Women’s Studies

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Sylvia Plath wrote some of the best poetry of the 20th century, but her work gets less attention than the way she died. So argues Heather Clark.

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Debora L. Spar’s new book, Work Mate Marry Love, appears urgent and timely.

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Vanguard serves both as a tocsin and an inspiring map forward if we are to protect voting rights for all.”

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Carol Hay notes in her preface the current buzz of conversation around feminism, crediting the #MeToo movement with “laying bare the elephant in the room, skeletons burst from closets, dirty laundr

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“Lenz deftly skewers all of the stereotypes around pregnancy and motherhood in her wonderful, must-read Belabored: A Vindication of the Rights of Pregnant Women.

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They Didn’t See Us Coming is a working guide on how to create social change.”

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“Greed and avarice aside, this is certainly a cautionary tale, reminding us all that one must still do one's due diligence and not necessarily depend on someone’s word and ostensible good w

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People never disappoint, at least in terms of how complicated their lives are and what they might reveal if we listen closely enough.

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On June 1, 1943, Germans “pacified” the Polish village of Sochy. Anna Janko’s mother was orphaned. Sochy had “eighty-eight houses, most with thatched roofs. Two or three made of stone.

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In her Introduction Helen Lewis defines what “difficult” means when applied to the feminist pioneers whose struggles she reviews and admires.

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Katie Roiphe is noted for her trenchant and often controversial views on all things feminist.

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Wendy Moore’s skill as a writer delivers the story of these women and the history of the war with exceptional power, laying out a compelling combination of casual

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“These women were heroes in every sense of the word and for more reasons than one.”

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“a well-researched, interesting and enjoyable biography of someone who really should be in the pantheon of feminist heroes . . .”

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Pretty Bitches is an often-hilarious collection of essays by brilliant authors that blow asunder the real meaning of pet names and labels often given to vagina owners.

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As humbling as it is to write about Eleanor Roosevelt, her own words best represent her to the world.

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Gone at Midnight is the type of true crime book that you stay up all night reading.”

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Renaissance thinking was not just about making men smarter, more intellectual, and open minded (although who would complain about that happening!).

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“An estimated 30 million people died under Stalin’s regime of terror. These nine women show us how they avoided being among them. Their voices inspire us all . . .”

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“brilliant . . . an important addition with its focus on the lives of women and its unbearably vivid details.”

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Broadside: A Feminist Review was a “groundbreaking” Canadian feminist newspaper published between 1979 and 1989.

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“The reader should be prepared for an extraordinary though long and very uneven ride.”

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“Des Jardins’ writing inspires all of us in the way Missy clearly inspired others. It’s an incredible feat for a biography to serve its subject so well.”

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