Children

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“With A Life of Service: The Story of Senator Tammy Duckworth, Soontornvat and Phumiruk have inspired young readers to ‘break barriers and defy expectations,’ to soar, to not waste

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The Secret Life of Butterflies is a gorgeous book with a blue cover loaded with Monarch butterflies.

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“Every science classroom would benefit from having a copy of Up Your Nose.

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Animal BFFs is a treasure trove of information about animal pairings that a reader can enjoy in one sitting. A whole science curriculum could be developed around this book . .

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“Far from a stuffy, dusty story, Turner gives us an exciting scientific thriller . . .”

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“cursory and sloppy . . . ill-conceived”

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This book introduces a young child (ages 4–7) to Charles Dickens. It starts with his birth and childhood.

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As much a panda story as a panda program story, Bei Bei Goes Home tugs at the heart strings while informing the intellect.”

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Black Artists Shaping the World explains why this global synergy matters and celebrates Black art as a breakthrough from old paradigms.”

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“Together the author and illustrator have woven a powerful message, truly an anthem that children—and their parents—will want to sing loudly.”

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The tall and thin book, Nano: The Spectacular Science of the Very (Very) Small, draws us in with its warm cover of yellow, red, and teal.

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“Instead of focusing on the discrimination Beatrice faced, both words and pictures show the difficulties without focusing on them.

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The big colorful book of A History of Music for Children grabs your attention with its orange, oversized cover.

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“Interaction is the key to learning and The Book of Amazing Trees packs in so many opportunities, section after section, to spark curiosity and inspiration. . . .

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The shiny cover of Psychology for Kids invites us in with greens, bright yellows, and purple. We open the book and see colorful gears on the white background end papers.

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Brayden Speaks Up: How One Boy Inspired the Nation by Brayden Harrington is a story of perseverance, hope and triumph—a firsthand account told in third person—through the voice of a boy wh

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The graphic novel, Before They Were Artists: Famous Illustrators as Kids, covers the careers of six illustrators, three men and three women, of varying levels of fame, three deceased and t

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“This book will certainly inspire many new questions.”

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“This is a picture book meant for adults . . .”

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The Secret Life of Whales is a huge blue book with a shimmery cover. It starts off by explaining that whales belong to the Cetacean family and are either Baleen whales or toothed whales.

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“The international flavor of this book actually makes the world feel like a wonderful place to be. These are real people, and they are shown here as happy to be alive.”

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Lobe Your Brain is a colorful book about how your brain works. Although it is laid out like a 32-page picture book, it’s really for older kids, ages five and up.

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Pop-Up Moon is gorgeously illustrated by Annabelle Buxton with stunning paper-engineering by Olivier Charbonnel.

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1001 Bees is described by the publisher as a fun, fact-filled, oversized book about creatures and the world they inhabit.

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