Children

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The Art Book for Children is a simple, effective and colorful presentation of all the potential that art can be.”

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The Queens’ English is a massive dictionary for children, ages 10 and up. It’s not about a monarch across the ocean.

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Starflower is a true labor of love celebrating resilience, girlhood, and the profoundly transformative power of art.”

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There are many children’s biographies about Marie Curie, so this one called Determined Dreamer: The Story of Marie Curie, had to bring something new to the table in order to get published.

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Annie Londonderry had never ridden a bike. She was a mother of three and a hard-working salesperson for newspaper ads.

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“It was a magical place. Building such a grand train station without computer-aided design plans . . . or modern equipment, was difficult.”

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A Kid’s Guide to the Chinese Zodiac is a must-have for anyone wanting to understand the Chinese culture . . .”

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“With a quick moving, practical and straightforward writing style, Grandin helps middle-grade readers stand to gain some valuable insights . . .”

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Dan Gutman has written another title for his Wait! What? series, called The Beatles Couldn’t Read Music. A brother and sister, Turner and Paige, are the comic strip narrators.

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“a man who shared his creativity with the world and modeled how to live an authentic life in full view, placing importance on nurturing curiosity, and forever focusing on seeing the beauty

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Genius Noses is a winner for older kids. Five stars out of five.”

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“delivers an exciting biography of triumph in spite of the odds and will be an uplifting and inspiring message for a young mind looking for encouragement to follow their dreams and see what

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!00 Immigrants Who Shaped American History is a fascinating book of people, famous and those not as apt to be a household name.

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Invisible Things is not your average picture book. Instead of 32 pages, there are 52. Instead of one main character, there are several, and not who you might think.

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“integrates frontier history, solid writing, and brilliant illustrations and mixes that together with imaginative fun, quirky problem-solving resourcefulness, big picture ambition and human

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Before Colors is a wide ranging, effectively organized look into the origins of colors offering a satisfying dive into answering some of those nagging (or better said, wonderful)

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"Budding astronomers will savor each page and read this book over and over again."

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“Even with its problems, the book is colorful, handy, and good for any budding gardener, scientist, botanist, or biologist.”

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"Picture book magic at its best . . ."

 

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No World Too Big is a colorful compendium of compelling stories about 24 brave young people who have each done something extraordinary to raise awareness of climate change

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The Library of Congress was started when Thomas Jefferson sold his entire library to the U.S. Government. He was a lifelong reader.

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“beautiful . . . contrasting images of stars and outer space.”

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“The general message in LGBTQ+ Families is that all types of families exist, and they are formed in many different ways.”

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