Essays

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The trope of the murdered “dead girl” serves as a catalyst for many popular crime narratives, from bestselling thrillers to limited TV series to true crime podcasts.

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Bloomsbury’s Object Lessons series offers small, pocket-sized books big on ideas and insights into the theoretical and cultural implications of everyday objects.

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For almost 40 years, feminist, environmentalist, and human rights advocate Rebecca Solnit has shepherded activists and animated a spirit of community.

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For decades, the residents of the southern Appalachian Mountain region (roughly consisting of parts of Georgia, North and South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and Kentucky) lived their lives untouc

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Every so often in this unusual and uneven book, a phrase or a scene makes a sudden unexpected connection between past and present, like the spark when an electric current flashes across a gap betwe

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Michelle Tea’s publisher, the Feminist Press, calls her a “queer countercultural icon.” She is that, indeed, and has been an icon in the queer world for decades.

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From start to finish, readers will experience Philip Roth’s love of language, sharpness of insight, playfulness, and power of imagination.

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When Julia Child and James Beard first ate at the acclaimed Manhattan restaurant, Felidia, eight months after its opening in 1981, a star-struck Chef Lidia Bastianich came to their table to introdu

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This collection of short pieces by the British writer Martin Amis takes you into a wide range of his nonfiction work.

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"The big surprise about David Sedaris’s new book, Theft by Finding: Diaries (1977–2002), is how very good it is."

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“Horror fiction is alive and well, and Paperbacks from Hell is a grand, affectionate, and informative celebration of the genre.”

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“Horse enthusiasts regularly experience the ways in which horses uplift and save us, giving meaning and peace . . .”

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As the old saying goes, “Close, but no cigar.” When You Find Out the World Is Against You and Other Funny Memories About Awful Moments by Kelly Oxford is a book that tries to put a humorou

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Baseball has served a distinctive slice of the American social experience for over 170 years. It has been the subject of countless fiction and nonfiction books, movies, plays, and music.

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". . . a gut-souring, hilarious, meticulously researched medical wonder. . ."

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“an author who has carved out her own territory and made the personal essay into a thing of beauty.”

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“a marvelous companion to this series, with wonderful illustrations and an engaging backstory . . .”

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“Hermann, your mommy was arrested on September 25, 1944. Leni and I knew why, it was terrible. Your mother in the Gestapo hell. It was our wish to have you.

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“I’d intended to provoke; what I got instead was sixty reviews in a vacuum.” Jonathan Franzen said this after penning a little-known manifesto, before he published The Corrections, spurned

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If you have an interest in writing and haven’t gone the route of a Master of Fine Arts, read this book.

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Happy Anyway is a collection of short essays by current and past denizens of Flint, Michigan—the hometown of General Motors.

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Neil Gaiman established himself long ago as sort of a literary jack of all trades.

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Why does Star Wars speak to billions? Studio heads hated it. The actors thought it ridiculous. George Lucas feared catastrophe.

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There was a time, and it was not so very long ago, when because we had read the texts of modern philosophy that had suddenly appeared in print, we contemplated Buddhism while we tuned the engines o

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In May 1944, at the age of 77, Laura Ingalls Wilder received a letter from a schoolteacher in Cleveland, Ohio.

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