Women’s Studies

Reviewed by: 

The Secret Lives of Glaciers melts a reader’s interest faster than climate change is melting Iceland’s glaciers. Author and geographer M.

Reviewed by: 

“if you really want to be creeped out and want a sleepless night, enter the unsavory and often seedy world of ‘Javanka’ where ruthlessness, egotism, and pure ignorance run rampant.” 

Reviewed by: 

In a rather lengthy introduction Orgad justifies her choosing as her study population privileged, educated, heterosexual, mostly middle class, mostly white, full-time stay-at-home mothers in single

Reviewed by: 

The author begins this book “hip-deep in the chaos that is modern American motherhood” but hastily clarifies that, while her own experience provided the impetus to write the book, it is not autobio

Reviewed by: 

Forgotten Women: The Artists is part of a “brand new series, which will uncover the lost histories of the women who, over thousands of years have refused to accept the hand they were dealt

Reviewed by: 

Read this book and you will be more thankful and even proud to be part of the human race from which this woman (and her husband) emerged.

Reviewed by: 

"When Women Ruled the World (or at least the Egyptian part of it) draws the reader into many less known aspects of ancient history with an informa

Reviewed by: 

Women have always struggled to obtain their due in and from this country, from the Revolution right through to today.

Reviewed by: 

“Female rage is the essential fuel of #metoo.”
—Caitlin Flanagan

Reviewed by: 

Somewhere in the middle of this revelatory and emotionally powerful memoir by Sally Field, she unpacks a story that is a case study in what Hollywood’s casting couch was like, even for an actress w

Reviewed by: 

Was it only seven years ago when self-referenced “veteran entertainment reporter” Sam Kashner teamed with biographer Nancy Schoenberger to produce that rock-’em, sock-’em tome Furious Love: Eli

Reviewed by: 

“Even within its self-imposed limitations this book could have done much more justice to its allegedly dangerous subject matter.”

Reviewed by: 

Beyond the obvious reversal of a typical coming-of-age story found in the popular young adult (YA) genre, Madeleine May Kunin’s Coming of Age: My Journey to the Eighties is a memoir full o

Reviewed by: 

“There will be people who reject Chemaly’s book as being the rantings of another angry woman. By doing so, they will prove her point.”

Reviewed by: 

In Fifty Million Rising: The New Generation of Working Women Transforming the Muslim World Saadia Zahidi provides a welcome corrective to the dominant mage of “the tired story of the downt

Reviewed by: 

“Goodbye, Sweet Girl, bursting with such heartfelt, beautifully crafted scenes, is a gift for those who’ve experienced the pain of growing up and out of abusive re

Reviewed by: 

“a beautifully written, thoroughly researched tale of family, friends, and history. It is an easy read, with humor, pathos . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“This book is a catalyst for a thoughtful discussion of . . . complicated and challenging issues.”

Reviewed by: 

When recruits enter the Marine Corps many of them have an idealistic view of what constitutes an effective Marine, and they embrace the adventure that awaits them.

Reviewed by: 

An online dictionary says that a poem is a piece of writing that partakes of the nature of both speech and song that is nearly always rhythmical, usually metaphorical, and often exhibits such Susan

Reviewed by: 

Some of the history of the United States is known to many, yet the story behind the events and circumstances that make up that history not always necessarily so much.

Reviewed by: 

In Algorithms of Oppression, Safiya Umoja Noble clearly explains how search engines, used by billions daily, are not an innocent, neutral vehicle by which to search for information.

Reviewed by: 

Magdalena Yesil’s Power Up is the newest book in the tradition of Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In, in which powerful women who have spent decades downplaying their gender in order to re

Reviewed by: 

“We’ve been given an incredible gift as sentient beings: by changing the inner attitudes of our minds, we have the power to change the outer aspects of our lives.

Pages