Essays

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“Sidecountry is a treat and an education about multiple aspects and the fundamental allure of sport and the amazing story of the human struggle.”

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“Jenny Diski is an absorbing, savagely witty, insatiably curious, and gifted writer. She is direct, unafraid, and full of surprises.”

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“In this short, stunning work, with his inimitable use of language, Baldwin distills the essence of his pain and wisdom and points a way for our own time.”

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The history of Russia in the 21st century has been almost as tumultuous as its 20th century history.

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As with her four brilliant novels, Rachel Kushner’s The Hard Crowd, 19 essays from the last two decades, takes the reader on a wild ride.

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“For its penetrating thought, its joyful language, and its eclectic wanderings among the peaks and valleys of high and low culture, this book is an act of sublime generosity from a brillian

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This book might have been subtitled An Anthology of Black Lesbian Writing.

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“a marvelous volume that introduces the reader to the wide variety of American writing and literary thought of the last two centuries of our nation’s history.”

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Nearly two dozen outstanding articles on climate change, just in time for the U.S. return to the Paris accords. Now, what?

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“A challenging read that illuminates harsh truths of our time.”

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Though Tom Zoellner’s The National Road: Dispatches from a Changing America came out at the end of this unprecedented year, it is unlikely that even the author could have imagined the “cha

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Foreshadow: Stories to Celebrate the Magic of Reading and Writing YA is a fantastic book. Full stop.

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“Mishra’s astute and engaging book should . . . be seen as a warning.”

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“Engaging and provocative, Diamond’s encyclopedic meditation will certainly help readers—no matter where they live—think about what lies ahead for the outlying areas of our cities.”

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“This is a very good read, especially at introducing writers at all levels to authors they may want to know more about.”

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The best part of Essays One are the many poets and authors Davis considers influences, these will be useful for Davis’ admirers

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Places I’ve Taken My Body is an unblinking personal journey that takes us to places we all need to know and understand better.”

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Alysia Li Ying Sawchyn taught students about “ethnicity, gender, sexuality, ability, class, age” but not mental illness. She is a person of color and a woman. This the students can see.

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I Don’t Want to Die Poor is an excellent critique of the way that our society encourages people to try for more, and then punishes them for doing so.”

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“Read slowly to keep from flailing. Ortberg’s writing will wait for you to catch up.”

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“If Battle Dress is any indication of what’s to come next from Skolfield, readers should expect yet another masterfully rhythmic, morally gut-punching, timeless book of poetry.”

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“Although there are times when Chong gets a bit wordy and perhaps repetitive, her overall take on book reviewers and their work is well organized and informative.

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“a superb chronicle of marginalization, a collage depicting a continent-sized country still finding its way nearly 200 years after independence.”

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How well does Paul Krassner’s brand of humor hold up? Is there still bite in his barbs, and do his words still generate laughter?

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Mr. Know-It-All is an argument for deviance, performance, and shock.”

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