Women’s Studies

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Imagine that you begin your dream doctoral program and immediately find a professor generous with his mentoring time.

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“Lebanese-British journalist Zahra Hankir has gifted us with these women’s experiences and their voices.”

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“To Boomers, the Gabor sisters were a TV staple. . . . For decades they were Hollywood blondes and Broadway glamour gals. And then they were no more.”

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Many young teens turn rebellious as they grow up. They're trying to gain their own individuality to become independent, and many times they do this by bucking the system.

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The communes of the ’70s were “weird, wacky and mostly dysfunctional.” So said the Guardian Weekly about Christiania, a Copenhagen military barracks claimed by “seekers of peace” in 1971.

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“Each of the lives portrayed here exemplify the importance of perseverance and a refusal to be constrained by social boundaries.”

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Lean Out: The Truth About Women, Power and the Workplace though  purporting initially not to be about Sheryl Sandberg and her well-known treatise Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to

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“‘Armed with cool, nerdy facts’ the reader will be able to discuss language as an entry point into larger ideas of gender equality.”

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“through the lens of the women they depicted in their work, women as warriors, as workers, as prostitutes, as mothers, as lovers, ever present even in absence, every work shining a light on

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The Secret Lives of Glaciers melts a reader’s interest faster than climate change is melting Iceland’s glaciers. Author and geographer M.

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“if you really want to be creeped out and want a sleepless night, enter the unsavory and often seedy world of ‘Javanka’ where ruthlessness, egotism, and pure ignorance run rampant.” 

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In a rather lengthy introduction Orgad justifies her choosing as her study population privileged, educated, heterosexual, mostly middle class, mostly white, full-time stay-at-home mothers in single

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The author begins this book “hip-deep in the chaos that is modern American motherhood” but hastily clarifies that, while her own experience provided the impetus to write the book, it is not autobio

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Forgotten Women: The Artists is part of a “brand new series, which will uncover the lost histories of the women who, over thousands of years have refused to accept the hand they were dealt

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Read this book and you will be more thankful and even proud to be part of the human race from which this woman (and her husband) emerged.

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"When Women Ruled the World (or at least the Egyptian part of it) draws the reader into many less known aspects of ancient history with an informa

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Women have always struggled to obtain their due in and from this country, from the Revolution right through to today.

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“Female rage is the essential fuel of #metoo.”
—Caitlin Flanagan

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Somewhere in the middle of this revelatory and emotionally powerful memoir by Sally Field, she unpacks a story that is a case study in what Hollywood’s casting couch was like, even for an actress w

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Was it only seven years ago when self-referenced “veteran entertainment reporter” Sam Kashner teamed with biographer Nancy Schoenberger to produce that rock-’em, sock-’em tome Furious Love: Eli

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“Even within its self-imposed limitations this book could have done much more justice to its allegedly dangerous subject matter.”

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Beyond the obvious reversal of a typical coming-of-age story found in the popular young adult (YA) genre, Madeleine May Kunin’s Coming of Age: My Journey to the Eighties is a memoir full o

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“There will be people who reject Chemaly’s book as being the rantings of another angry woman. By doing so, they will prove her point.”

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In Fifty Million Rising: The New Generation of Working Women Transforming the Muslim World Saadia Zahidi provides a welcome corrective to the dominant mage of “the tired story of the downt

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