t what the past was supposed to lead up to, and the future holds God only knows what.

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Healing Politics is a book for today, a roadmap for moving the United States out of its male, white-privileged status to one where there is, in fact and not just theory, equal opp

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Dawn Newton’s memoir starts with a cancer diagnosis. Yet Newton writes about change and loss, insecurity and self-doubt. She writes delicately about human value and how to know it.

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Sunil Dutta takes you on a journey from northern India, grossly partitioned after the independence from the United Kingdom, into Pakistan (primarily Muslim) and India (primarily Hindu), which is an

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Oliver Sacks was a “deeply eccentric” neurologist doing a “different sort of medicine on behalf of chronic often warehoused and largely abandoned patients.” Medical colleagues mostly ignored him.

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“In Bent But Not Broken, Cummings has invited readers into his life, and the result for many will be a feeling of knowing this man well. Very well.