Women’s Studies

Reviewed by: 

Cate Doty’s memoir Mergers and Acquisitions, Or, Everything I Know About Love I Learned on the Wedding Pages is a book written to appeal to those who love wedding culture, not to convert d

Reviewed by: 

The author, Krys Malcolm Belc, is a nonbinary, transmasculine parent who shares his journey from giving birth to his son, to his decision two years later to take testosterone therapy, and to becomi

Reviewed by: 

In her enthralling book Emily Midorikawa tells the stories of women, many from modest backgrounds in the US and the UK, who parlayed their alleged communications with the spirit world into social,

Reviewed by: 

The clichéd assessment “compulsively readable” seems the most appropriate response to Andrew Morton’s 385-page book on the Windsor sisters, Elizabeth and Margaret.

Reviewed by: 

Illuminating and uplifting, I Am a Girl from Africa is a must-read.

Reviewed by: 

“‘Don’t you have to be born with a voice?’ it was as if my mother had cast a spell on me that I spent a lifetime trying to break.”

Reviewed by: 

“In 1883, English intellectual Francis Galton coined the term eugenics (meaning ‘wellborn’) to advocate a selective breeding program among humans.”

Reviewed by: 

The Empathy Diaries should be required reading for men who care about the emotional landscape of women and the health of their own feminine side.”

Reviewed by: 

In just 170 pages Isabel Allende manages to write a humorous memoir, an homage to her family, all of whom seem to have walked off the pages of her delicious novels, and a feminist plea for women’s

Reviewed by: 

In 2017, at 28 years of age Gabrielle Korn was the youngest Editor-in-Chief of an independent international digital publication called Nylon; she knew herself to be “younger and gayer than

Reviewed by: 

Koa Beck’s book, White Feminism: From Suffragettes to Influencers and Who They Leave Behind, comes with a rather double- or even triple-edged endorsement from Gloria Steinem; “Don’t judge

Reviewed by: 

“The Women’s History of the Modern World revolves around certain women heroes, ‘every one in search of an identity, a new life, and a means to throw off the chains

Reviewed by: 

Homeira Qaderi’s Dancing in the Mosque starts with a mother’s “Once Upon a Time” folkloric Afghan fable for her son about a magical lamp that will grant his wishes.

Reviewed by: 

Sylvia Plath wrote some of the best poetry of the 20th century, but her work gets less attention than the way she died. So argues Heather Clark.

Reviewed by: 

Debora L. Spar’s new book, Work Mate Marry Love, appears urgent and timely.

Reviewed by: 

Vanguard serves both as a tocsin and an inspiring map forward if we are to protect voting rights for all.”

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

Carol Hay notes in her preface the current buzz of conversation around feminism, crediting the #MeToo movement with “laying bare the elephant in the room, skeletons burst from closets, dirty laundr

Reviewed by: 

“Lenz deftly skewers all of the stereotypes around pregnancy and motherhood in her wonderful, must-read Belabored: A Vindication of the Rights of Pregnant Women.

Reviewed by: 

They Didn’t See Us Coming is a working guide on how to create social change.”

Reviewed by: 

“Greed and avarice aside, this is certainly a cautionary tale, reminding us all that one must still do one's due diligence and not necessarily depend on someone’s word and ostensible good w

Reviewed by: 

People never disappoint, at least in terms of how complicated their lives are and what they might reveal if we listen closely enough.

Reviewed by: 

On June 1, 1943, Germans “pacified” the Polish village of Sochy. Anna Janko’s mother was orphaned. Sochy had “eighty-eight houses, most with thatched roofs. Two or three made of stone.

Reviewed by: 

In her Introduction Helen Lewis defines what “difficult” means when applied to the feminist pioneers whose struggles she reviews and admires.

Reviewed by: 

Katie Roiphe is noted for her trenchant and often controversial views on all things feminist.

Pages